Main definitions of frieze in English

: frieze1frieze2

frieze1

noun

  • 1A broad horizontal band of sculpted or painted decoration, especially on a wall near the ceiling.

    • ‘Originally the side walls were decorated with relief friezes depicting The Education of Jupiter by Corybantes and Apollo as Shepherd to Admetus - themes that set the pastoral ideal in mythological terms.’
    • ‘The Museum of Old Aix is a fabulous building in its own right, with elaborate painted wooden ceilings and friezes, and a small and mildly interesting display about local crafts and customs.’
    • ‘As enlarged in the tenth century, the minster at Winchester was 250 feet long, with side-chapels, elaborate western towers, and carved and painted friezes.’
    • ‘The interior decoration was sumptuous with marble veneers, moulded stucco friezes, painted walls, and some remarkable mosaic floors, some of which survive.’
    • ‘A frieze of colored glass, mirror glass, and decorative leading ran around the room, culminating in the virtuoso display of the double doors.’
    • ‘There was a train featured on the frieze and that was my contribution to the decoration.’
    • ‘This is a spectacular building full of halls and passageways with walls covered in colourful friezes and hieroglyphics, while brooding granite statues of falcons guard the entrance doors.’
    • ‘A four-storey tower or turret, containing large circular rooms, rises out of the ground floor, and is adorned with friezes of classical and renaissance detail.’
    • ‘The Scottish National Portrait Gallery wants to extend the frieze in its entrance hall.’
    • ‘That these arches are triumphal is made clear by the frieze on the nearer of the two, which refers to Vespasian, whose joint triumph with Titus was well known from Josephus's account, discussed above.’
    • ‘Worse, almost all of the decorative friezes, achieved with so much care and expense only twenty years before, have been painted out; only that in the big, central Pre-Raphaelite room survives.’
    • ‘The three friezes with their ugly horizontal divisions, are also devoid of the supple rhythm whereby San artists achieved formal harmony, and this absence of flow creates a jarring staccato effect.’
    • ‘The dining room is extremely grand, with picture windows, friezes and a most elaborate ceiling.’
    • ‘It is an aesthetic glorified by ancient Greeks in their ceramics, Romans in their friezes and Renaissance artists in their sculptures.’
    • ‘And she put her new skills to use about her home - designing and painting friezes for her walls.’
    • ‘The building's common hall has a restored terrazzo tiled floor with walls which still retain the original painted friezes.’
    • ‘Figurative scenes taken directly from, or inspired by, Roman wall paintings and marble friezes are framed with elaborate borders of motifs and symbols derived from antiquity.’
    • ‘The frieze in the pediment on the outside of the building is depicted below.’
    • ‘A frieze at the top of the walls repeats the names of the founding, former and current members of Amfar's board.’
    • ‘Long, bronze relief friezes by Paul Day will be fixed to its walls.’
    1. 1.1 A horizontal paper strip mounted on a wall to give a similar effect.
      • ‘The Dutch Room gained its new name in 1906 after a wallpaper frieze of blue Dutchmen was installed.’
    2. 1.2Architecture The part of an entablature between the architrave and the cornice.
      • ‘The windows of the top storey were concealed within the frieze of the main entablature whilst the heads of those on the first floor were dropped to suit the new storey heights.’
      • ‘The cement entablature comprises four bas-relief friezes of two rows of Africans converging upon the beach, the Atlantic in front of them.’
      • ‘Each column supported an appropriate entablature, on the frieze of which was inscribed ‘Pro Patria,’ reminding the legislator of the end and object of his delegation.’
      • ‘This is not to suggest that new houses should incorporate classical columns, a carved frieze or cornice but some inventiveness is called for.’
      • ‘The entablature's architrave and frieze break out over each individual engaged column, emphasizing verticality, while the cornice breaks out over each pair to unify the pier-column unit.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: from French frise, from medieval Latin frisium, variant of frigium, from Latin Phrygium (opus) ‘(work) of Phrygia’.

Pronunciation

frieze

/frēz//friz/

Main definitions of frieze in English

: frieze1frieze2

frieze2

noun

  • Heavy, coarse woolen cloth with a nap, usually on one side only.

    • ‘The judges, it was said, had a most difficult task selecting the prizewinners, such was the excellent quality of frieze, flannel, yarn and items of clothing on show.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from French frise, from medieval Latin frisia, ‘Frisian wool’.

Pronunciation

frieze

/frēz//friz/