Definition of frankly in US English:

frankly

adverb

  • 1In an open, honest, and direct manner.

    ‘she talks very frankly about herself’
    • ‘Mirza's desire to speak so frankly about certain aspects of Islamic culture has upset some people.’
    • ‘Go to any campus and ask students what they think about the political party and they will frankly tell you.’
    • ‘I can tell you quite frankly that the stuff from our childhoods is not to be blamed on us.’
    • ‘It is time that the parish council told council tax payers what is going on - openly and frankly.’
    • ‘Last night, in an interview to accompany the new portrait, the prince spoke frankly about both issues.’
    • ‘As an Independent councillor he will be able to express frankly what Walcot people say they need’
    • ‘It was so unbelievably, horrifically brilliant that we were frankly worried we might have dreamt it.’
    • ‘At the very first knock, both the student leaders came out of the room and talked to me very frankly.’
    • ‘With my most eloquent voice I asked her, quite frankly, if she'd lost her dog.’
    candidly, directly, straightforwardly, straight from the shoulder, forthrightly, openly, honestly, truthfully, without dissembling, without beating about the bush, without mincing one's words, without prevarication, point-blank, matter-of-factly, unequivocally, unambiguously, categorically, plainly, explicitly, clearly
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    1. 1.1sentence adverb Used to emphasize the truth of a statement, however unpalatable or shocking this may be.
      ‘frankly, I was pleased to leave’
      • ‘The glorification of violence, bad language and sexism I find quite frankly appalling.’
      • ‘The problem with moisturising your whole body is that it can be time consuming and quite frankly, a tad tedious.’
      • ‘I've found them to be helpful and informative, and quite frankly I'm not that paranoid.’
      • ‘I still don't know if it's a bus or a train, but I frankly don't care anymore, I just want a ticket.’
      • ‘That is frankly a ridiculous statement with less foundation than most of the ones that I make.’
      • ‘I wasn't expecting all that much, frankly, but in the event I was highly impressed.’
      • ‘Quite frankly, American film studios are going about this remake business all wrong.’
      • ‘Most of the others left my life because I was, frankly, too scary and horrid.’
      • ‘That is the crux of the problem to me, because frankly, not all films are meant for television.’
      • ‘It is a secular impulse for a secular society and it is, frankly, boring.’
      • ‘I left the cinema half an hour before the end of the film in disgust, anger and, quite frankly, boredom.’
      • ‘After a shaky first hour that, quite frankly, bored me to tears, the film ended up moving me to tears.’
      • ‘Now the people with alternative views, quite frankly, have given up caring.’
      • ‘I'm no longer struck with a feeling that this will only get worse, because frankly it's about as bad as it can be.’
      • ‘This is strong language and frankly I fail to see any justification for it.’
      • ‘I think the papers obsessions with the sex lives of our public figures is, quite frankly, boring.’
      • ‘She was disappointed by the basket of bread which came with it, though, which was quite frankly, soggy.’
      • ‘These people have absolutely no power in it and quite frankly I think it's a waste of time.’
      • ‘This frankly ridiculous trend of changing your name to something edifyingly stupid overwhelms me.’
      • ‘I'm sure I will too, if I do go on to have children in a world which frankly doesn't need any more babies.’
      to be frank, to be honest, to tell you the truth, to be truthful, in all honesty, in all sincerity, as it happens
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Usage

See hopefully

Pronunciation

frankly

/ˈfræŋkli//ˈfraNGklē/