Main definitions of forge in English

: forge1forge2

forge1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Make or shape (a metal object) by heating it in a fire or furnace and beating or hammering it.

    • ‘There are also shots of a gold-adorned cleric baptising a baby and a new mother holding her infant, both sporting bracelets forged from the precious metal.’
    • ‘While at Arthur Leek, he used his skills as a tool-maker to forge the hammers and chisels he still uses today.’
    • ‘These blessed states are partly a free gift and partly earned: we travail to forge the metal which lightning may strike.’
    • ‘The metalworkers' yard nearby, which forges and shapes metal to various forms, is unable to fire his poetic imagination, on this occasion.’
    • ‘When he touched it with his hands the door gave way at once though its bands were forged in fire.’
    • ‘I had one forged from a white metal, capable of piercing almost any armour worn by man.’
    • ‘I wasn't sure I knew how to forge a metal like that, let alone how to make the synthetic compounds that made the stock and foregrip.’
    • ‘The hilt was of the strongest metal, and was forged in the manner of Dragon Wings, flaring towards the point of the Sword.’
    • ‘While many of his peers buy their Damascus steel from artisans, Kirk forges his own and shapes it to perfection.’
    • ‘There was knowledge a plenty in the area about how to mine, refine, and forge the metal.’
    • ‘She taught me to forge iron bells out of nails hammered into the shape of feathers.’
    • ‘For the tests, an 11 in. square cast ingot was forged to a 4 in. thick slab.’
    • ‘Tight faceting suggests plumage, but those feathers could be forged of sheet metal.’
    • ‘When his weightbelt was forged for him in the Bessemer blast furnace at Cargo Fleet, it was transported as an abnormal load down the A1 on a low-loader with a Scammell tractor at either end.’
    • ‘For a dark blade such as this, the metal is forged in a magical fire of burning ice.’
    • ‘He forged the metal with his own hands and put into it his will to rule all of the lands around him and for his sons to rule all of the lands around them.’
    • ‘Offerings have to be prepared four times in the course of the kris making: when the job is about to begin, to forge the metal, to plate it and to bathe it.’
    • ‘One of the Corps most iconic recruiting commercials showed a sword being forged by pressure and fire, a metaphor for the process of boot camp and training.’
    • ‘In the former case, the figure's head was chopped off and posted as a trophy, and the remaining metal was forged into bullets.’
    • ‘I couldn't forge the metal or work the lathes, even the basic woodworking tools were far enough removed from the convenience of power tools that I had trouble with them.’
    hammer out, beat into shape, found, cast, mould, model
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Create (a relationship or new conditions)
      ‘the two women forged a close bond’
      ‘the country is forging a bright new future’
      • ‘Lord Jenkins of Hillhead was an admired writer whose biographies centred on the world in which he forged a successful career of his own.’
      • ‘He forged a successful freelance career, alongside the researching which went towards his new book.’
      • ‘The successful practices have forged a close working relationship between Public Works, Police, Fire, and Health Departments.’
      • ‘In that time they have forged a successful team, having spent twelve years at the popular Brewers Arms, in Wanborough.’
      • ‘Unlike many other celebrity writers, however, she is skilful at creating characters and forging a convincing emotional core at the centre of her novels.’
      • ‘Yet quality serves not only to forge successful interconnections within the industry, but also to create points of disconnection.’
      • ‘Government has reaffirmed its commitment to forge strong ties with the private sector in order to create employment and reduce poverty.’
      • ‘He forged a strong relationship with the Jessop family in the years after the tragedy, and urged his son-in-law to remarry.’
      • ‘Other Jews forged successful lives in the colony, especially during the gold rushes, as gold exporters, businessmen or landowners.’
      • ‘This practical, no-nonsense attitude typified Mrs Du Faur, who forged strong ties with students and colleagues alike.’
      • ‘Twenty years ago there was talk about using our five stations and new satellite technology to forge a strong, national, progressive voice.’
      • ‘Here is something more than raw material from which a successful literature was forged.’
      • ‘But coached by Francis Crook, he has succeeded in forging a remarkably successful running career.’
      • ‘These and other factors have helped forge a strong and enduring bond of good will and friendship between our two countries.’
      • ‘The Kingdom of England was forged in the furnace of Viking invasions.’
      • ‘The sexy star, who has forged a successful solo career outside the band, said their last album was probably their last.’
      • ‘Yorkshire players past and present are expected to forge much stronger links together if the seal of approval is given to the formation of the club's first Players' Association.’
      • ‘In America, where there has been a shift away from big studios towards independent film-makers, Swinton has forged a successful career in both areas.’
      • ‘That's when we forged a stronger union in terms of our opinions and how we work together.’
      • ‘Along the way we have shared many adventures and forged many strong and lasting friendships.’
  • 2Produce a copy or imitation of (a document, signature, banknote, or work or art) for the purpose of deception.

    • ‘The two men were arrested on suspicion of living off immoral earnings and having forged documents.’
    • ‘Legitimate documents might be stolen from a living person or a deceased person, while forged documents might involve changed names or variations of real names.’
    • ‘The brother of the Chief Constable of Humberside was today beginning a three-year jail sentence for forging banknotes.’
    • ‘Documents evidencing the latter agreements were forged or fraudulent.’
    • ‘Because 14,000 jurisdictions produce them with no national standard, forging birth certificates used to be easy.’
    • ‘He was ultimately tried for perjuring himself and also forging these documents that she supposedly signed, these release forms.’
    • ‘This could, with considerable effort, be used to forge certificates and signatures.’
    • ‘The signatures were forged by the defendant, who also signed the documents as having witnessed the signatures.’
    • ‘She has, in fact, forged the signature of her father on documents for obtaining the loan and when her husband learns the truth, he starts an argument with her.’
    • ‘The plaintiff could easily have forged her partner's signature to it.’
    • ‘Here the servants of the customer, an old woman who was too frail to look after her affairs, forged her signature on cheques drawn on her account.’
    • ‘Is it actually possible to forge corporate documents simply by cutting and pasting them on a computer?’
    • ‘So, as we get better at trying to check passports and illegally forged documents, they're going to try harder to recruit to get around that problem.’
    • ‘An action had been brought by the second company against a bank, alleging that the wife had forged the husband's signature on cheques.’
    • ‘And because it is an unsigned copy, they don't even have to forge a signature.’
    • ‘Seven per cent confessed to assuming another person's identity through forging their signature on letters or cheques.’
    • ‘His friends broke several laws by transporting Abbey's corpse without a permit, interring him illegally on federal land, and forging a death certificate.’
    • ‘The documents were forged certificates relating to loss of earnings totalling €600.’
    • ‘Now, you conceded that you had forged various documents.’
    • ‘There is no need to rule whether these documents were forged or not.’
    fake, faked, false, counterfeit, imitation, reproduction, replica, copied
    sham, bogus, dummy, ersatz, invalid
    phoney, dud, pretend, crooked
    fake, falsify, counterfeit, copy fraudulently, copy, imitate, reproduce, replicate, simulate
    View synonyms

noun

  • 1A blacksmith's workshop; a smithy.

    • ‘Paddy is the last of the old time blacksmiths who worked in the local forges back in the 30's and 40's and in the late 50's.’
    • ‘The Bell, once the village pub, shut in 1988 and is now the The Bell House; alongside, only the name remains of what was the forge.’
    • ‘A DIY shop now stands on the site of the old forge.’
    • ‘Jim Sweeney told a few stories and recalled his early days as a merchant in Clonaslee when there were more shops plus three forges and a visiting dentist.’
    • ‘He feels he gets his musical talents from his late grandfather, Tom Dalton, who played the fiddle and who once owned a forge in Abbeyleix and from his mother Mary who also plays the accordion.’
    • ‘Mr Godbold's work has taken him all over Britain and he says the variety is what makes his job most interesting, although he now spends more than half his time in the office rather than the forge.’
    • ‘The rare forge in the village that is much commented upon by visitors needed repairing and the surviving village pump in its alcove still charms observers.’
    • ‘The owners of the former blacksmith's forge have turned it into a very comfortable small hotel, where the decor makes the most of the beams, brick and stone of the old building.’
    • ‘All at once there was a terrible crash and the bricks of the blacksmith's forge fell away.’
    • ‘Sometimes, when someone mentions a blacksmith's forge, I find myself instantaneously back in my childhood, visiting a local smithy.’
    • ‘At the forge, the blacksmith was putting out his fires and calling his two dogs, who trembled as they felt, with that sixth sense that humans have not, the threat of the oncoming storm.’
    • ‘But when we walk past the blacksmith's forge, a large man stops us.’
    • ‘And then he'd gone and blown the blacksmith's forge up.’
    • ‘Inquiring for the blacksmith, they found him in the forge not far from the house.’
    • ‘A small boy operating the bellows in the blacksmith's forge cost the rider an extra time delay in addition to the hours he had lost making the repair.’
    • ‘The forge was occupied by blacksmith Richard Tarrant when it was painted.’
    • ‘Culm was the material most widely used in the forges by blacksmiths and large quantities of the sub-stance were imported from England and Wales for that purpose.’
    • ‘Joe Dunne's dad had a forge there at Pat Miller's yard.’
    • ‘Eusebio pointed with pride to its church and rectory, carpenter shop, blacksmith forge, and water mill.’
    • ‘At one stage it was a place of great industry, with a mill at Ballypierce, a forge near the Ball-ally, a corn store, sand-pits and a wool store.’
    1. 1.1A furnace or hearth for melting or refining metal.
      • ‘The miners and refiners have steel and ore, the blacksmiths have forges and anvils.’
      • ‘Visitors can also see the traditional working blacksmith's forge.’
      • ‘Someone had obviously burnt the letters into the wall with something from the blacksmith's forge.’
      • ‘Stacks of old pipes were waiting to be carted back to the forges and melted down; bits of plating littered the workbenches; I recognised what had once been hoops securing the old boiler hanging from the walls.’
      • ‘Then he bought a small forge and began to produce dozens of candlesticks and figurines in his garden shed by the ‘lost wax’ method used by medieval artisans.’
      • ‘But to build it you need new forges, new metals and tools and the time to learn to use them properly.’
      • ‘The forger then seized the blank in a pair of tongs and reheated it in his forge or furnace to as high a temperature as the metal could stand without burning up.’
      • ‘Butter making, crochet, patchwork quilts, the traditional spinning wheel and a mobile forge are but a few of the items and sideshows that will feature at the rally.’
      • ‘Through a window, visitors can look down from the newly renovated gallery, with its white walls and Persian carpet, into the glowing forge of the sooty blacksmith shop.’
      • ‘Coal was initially used to supply domestic heat and fuel; to heat pans of sea-water to produce salt, of fats to make tallow for soap and candles, or of molasses to refine sugar; and in forges to heat iron and other metals.’
      • ‘He showed how to fire up the forge in the smithy and produce coke from the soft coal.’
      • ‘He made his mirrors from speculum metal - four parts copper to one part tin - but had to construct a forge to melt the speculum and cast the disc from which the mirror could be ground.’
      • ‘But till this very day, the forge and anvil are used by blacksmiths to mold and carve the general shape and desired balance of a weathervane.’
      • ‘So we have a picture of the mighty muscled blacksmith at his fiery forge - and give Mars rulership of the metal whose birth came from bloodshed and war.’
      • ‘The boffins also came to the conclusion that the armour was made in a low temperature bush fire and not in a blacksmith's forge as originally thought.’
      • ‘The boy directed Bill to his father who was slaving away at the smithy's forge.’
      • ‘Animated figures of women washed clothes, babies bawled, roosters crowed, blacksmiths worked at their forges.’
      • ‘Wrought iron was worked in a forge by the blacksmith.’
      • ‘Using long-handled tongs, he holds the metal in the forge until it heats to a dull red or straw color, then quickly moves it to the anvil.’
      • ‘We could not produce blue-prints or mould metal pokers in the forge.’
    2. 1.2A workshop or factory containing a furnace for refining metal.
      • ‘In cities, foundries and forges were large commercial affairs often employing up to forty or fifty men.’
      • ‘Gifford also had an interest in the family water-powered iron forge and hoe factory on the opposite side of the street from these mills.’
      • ‘In the 18th century, Derbyshire valleys echoed with the sound of the iron forges lining the banks of fast-flowing rivers.’
      • ‘Primarily an agrarian community the town was also home to a brass foundry, an iron forge, a wire-drawing mill, and a community of cabinetmakers.’
      • ‘The new building was on the site of an old forge.’
      • ‘Paper factories, glass factories, tanneries, forges, and other such establishments, which sold principally to local and national markets, had a far from negligible output.’
      • ‘Their shops ware on Main Street and on the Milldam, along with a brass foundry, an iron forge with a trip-hammer and wiredrawing mill and several cabinetmakers.’
      • ‘The actual melting point of steels is nearly twice as hot, at temperatures difficult to reach outside the specialized conditions of a foundry or forge.’
      • ‘In the iron industry, hard manual labour was still crucial for charging furnaces or dragging ingots around the forge.’
      • ‘We have a large building complex on the old Donnelleys site, several flats built on the site of the old forge and more on the Ainsty bakery site.’
      • ‘He further succeeded in re-opening the old forge for this production.’
      • ‘Their society worshipped metal, and some of the best gear in existence came from the Ele system's massive forges and factories.’

Origin

Middle English (also in the general sense make, construct): from Old French forger, from Latin fabricare fabricate from fabrica manufactured object, workshop The noun is via Old French from Latin fabrica.

Pronunciation:

forge

/fôrj/

Main definitions of forge in English

: forge1forge2

forge2

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • Move forward gradually or steadily.

    ‘he forged through the crowded side streets’
    • ‘That night camp was made on soft wet moss at the foot of the last escarpment before the Kongakut forges out onto the plain.’
    • ‘There is no literature about women of a certain age forging out on their own, and television is the place you do it, because it goes directly into the bloodstream of America, sublingual, injected.’
    • ‘He forges through the reeds and nips at the bull's heels.’
    • ‘The ship was forging forward, but at the table I felt myself pulled back to her smell and her skin and her sound; the ship sailed one way; I sailed another.’
    • ‘Nonetheless, I forged steadily forwards and was pleased to see the white and greenish-grey layers of ancient sandstone and shale getting closer.’
    • ‘You have to forge along, carefully treading a new way, trusting that your sense of direction has you going toward the right destination.’
    • ‘‘It's all right,’ repeats Snowy, as he forges across the lagoon toward me to effect the umpteenth rescue of the day.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, we must forge on, following the path along this more luxuriant, sheltered coast, through ferns and sweet-smelling woods.’
    advance steadily, advance gradually, press on, push on, soldier on, march on, push forward, move forward, move along, proceed, progress, make headway, make progress
    View synonyms

Phrasal Verbs

  • forge ahead

    • 1Move forward or take the lead in a race.

      • ‘Beckingsale attacked on the strength sapping drag on lap 5 and only Stander could match him and together they forged ahead of the chasing trio.’
      1. 1.1Continue or make progress with a course or undertaking.
        ‘the government is forging ahead with reforms’
        • ‘Even as such urgent measures are undertaken we must continue to forge ahead with the processes of economic and political reform.’
        • ‘Unlike rivals, it's forging ahead with big investment plans’
        • ‘Please discuss the pros and cons of the business that one must consider before forging ahead with an art gallery business plan.’
        • ‘Professors, recognizing their students' needs, either forged new and relevant material into their courses or steadfastly forged ahead with their planned syllabus.’
        • ‘While the economy may be to blame for a slowing in the number of new clubs, it hasn't stopped all club owners from forging ahead with expansion.’
        • ‘Despite the ugly scenes from Genoa, governments are forging ahead with their planned round of upcoming meetings beginning with Washington.’
        • ‘San Francisco also has a number of museums showing historic art that, despite the economic downturn, are forging ahead with new building projects designed by high-profile architects.’
        • ‘Consumer spending on durable goods continued to forge ahead during the 2001 recession at an annual rate of 4.3%.’
        • ‘As Golf Course News forges ahead, we realize that the only constant in the golf course industry is change.’
        • ‘Of course, the specifics of the loophole are so nebulous that the ending is doomed not to make any sense, but that doesn't stop the filmmakers from forging ahead with their agenda.’
        • ‘U.S. historians might find a brighter future in having a surer sense of self, being unapologetically who they are, and forging ahead with the recruitment and training of successors while there is still time.’
        • ‘All are forging ahead with alternative fuel technologies.’
        • ‘The international media is littered with articles stating that the U.S. economy is forging ahead with rapidly rising profits.’
        • ‘Fortunately for those of us who care there are some musicians out there who continue to forge ahead, out of the spotlight.’
        • ‘But local leaders are forging ahead with the stadium plan, no matter how many holes it has in it, with or without public support.’
        • ‘Taking life and the passage of time into full consideration, SP is forging ahead with his passion for hip hop that leaves you with something to think about.’
        • ‘These artists are bravely forging ahead with new approaches while not allowing others to completely define their art.’
        • ‘Even as California faces a shortfall approaching $30 billion, it's forging ahead with a plan to build a new maximum-security prison in Delano.’
        • ‘The firm is also forging ahead with innovative retail design ideas lot its many mixed-use projects.’
        • ‘She is notable mostly for forging ahead with a music career while struggling with multiple sclerosis.’

Origin

Mid 18th century (originally of a ship): perhaps an aberrant pronunciation of force.

Pronunciation:

forge

/fôrj/