Definition of fraternize in English:

fraternize

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • Associate or form a friendship with someone, especially when one is not supposed to.

    ‘she ignored Elisabeth's warning glare against fraternizing with the enemy’
    • ‘Lawyers and judges, even in quite large cities, usually know each other quite well and regularly fraternise socially.’
    • ‘My friend doesn't remember her and doesn't recall any of the football players fraternising with any of the local celebs.’
    • ‘But as hinted before, they are but one of many examples of operator groupies - girls who consider fraternising with staff a bigger attraction than the rides themselves.’
    • ‘Once again he was stuck fraternizing with the enemy, and once again where he should have felt guilt he felt a tinge of familiarity.’
    • ‘And as such, it's easy to get lost in the work - studying tape, charting tendencies, game-planning, building relationships with players and fraternizing with coaches.’
    • ‘In our society we isolate judges… All of a sudden a lawyer at 40 goes from fraternising with friends to becoming a judge.’
    • ‘More numerous than the gentry-become-townsmen were the burgesses who fraternised with the gentry.’
    • ‘I was never a Mob lawyer, I never fraternized with my clients and I never even went to a club to collect money for my fees.’
    • ‘A 20-year veteran of the peace movement, he had learned one of the inviolable laws of the left: thou shalt not fraternize with big business.’
    • ‘The elite wanted to fraternize with the Pakistanis who had accepted Urdu as the national language.’
    • ‘He seemed to assume, for example, if Russia withdrew unilaterally from the first world war, German soldiers would begin to fraternise with their former opponents and would be therefore moved to stop fighting.’
    • ‘Because they say I'd fraternized with the prisoners.’
    • ‘Once the agreement is in place, then, and only then, will we have the time and the mutual inclination to teach, educate, socialize, fraternize, and speak the language of peace.’
    • ‘All along the front line soldiers walked spontaneously into no-man's land to fraternise with the enemy.’
    • ‘He must remain a neutral observer of the game and not fraternise with teams or team officials.’
    • ‘And does Ashley know he's fraternising with the criminal underworld?’
    • ‘He was a private person who kept himself to himself and didn't fraternise with neighbours but would acknowledge them.’
    • ‘She was fraternizing with a member of the band and it's unacceptable.’
    • ‘You are sharing a lot of information here, wouldn't this be considered fraternizing with the enemy?’
    • ‘If your company employs contractors to perform physical security, then you may have policies in place that prevent contractor guards from fraternizing with company employees.’
    associate, mix, mingle, consort, socialize, go around, keep company, rub shoulders
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 17th century: from French fraterniser, from medieval Latin fraternizare, from Latin fraternus ‘brotherly’ (see fraternal).

Pronunciation

fraternize

/ˈfradərˌnīz//ˈfrædərˌnaɪz/