Definition of freeze in US English:

freeze

verb

  • 1no object (of a liquid) be turned into ice or another solid as a result of extreme cold.

    ‘in the winter the milk froze’
    • ‘Water freezes at a high temperature compared to other liquids.’
    • ‘Every drop of water has frozen & the wind is a terribly cold one.’
    • ‘It had been raining, and with the cold that night the rain had frozen into sleet on the road.’
    • ‘Europe continued to get colder; at the low point, in the 17th century, the Thames often froze so hard in winter that fairs were held on the ice.’
    • ‘Many bedrooms were completely unheated; water froze in the basins at night and frost formed on the sheets.’
    • ‘The streets were vacant, everyone preferred fireside warmth to temperatures so low that it only took a minute for a bucket of water to freeze solid.’
    • ‘He is reminiscing about the winter, when there is snow on the hills and the air is brittle with the cold and the frost freezes the water in his men's water bottles.’
    • ‘Ice that falls during the winter is almost always sleet - raindrops that freeze on the way down.’
    • ‘Since water expands as it freezes, ice forming inside pipes can break them.’
    • ‘The water may even freeze, producing frost on the inside surface of the window.’
    • ‘Moments later I reached the frozen pond and a mother doe and her fawn stand on the other side of it.’
    • ‘Between July and mid-November, polar bears lounge on the shores of Hudson Bay, living off their own fat while they wait for the sea to freeze up.’
    • ‘The water vapour would rise to the uppermost atmosphere where it freezes into tiny ice crystals.’
    • ‘Light rain froze almost immediately, coating parts of the city with black ice.’
    • ‘In severe winters the pub can be cut off by drifting snow for days at a time and the beer has been known to freeze in the pipes!’
    • ‘It's also why, when a pond freezes, the ice floats and the pond's inhabitants can endure the winter in liquid safety.’
    • ‘As we drove back to Minsk the rain was freezing to the window as soon as it hit.’
    • ‘Other than the odd times during the winter when the rivers or lakes froze, the sea and rivers were an abundant source of regular fresh food.’
    • ‘When the vapor condenses into rain or freezes to make snow, the precipitation is acid, which can fall into lakes.’
    • ‘The main job of the pool is to slake birds' thirst, not only on hot summer days but also in winter when natural sources of water may freeze solid.’
    1. 1.1with object Turn (a liquid) into ice or another solid.
    2. 1.2 (of something wet or containing liquid) become blocked, covered, or rigid with ice.
      ‘the pipes had frozen’
      • ‘Top up oil and water levels and make sure you put in enough anti-freeze to stop the engine freezing over.’
      • ‘Trees can be planted any time before the ground freezes.’
      • ‘You have to put cardboard up in the grates of your car to keep the engine block from freezing.’
      • ‘Try to spot any trouble with your pipes before it's too late, keeping your eye out for signs that may signify pipes that are beginning to freeze.’
      • ‘Planting can take place anytime the soil can be worked, as long as the plants' root structures have time to develop before the ground freezes.’
      • ‘If your pipes do freeze, shut off the main water valve that supplies your house before the pipes thaw.’
      • ‘The biggest problem people run into when the weather gets cold is frozen pipes.’
      • ‘It was very cold. A lot of the time the ground was frozen solid, and we couldn't do a thing.’
      • ‘‘We have had temperatures of minus three overnight and the track is frozen at the moment,’ he said today.’
      • ‘Along the way she saw a lovely patch of wild violets that had not yet been frozen by the frost.’
      turn into ice, ice over, ice up, solidify, harden
      ice-cold, ice-covered, icy, ice-bound, frosted
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3with object Cause (something wet or containing liquid) to become blocked, covered, or rigid with ice.
      with complement ‘the ground was frozen hard’
      • ‘"Dave Asquith came down at 10 am and the pitch was frozen solid.’
      • ‘Wild birds overwintering in your garden need clean water for drinking and bathing when natural water sources freeze solid.’
      • ‘After the ground freezes, remove old mulch and replace it with hay, evergreen boughs, or floating row covers.’
      • ‘In the North, winter cold freezes bare skin in seconds.’
    4. 1.4 Be or feel so cold that one is near death (often used hyperbolically)
      ‘you'll freeze to death standing there’
      • ‘We live in a northern climate and would freeze to death if we didn't clothe ourselves adequately.’
      • ‘After standing around at a bus stop in New Oxford Street freezing to death for twenty minutes waiting for a 25, I couldn't be bothered to wait any longer.’
      • ‘The real possibility that we were all going to freeze to death before anyone found us, was now uppermost in my mind.’
      • ‘She was right, he could very well freeze to death without a blanket tonight.’
      • ‘‘You two should come in, before you freeze to death,’ Andrew interrupted gently from the doorway.’
      • ‘I sat there, frozen, letting the chill seep over my body.’
      • ‘Doctors continued to marvel at the speedy recovery of a toddler who nearly froze to death last month.’
      • ‘Let's get you inside before you freeze to death.’
      • ‘It's minus 10 degrees outside, if he falls over he'll freeze to death!’
      • ‘I take a cardigan and a pashmina, because on many planes you can freeze to death from the air conditioning.’
      • ‘You're going to freeze in those wet clothes.’
      • ‘Outside, without clothing and in my condition, I would freeze to death before I could get a mile.’
      • ‘By the time I arrived I was frozen, and I barely cared that there were no trains indicated on the boards - at least I was somewhere warm.’
      • ‘It wasn't all that long ago that being poor meant you went hungry on a regular basis and froze all winter.’
      • ‘My husband, daughter and I have sat through films and nearly frozen in Bromley cinema.’
      • ‘I shivered, ‘It's getting cold out here, we better head in before we freeze to death.’’
      • ‘I was almost frozen before I found a taxi and escaped into the warm cab.’
      • ‘There's snow coming and we can't have the horses freeze to death.’
      • ‘We were frozen, so we dived into an Italian restaurant in the city to watch some football match and got ourselves warmed up.’
      • ‘He didn't want her to freeze to death in that little red dress of hers.’
      feel very cold, go numb with cold, turn blue with cold, shiver, shiver with cold, get chilled, get chilled to the bone, get chilled to the marrow
      View synonyms
    5. 1.5 (of the weather) be at or below freezing.
      ‘at night it froze again’
      • ‘‘Did you tell him that he could come inside?’ ‘Yes! It's beginning to freeze outside! Do you want to give him hypothermia?’’
      • ‘During the week, it had snowed, then thawed and then it froze and there was ice under all that water on the surface.’
      • ‘It's eased a little by now, although fun times will be ahead commuting tomorrow if it freezes tonight, even for those of us who live less than five kilometres from where we work.’
    6. 1.6with object Deprive (a part of the body) of feeling, especially by the application of a chilled anesthetic substance.
      • ‘It's amazing how numb your mouth can be when they freeze it.’
      • ‘The mouth and throat are numbed up or frozen with a local anesthetic until all cough and gag reflexes are gone.’
      • ‘His mouth was frozen numb from eating so much ice cream.’
      • ‘He goes to another hospital next Wednesday where they will give him an epidural to try and freeze the affected area which should give him pain relief for a month at a time.’
    7. 1.7with object Treat (someone) with a cold manner; stare coldly at (someone)
      ‘she would freeze him with a look when he tried to talk to her’
  • 2with object Store (something) at a very low temperature in order to preserve it.

    ‘the cake can be frozen’
    • ‘Tarragon also keeps its flavor well when frozen or can be preserved in vinegar.’
    • ‘All tissue was frozen immediately in liquid nitrogen and stored at - 75°C.’
    • ‘You can also cook chicken breasts in advance and refrigerate or freeze them for later use.’
    • ‘The tissue was immediately frozen and stored in liquid nitrogen until DNA extraction.’
    • ‘The research project follows last year's arrival of the first baby in Britain to be born from a mature egg harvested from its mother, frozen, then fertilised at a later date.’
    • ‘Stew recipes are flexible and can be doubled and tripled and the leftovers frozen to be enjoyed later as a cost and time effective meal.’
    • ‘Check your garlic, too: Soft cloves can be minced, mixed with olive oil and frozen for future use.’
    • ‘Most food is frozen or pre-cooked to preserve it - a great shame.’
    • ‘If you want to freeze it, allow the soup to cool before pouring it into a sealable tub and putting it into the freezer.’
    • ‘One of the best methods for preserving herbs is to freeze them.’
    • ‘The cells were frozen and stored for weeks to months.’
    • ‘Allow all frozen foods such as poultry and large joints of meat to thaw out completely in a refrigerator.’
    • ‘The family freezes some soft fruit to allow preserves to be produced all year long, while the jams are handmade in small batches, creating variation between each batch.’
    • ‘Plastic freezer bags and rigid freezer containers are convenient for freezing vegetables.’
    • ‘All specimens must be securely packaged and kept refrigerated but not frozen during transport.’
    • ‘If you do buy convenience foods, such as frozen pizzas, lunch meats or soups, choose those with reduced fat and sodium.’
    • ‘The most significant discovery was the minimal difference in Vitamin C content between fresh and frozen peas.’
    • ‘Either cook or freeze raw meat, fish and poultry within two days of purchasing it.’
    • ‘If time is at a premium, try cooking a huge pot of soup on the weekend and storing it in the refrigerator for a few days or freezing it for longer storage.’
    • ‘Ideally, though, you should go for high-quality fresh or frozen foods which do not have preservatives, rather than their chill-cabinet counterparts.’
    deep-freeze, quick-freeze, freeze-dry, put in the freezer, pack in ice, put on ice, ice
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1no object, with complement (of food) be able to be preserved by freezing.
      ‘this soup freezes well’
      • ‘Some herbs freeze beautifully. These include chives, thyme and basil.’
      • ‘Simon said while some customers bought a few items, others took up to 16 loaves to fill their freezer, as the bread would freeze very well.’
      • ‘This is a beautifully coloured, quick and tasty soup, which freezes well.’
      • ‘All these fruits freeze well except strawberries, which should be saved for the summer months.’
      • ‘Once cool, the pie will freeze happily; defrost and reheat until hot all the way through.’
      • ‘Cooked wild rice freezes well, so you can conveniently keep it on hand for gourmet dishes.’
      • ‘I have found that mint does not freeze well, so I always dry it instead (chives freezes well but doesn't dry well, basil freezes and dries well).’
      • ‘It's easy to bake, being essentially a cake more than a steamed pudding, it comes with a spectacularly simple sauce, it freezes well and it reheats like a dream for seconds and thirds.’
      • ‘Pesto freezes well, and will keep for several months.’
  • 3no object Become suddenly motionless or paralyzed with fear or shock.

    ‘Mathewson froze on the spot, unable to take the next step’
    • ‘Everyone in the room freezes, and looks over at me as I stand slowly.’
    • ‘While the two other women ran, Zhao testified that she froze, fearing she would be shot.’
    • ‘It was a little nerve wracking, but at least I didn't freeze up, which is what I was worried about.’
    • ‘I was frozen to the spot, sweat dripping down my cold skin.’
    • ‘We really haven't had professional pictures of our kids taken because they generally freeze up in front of the camera.’
    • ‘The clerk freezes, dropping the cup she's holding.’
    • ‘He'd begun to lower himself into one of the chairs facing her desk when he stopped, frozen in his tracks.’
    • ‘She reached the stairs and turned to Chris, who was frozen with shock and fear.’
    • ‘Suddenly she asked whether there was someone else in the room and I froze in terror.’
    • ‘I was frozen against that wall, staring at her, wide-eyed and overwhelmed.’
    • ‘Many stumbled aimlessly through the main square, their faces frozen in blank shock as if unable to believe what they were seeing.’
    • ‘For a moment, there was silence in the centre of Potters Bar as everyone nearby froze at the shock of the noise and juddering force of the impact.’
    • ‘I can be getting on really well with a girl but as soon as I get an inkling that there might be a chance of anything happening, I just freeze up.’
    • ‘Everything inside of her just freezes up with fear.’
    • ‘Tyler was about to tell her about their mother, but froze as he looked at his little sister.’
    • ‘A schoolgirl told how she froze with fear as she was allegedly molested by a drunken man in an early hours attack.’
    • ‘Her smile suddenly froze on her face, and all of the warmth and teasing drained from her.’
    • ‘Eva completely froze for a moment and a look of panic crossed her face.’
    • ‘I froze momentarily, startled by the sight.’
    • ‘I froze like a deer in headlights at the top of the stairs.’
    stop dead, stop in one's tracks, stop, stand still, stand stock still, go rigid, become motionless, become paralysed
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1 Stop moving when ordered or directed.
      • ‘They all held up AK 47 at them, ordering them to freeze, and the helicopter also warned them of a sniper.’
      • ‘When he ordered everyone to freeze, they froze.’
      stop dead, stop in one's tracks, stop, stand still, stand stock still, go rigid, become motionless, become paralysed
      View synonyms
  • 4with object Hold (something) at a fixed level or in a fixed state for a period of time.

    ‘new spending on defense was to be frozen’
    • ‘The trade unions have now agreed that wages are to be frozen at current levels for the next two years.’
    • ‘Sligo Chamber of Commerce and Industry has called on the local authorities to freeze commercial rates at their current level.’
    • ‘So long as the prices of consumer goods were frozen below free-market levels, producers had little incentive to bring their goods to market.’
    • ‘Commercial rates should be frozen at their current level for the forthcoming year’
    • ‘He even had no objection in principle to Luxembourg's compromise proposal to freeze Britain's rebate at slightly below its present level for the lifetime of the budget.’
    • ‘For example, they would freeze benefits from Social Security at their current levels and fund them with a federal retail sales tax.’
    • ‘The Bush administration would freeze funding at its current level, $34 million.’
    • ‘In addition, to help with the council's budget position, members have agreed that all allowances will be frozen at their present level and there will be no increases next year.’
    • ‘The Government recognised the need for a period of stability, which is why we froze tariffs for 5 years, until 2005.’
    • ‘Irish salmon fishermen are calling on the Minister to at least freeze quotas at the 2002 level whilst the current stock position is evaluated.’
    • ‘The cost of new cars is currently frozen at the same level as June 2003, making the New Year the perfect time to bag a good deal.’
    • ‘Measures taken so far have included axing 450 posts, freezing recruitment and limiting the number of pre-operation overnight stays for patients.’
    • ‘The chancellor said the first step could be to freeze up to £1 billion of debts later this week owed by those countries hardest hit by the Boxing Day disaster.’
    • ‘The party would also restore free dental checks, and prescription charges would be frozen pending a review of the level of charges and categories of exemptions.’
    • ‘Funding for Children's Aid Societies was frozen, and staff salaries were kept at 1997 levels.’
    • ‘Stanford University in California has recently opted to freeze all salaries in order to help finances.’
    • ‘In the meantime, careful planning may make it possible to freeze the capital tax base at its existing level.’
    • ‘The employer contribution is frozen at the level of 6.5 percent.’
    • ‘Some companies have pledged to freeze their rates in 2005, but most are likely to implement further hikes if wholesale gas prices continue to rise as expected.’
    • ‘It also virtually freezes funding for domestic discretionary programs other than homeland security.’
    fix, suspend, hold, peg, set
    View synonyms
    1. 4.1 Prevent (assets) from being used for a period of time.
      ‘the charity's bank account has been frozen’
      • ‘The EU visa ban imposes travel restrictions on top government and ruling party officials, as well as freezing their assets.’
      • ‘European governments responded by freezing their assets.’
      • ‘They agreed to freeze the assets of suspected terrorist groups " without delay".’
      • ‘The firm will likely be placed under court receivership, which would install trustees and freeze all company assets.’
      • ‘The US government has frozen assets worth three-quarters of a million dollars.’
      • ‘The FTC has requested a temporary restraining order to freeze the defendants' assets and possibly reimburse consumers.’
      • ‘It would freeze assets and impose a travel ban on anyone identified as a suspect by the commission.’
      • ‘In this particular case, the business folded because the assets were frozen.’
      • ‘Government instructions, bankers say, were to freeze assets now and ask questions later.’
      • ‘These permit a Garda chief superintendent to make a case to the High Court for an order to freeze, and where appropriate dispose of, the proceeds of crime.’
      • ‘Mr Davidson's lawyers will also apply to vary the order freezing his assets.’
      • ‘The government can freeze assets or proscribe groups if a UN Security Council freezing order has been issued.’
      • ‘To back up its powers of scrutiny it can compel witnesses to provide information, freeze assets, suspend trustees and, in the final resort, dissolve a charity.’
      • ‘In February, the SEC persuaded a federal judge in Florida to freeze their assets and filed civil fraud charges against them and six other defendants.’
      • ‘The railroad won an injunction to freeze Dringer's assets, halting his lucrative business.’
      • ‘He has had his assets frozen by a previous court, which limited his spending to £1,000 a week.’
      • ‘A fear that many international investors have is that their assets may be frozen or seized by a government.’
      • ‘The company's bank accounts were frozen by a court order some months ago, leaving it with no option but to sell some of its businesses in order to raise cash.’
      • ‘The prosecution told the court that by the time action had been taken to freeze the Swiss bank account, HK $2.3 million had been withdrawn.’
      • ‘Company bank accounts and assets have been frozen by Russian courts to prevent Yukos from selling businesses to fund the bill.’
    2. 4.2 Stop (a moving image) at a particular frame when filming or viewing.
      ‘the camera will set fast shutter speeds to freeze the action’
      • ‘The perceptual realm that we sense beyond the sphere of focused vision is as important as the focused image that can be frozen by the camera.’
      • ‘She hit the pause button, and I saw my own foolish-looking face, past her shoulder, frozen on the screen.’
      • ‘The image of those two was frozen on the screen.’
      • ‘The last image, a frozen frame, is of his sad, sweet face alongside the flowers.’
      • ‘The image of that mine, frozen on the screen, haunted his thoughts.’
      • ‘If you freeze the image near the start of Shadows, you'll see that it's really an abstract film.’
    3. 4.3no object (of a computer screen) become temporarily locked because of system problems.
      • ‘The format went well, but the system froze during the file installation.’
      • ‘I have a system that freezes during the reboot process.’
      • ‘PC screens froze and, with little other choice left, the event was cancelled.’
      • ‘If your computer freezes after you have bought, but before you have sold, you may lose millions in the transaction.’
      • ‘But my computer froze up in the middle of the post, and I lost everything I'd written.’
      • ‘If the screen freezes or you experience system lockups it might be due to the video card.’
      • ‘This means I can actually work on writing for long periods of time without my computer freezing or crashing on me.’
      • ‘Every time you click on a window to shut it down five more windows are opened, ultimately making your computer freeze or even crash.’
      • ‘My computer freezes again, before announcing that it's going to do a cache clean-up.’
      • ‘I wrote half of this chapter and then my computer froze before I got to save it.’
      • ‘With the small amount of RAM that they had, if there were too many programs running at the same time the computer would freeze, and shut down.’
      • ‘This document contains recommendations on what to do if the computer frequently freezes or completely halts.’
      • ‘It takes 15 minutes for computers to download an image - if the screen doesn't freeze up first.’
      • ‘If you fill up the hard drive, the system freezes up, and there's no way a user can undo it.’
      • ‘The system was always freezing and changing homepages in Internet Explorer.’
      • ‘But then my screen freezes and the display is unreadable.’
      • ‘Keep in mind that your DVR will act like the computer it really is, and as such, may reboot occasionally or the screen may momentarily freeze.’
      • ‘Every time I link to the website my computer freezes.’
      • ‘The computer freezes and I've lost the paragraph.’
      • ‘Screens froze, buttons took three presses to function and, most distressingly, half my address book made itself invisible.’

noun

  • 1An act of holding or being held at a fixed level or in a fixed state.

    ‘workers faced a pay freeze’
    • ‘During this same period, the Giuliani administration had imposed a two-year wage freeze on all city workers.’
    • ‘The meeting also approved a massive rise in council tax of more than 18.5 per cent - as well as a freeze on grants for arts and voluntary groups in the city.’
    • ‘Motorists were winners in yesterday's Budget with a six-month freeze on fuel prices and the Chancellor signalling support for road-building.’
    • ‘While the Government has a freeze on public sector recruitment, it says it is willing to recruit frontline health staff depending on the resources available.’
    • ‘Parallel to the wage freeze, the government has implemented a programme of public spending cuts unprecedented in the history of the Netherlands.’
    • ‘No personnel lay - offs are planned but a recruitment freeze has been implemented.’
    • ‘But it confirmed that the planned cuts will mean a reduction in existing staff rather than a freeze on planned growth.’
    • ‘The admission of a recruitment freeze is surprising because Cisco has almost tripled its workforce in the past two years, increasing its head count by 30,000 workers.’
    • ‘In the 2002 pay round, the company proposed a freeze on wages and cuts to conditions such as shift allowances and overtime rates.’
    • ‘The board implemented a hiring freeze and deferred cost-of-living raises for its staff.’
    • ‘Magalios said news of the tuition freeze was a surprise, considering the tone of the meeting she had with Hedderson March 11.’
    • ‘The Chancellor announced a freeze on stamp duty rates and inheritance tax rates, but an increase on the inheritance threshold to £263,000.’
    • ‘Last Friday, the IMF ended a three-year freeze on foreign aid by granting Kenya a $252.8 million loan.’
    • ‘On August 15, 1971, more or less out of the blue, President Nixon declared a freeze on wages and prices.’
    • ‘However, none of the changes have been implemented because of the freeze on public sector recruitment announced in the Budget.’
    • ‘Tuition fees in B.C. have skyrocketed ever since the Liberal government lifted a six-year tuition freeze in 2002.’
    • ‘But the company has had a freeze on all raises for nearly two years now.’
    • ‘The task force called for a freeze on all measures which would see alcohol becoming more available on the grounds that further availability would increase alcohol problems.’
    • ‘The company also plans to impose a pay freeze for its remaining 1,400 employees.’
    • ‘The government has imposed a two and a half year pay freeze on teachers.’
    fix, suspension, hold
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1
      short for freeze-frame
  • 2A period of frost or very cold weather.

    ‘the big freeze surprised the weathermen’
    • ‘Motorists are being advised to take extra care on the roads this week as the big freeze drifts south.’
    • ‘Hundreds of gritters were heading out on the roads last night as Britain began gearing up for the big freeze, which will begin to sweep across the country today - a day later than expected.’
    • ‘Apply the coverings in the evening when freezes are forecast and remove them the following morning after the sun warms the air.’
    • ‘The big freeze showed no sign of ending yesterday with savage frosts overnight and forecasters predicting temperatures as low as minus 20C.’
    • ‘While we escaped the big freeze, France was hardest hit by blizzards that swept Europe.’
    • ‘The big freeze came as workers were leaving offices and the roads became treacherous within minutes.’
    • ‘The big freeze is finally on its way out, but last night's temperatures - the lowest yet - brought chaos to road and rail.’
    • ‘Many problems related to the May 28 frost in 1992 were related to the cool, damp weather that followed the freeze.’
    • ‘In the early 1900s, much of Florida's citrus industry moved south to areas of the state that seemed the least prone to ruinous freezes.’
    • ‘The big freeze had already begun to affect airline passengers yesterday with hundreds left stranded after snow and strong winds grounded flights to Europe and north America.’
    • ‘Aquatic life that would otherwise be killed by a freeze survives.’
    • ‘Our climate, with its extremes of summer heat and drought, early freezes in the fall and late cold snaps in the spring, combined with severe weather, all conspire to damage and stress trees.’
    • ‘The big freeze continued to cause misery for motorists, school children and holidaymakers today.’
    • ‘Then, on the 22nd of the month, the mercury plummeted, heralding the beginning of a big freeze which would last for weeks.’
    • ‘Damaging winter freezes are virtually unheard of.’
    • ‘The chance of a freeze is low now, which is good news for those who planted early.’
    • ‘The significance of winter's lowest temperatures decreases as we shift from places where winter freezes may kill many plants to areas where freezes merely mean frost on lawns and windshields.’
    • ‘The fall garden session starts the last Saturday of August and continues through the first freeze, usually in November.’
    • ‘A freeze set in on the 20th and 21st, and this made the higher ground particularly slippery and dangerous.’
    • ‘It will highlight the fact that we are still living in the great ice age, which has included periods of both hot and cold weather, and will examine the two most recent big freezes in 1947 and 1963.’
    cold snap, spell of cold weather, freeze-up, frost
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • freeze one's blood

    • Fill (or be filled) with a sudden feeling of great fear or horror.

      • ‘The heavy silence descended once more, and Quin felt his blood freeze in his veins.’
      • ‘The moment I stepped in, my blood froze in shock and I couldn't move.’
      • ‘While I haven't read the story in question, as described here it freezes my blood.’
      • ‘I laughed lightly, though memory of my nightmare seemed to freeze my blood.’
      • ‘When Nazar saw the tiger, his blood froze, and everything went dark before his eyes.’
      • ‘I twisted my head to look at her- and my blood froze.’
      • ‘Every sideways glance she stole in his direction was enough to make her blood freeze.’
      • ‘And just at that moment, she heard the opening notes of a haunting melody that froze her blood.’
      • ‘Brian looked back at the empty chairs, a sudden terrifying thought making his blood freeze.’
      • ‘Starting to her feet, her eyes met a sight which froze her blood with terror.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • freeze someone out

    • Behave in a hostile or obstructive way so as to exclude someone from something.

      • ‘Volunteers who went to the aid of a seaside carnival have claimed they were frozen out.’
      • ‘She was kicked out of her house and then her friends froze her out, ignoring her emails and phone calls.’
      • ‘So, even if he lost his regular place, it is unlikely that he would be frozen out entirely.’
      • ‘The FBI investigation is based on claims by a senior army contracting official who claims she was frozen out of decisions when she questioned the contracts.’
      • ‘Early in his marriage, Philip found palace life inexplicable and was baffled by the way he was frozen out of many activities.’
      • ‘Democrats froze him out of important committee assignments, and were also not eager to help get his bills passed.’
      • ‘However, he was then frozen out of the US space programme because of his erratic character.’
      • ‘The Times quoted big business lobbyists claiming they were frozen out during the Clinton years of ‘over-regulation.’’
      • ‘Ackerman listened politely to Cowan's critique - then froze him out of the rest of the discussion.’
      • ‘For example, they might ostracize victims by freezing them out of the lunchroom seating arrangements, ignoring them on the playground, or shunning them when slumber party invitations are handed out.’
      • ‘However, champion skater Peter Baker has been frozen out of world class competition - because he is too old.’
      • ‘Dettmer said workers were ‘furious’ they had been frozen out of Government discussions on the industry's future.’
      • ‘The NUT has been frozen out because it refuses to sign up to the government's proposals over classroom assistants.’
      • ‘The Scottish lawyer did not trust the media-savvy MP, and froze him out from frontline decision-making.’
      • ‘Guardians of the New Forest have been frozen out of a vital selection process as the area prepares to become a National Park.’
      • ‘According to O'Neill, he and other moderate Cabinet members were frozen out of most decision-making early on, even when those decisions related directly to their domains.’
      • ‘But Sandy refused to freeze him out of the conversation and kept putting a paternalistic arm on his shoulder and buying him more lager.’
      • ‘Will he be frozen out of the debates, as he was in 2000?’
      • ‘Olive, full of hatred for Ransom and now passionately attached to the girl, tries to freeze him out.’
      • ‘Mr Libeskind wrote to the New York Times last week saying that, contrary to reports, he had not been frozen out after a series of disagreements with Mr Childs' firm of architects.’
      • ‘The original American producers say they were frozen out of the show because the Canadian government offers huge financial incentives to lure productions away from the United States.’
      • ‘I thought we had been frozen out since that unfortunate episode with the painting.’
      • ‘His estate was auctioned for less than $4m, friends melted away, and his golf club froze him out.’
      • ‘After seven brief appearances as substitute under Nicky Law, Wolleaston was frozen out by Bryan Robson, who announced he would not be part of his plans.’
      • ‘They have always said that they were frozen out and left in the dark about how the case was proceeding.’
      • ‘These women resented the intrusion of this strange woman from Dublin and were initially most uncooperative, and, in fact, deliberately froze her out of their circle.’
      • ‘Siobhan…left in 2001, claiming she was frozen out by Keisha and Mutya, old schoolmates with whom she had formed the band in 1998.’
      • ‘Mummy never used my father as a threat to get me to do what she wanted, neither did she hug me when he was looking yet freeze me out when he wasn't.’
      • ‘After the Australia tour of '99, Costello was frozen out, never to return under Gatland.’
      exclude, leave out, shut out, cut out, neglect, ignore, ostracize, reject, disown, spurn, slight, snub, shun, cut, cut dead, turn one's back on, cold-shoulder, give someone the cold shoulder, leave out in the cold
      View synonyms

Origin

Old English frēosan (in the phrase hit frēoseth ‘it is freezing’), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch vriezen and German frieren, from an Indo-European root shared by Latin pruina ‘hoar frost’ and frost.

Pronunciation

freeze

/frēz//friz/