Main definitions of fuller in English

: fuller1fuller2

fuller1

noun

  • A person who fulls cloth.

    • ‘The charter created the town's first link with the textile industry as it allowed fullers - who cleansed and thickened cloth by washing and beating it - to ply their trade in Bolton.’
    • ‘This had been demonstrated before in the Marian persecution in the 1550s where many of the martyrs had occupations such as labourers, weavers, carpenters and fullers.’
    • ‘Stale urine contains ammonia; in ancient Rome fullers used it in the cleaning and dyeing of clothes; in Britain it was known as lye and was the choice of poor housewives well into the nineteenth century.’
    • ‘Le Balle was also one of the places where fullers set up tenters used to stretch out cloth to dry.’

Origin

Old English fullere, from Latin fullo, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

fuller

/ˈfo͝olər/

Main definitions of fuller in English

: fuller1fuller2

fuller2

noun

  • 1A grooved or rounded tool on which iron is shaped.

    • ‘Once the billet was finished I forged a bar out of the billet, forged the shoulder, then the tip and edges, next the fuller was forged in with a fullering tool I built for this sword, lastly the tang was hammered in.’
    1. 1.1 A groove made by this, especially in a horseshoe.
      • ‘The object of the present invention is to provide an improved method of manufacturing a horseshoe with fullering using traditional smithing techniques whilst avoiding undesirable deformation.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Stamp (iron) with a fuller.

    • ‘Heavy forged gate, with 20 mm square verticals, fullered spiked tops and circles captured by collars.’
    • ‘‘The course covered forge welding, annealing, drawing out, fullering, upsetting, and most aspects of traditional blacksmithing.’’
    • ‘It should be noted the 1878 is fullered one one side only.’
    • ‘By the time he had show us drawing down, controlled bending, fullering, flatting in mild steel, I was the proud owner of a fire rake.’
    • ‘While the blade is substantial, it is fullered to provide balance and good handling characteristics.’
    • ‘Using drawing, splitting, fullering, riveting and sinking techniques, we will produce ladles, forks, spoons and spatulas using iron, copper and brass.’
    • ‘The broad, fullered blade with a clipped-back point seen on the sword shown on the salt is quite impractical for hunting.’
    • ‘The body is stiff and flexible due to the tapering and fullering as well as the spring tempered martensitic body.’
    • ‘The idea of fullering is to lighten and strengthen the blade at the same time.’
    • ‘The following miscellaneous forging operations are briefly presented: coining, heading, piercing, hubbing, cogging, fullering and edging, roll forging, and skew rolling.’
    • ‘These stations have names such as fullering, blocking, edging, bending and cut off.’

Origin

Early 19th century (as a verb): of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

fuller

/ˈfo͝olər/