Definition of front and center in US English:

front and center

adverb

  • Prominently; at the forefront.

    ‘standing front and center here today are our bravest heroes’
    • ‘James's figure disappeared into the crowd of pirates as he nimbly pushed his way towards his father, Captain Ripper - standing front and center above his men.’
    • ‘The bad news was that, for all his efforts to bury the Pinochet controversy - efforts in which Lav'n had readily colluded - it was erupting front and center.’
    • ‘This is a man who is NOT standing up front and center for drug testing with the potential Olympic athletes he represents.’
    • ‘Today, the last stereotype is standing front and center.’
    • ‘Boher looked down to the stage, finding three men, two of them giants, standing front and center.’

adjective

  • Prominent; of the greatest importance.

    ‘why is this matter suddenly front and center?’
    ‘my front-and-center concerns’
    • ‘And Carmichael was also front and center at the further manipulation of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party by the Democratic Party.’
    • ‘Now he's front and center - amid attorneys, investigators and cheerleaders - in a battle with the Pasco County School Board.’
    • ‘‘Right now, Baghdad and Iraq are front and center,’ he told a group of corporate executives last fall.’
    • ‘As current chairman of the TransAfrica Forum board of directors, Glover was front and center at a reception Sunday afternoon at the Ensemble Theatre.’
    • ‘The research results make a lot of sense since a doctor's tie is front and center during all patient examinations while customarily being an afterthought when it comes to doing laundry.’
    • ‘I think some of the issues that really divided us, let's say even when I was running and before, are not quite front and center now.’
    • ‘But if that doesn't happen, then the Chinese bid will be front and center and so, the administration is trying to avoid making comments now until that occurs.’
    • ‘Those issues may not be front and center in the campaign.’
    • ‘The patriotic sentimentality would be front and center, and the deeper, universal themes of exile, betrayal, and justice would probably disappear from view.’
    • ‘The U.S. and Britain says it's not significant, but the question of whether the U.S. misled the world on Iraq will be front and center in Congress tomorrow.’
    • ‘The Martha drama and Team Bush's acute awareness of the gender gap ensures that gender will be front and center, if in often sneaky, subliminal and superficial ways in the coming campaign.’
    • ‘But do you think that there's a certain point where the media keeps, what is it, regurgitating the same details over and over to keep the story front and center.’
    • ‘There's a liberal candidate and there's a very conservative candidate and they have very different positions on all these important issues that should be front and center.’
    • ‘The 50-plus page dossier presented before Britain's House of Commons was also front and center at President Bush's meeting with his cabinet.’
    • ‘Paired with his winner's ring, the trophy will be front and center.’
    • ‘Remember that your logo - and, hopefully, theme line - are front and center on shirts and caps, and often on pants and sweatshirts and more.’
    • ‘By going back five quarters from that decision point, Elman keeps important real estate issues front and center with business unit leaders.’
    • ‘He decides who will be front and center as the image of U.S. foreign policy, and right now the resident conservative seems to be eclipsing the resident moderate.’
    • ‘The funny thing is that in the presidential campaign early on in the Democratic race in peculiar, the economic relationship with China really was front and center.’
    • ‘But, again, as long as the war is front and center in the media and as long as there is reason for it to be - and which maybe starting to - the balance may be a little out of whack at this point.’