Definition of frisk in English:

frisk

verb

  • 1[with object] (of a police officer or other official) pass the hands over (someone) in a search for hidden weapons, drugs, or other items.

    • ‘Schoolchildren could be frisked for weapons against their will as teachers are recruited into the crackdown on youth knife culture.’
    • ‘While the above examples have affected a few citizens, there is a much larger policy issue also at stake: the police have been authorized to stop and frisk any citizen whom they consider suspicious.’
    • ‘He held me tighter as his colleague proceeded to frisk me.’
    • ‘Policemen are frisking ticket holders at the gates as a security measure in the wake of threats to disrupt the first screenings of the film in the city.’
    • ‘He said after the shooting, police and federal agents who came aboard the plane thoroughly frisked passengers and then ordered them off the plane, ‘all of us with our hands on our heads’.’
    • ‘But I listened very carefully and don't remember that he actually said that those officers could then stop and frisk the individuals under suspicion.’
    • ‘As part of a countywide review, the court on Burneside Road, Kendal, now has an appointed security officer armed with a hand-held metal detector to frisk people entering the building.’
    • ‘According to zoo staff, they are unable to fully prevent the entry of plastic as they have no powers to frisk people entering the zoo.’
    • ‘He holstered the pistol and frisked her for weapons.’
    • ‘The 10th grader told Mr. Gober that he had been grabbed by a police officer, pushed against a wall, and frisked.’
    • ‘Most recently, he was frisked by officers looking for car thieves.’
    • ‘Sylvester, known as Rocky to friends in his Harlem neighborhood, was shot in the chest by the plainclothes cop, who was frisking the man's son.’
    • ‘It was by the same people who had frisked me the previous four times.’
    • ‘The federal police will also frisk pilgrims, search their belongings and maintain order within their camps.’
    • ‘Guests were frisked; their luggage was searched.’
    • ‘Officers frisked Barnes and made him stand with them near the police cars.’
    • ‘He frisked me, then twisted my arms, and placed handcuffs on me.’
    • ‘A machine gunner atop a Humvee kept his weapon trained on the truck and watched through binoculars as it came to a halt and troops frisked the driver and a companion.’
    • ‘Geoffrey froze as the third policeman came over and roughly frisked him.’
    • ‘One of them relieved Phelps of his gun and gun belt, while the other frisked him for hidden weapons or other ‘dangerous’ articles.’
    search, body-search, check, inspect, examine
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  • 2[no object] (of an animal or person) skip or leap playfully; frolic.

    ‘this did not deter the foal from frisking about’
    • ‘There was a little foal frisking beside its mother.’
    • ‘The Irish Sea has never been balmy, but the sheltered bay in Port Erin caught the sun and meant many happy summers spent frisking in the sand.’
    • ‘We were in Blackpool for a silly day trip, a tacky, idiotic day out to the seaside to frisk on the sands in mid-July.’
    • ‘‘She was caught in the bush, sir,’ he explained, glancing down at the dog that was still frisking about.’
    • ‘There was a man called Mr. Montaro Mori who was a student of the Tokyo Imperial University, which later became Tokyo University, and he and I and some others used to frisk around together.’
    • ‘Oh alright, I'll go and frisk, I suppose, if you insist.’
    • ‘You don't get to see them frisk like that around the Suffolk sheds.’
    • ‘Unlike horses, these unicorns would not move until after they had been fed and groomed, and then they would take themselves out to the giant corrals to frisk among themselves.’
    • ‘I look down to a meadow in Central Park and see tiny muffled moppets frisking around like children in a Dutch painting.’
    • ‘The premiere of Woolf Phrase, on a bare stage, featured Richard Siegal speaking passages by Virginia Woolf and frisking like a puppy.’
    • ‘For four years John Phelan allowed the beautiful freckled-faced colt to frisk and gambol to his hearts content in long meadow.’
    • ‘She says she can picture Charlie right now frisking about some green field of Heaven, wearing his loop of flowers.’
    • ‘Today, after cardiac surgery, the two children seem fine, happy and frisk about.’
    • ‘He watches them flirt, frolic, frisk and fondle.’
    • ‘River otters frisked in appreciation of winter's retreat.’
    frolic, gambol, cavort, caper, cut capers, sport, scamper, skip, dance, romp, trip, prance, leap, spring, hop, jump, bounce, bob
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    1. 2.1[with object](of an animal) move or wave (its tail or legs) playfully.
      ‘a horse was frisking his back legs like a colt’

noun

  • 1[in singular] An act of frisking someone.

    • ‘A frisk is a pat down on the outside of your clothing.’
    • ‘Lin and Huang as well as five other people were asked to line up for a frisk.’
    • ‘But such detection is allowed and is arguably a much lesser intrusion of privacy than, say, a frisk might be.’
    • ‘If he knows that he could be frisked, he can place a non-metal explosive in a location that will not be disclosed by a frisk.’
    • ‘Therefore, it is not even clear that frisks would have done anything to prevent the tragic deaths in Russia.’
    • ‘The police department has no way to know how many individuals have been frisked or whether those frisks are legal.’
    • ‘The frisks apply only to selected passengers - chosen at the screener's discretion.’
    • ‘The bouncers accordingly started a five minute long frisk to ensure that they were not smuggling in any bottles of spirits.’
    • ‘They will come and take you out to the back area, and they will do a bit of a frisk.’
    • ‘The government itself brought in an amendment to ensure that a search of a person, whether a strip search or frisk, would be carried out by a person of the same sex.’
    • ‘The panel addressed the issue of whether probable cause to seize an object can arise during a frisk when a police officer knows the object in question to be narcotics.’
    • ‘The quality of life for the richest 5 percent of the population was raised to dizzying heights, while poor and minority youth faced a daily routine of police stops, frisks and worse.’
  • 2A playful skip or leap.

    • ‘As the procession approached Hadleigh, he slipped off his horse, and leaped and took a frisk or two, as men commonly do in dancing.’

Origin

Early 16th century ( frisk): from obsolete frisk lively, frisky, from Old French frisque alert, lively, merry perhaps of Germanic origin. frisk, originally a slang term, dates from the late 18th century.

Pronunciation:

frisk

/frisk/