Definition of footsore in US English:

footsore

adjective

  • (of a person or animal) having painful or tender feet from much walking.

    • ‘Even if you bypass the city's spectacular cathedral and a clutch of museums, including the splendid new Esbaluard contemporary art gallery, overlooking the bay, there is plenty to leave you footsore.’
    • ‘Weary and footsore, they trundled slowly out of the forest, the horses stumbling slightly despite the bright sunlight filtering in overhead.’
    • ‘You might be a bit footsore after wandering round all those shops, but a few minutes looking over a menu, Kir Royale in hand, and all will be right with the world.’
    • ‘The footsore pilgrim of old, the wayfarer half frozen from the storm, the tongue-tied lover dropping nervously by, might or might not be glad to hear it.’
    • ‘My quick hill bash became a long expedition and I finished tired and footsore in the dark.’
    • ‘Three Swindon police officers are preparing to get footsore in memory of a larger than life colleague.’
    • ‘He disappeared into the crowd of tired and footsore people, who were piling to the doors to catch their carriages.’
    • ‘At 5pm, cold and footsore, but driven forward by the noise and sheer scale of the movement, the North Pembrokeshire group reached the park.’
    • ‘Members of the Just For Fun line dancing group will be left footsore and weary after performing for 12 hours non-stop next month.’
    • ‘I was footsore and weary, possessed with only enough mad energy for this last fatal dash.’
    • ‘Weary and footsore they departed back to Perth with a trophy, a State title and one further decision that no less than the Australian Championships were going to be next.’
    • ‘Arron, under better circumstances, would have hesitated at the thought of yelling furiously at an attractive young stranger, but he was footsore, tired, and very, very confused.’
    • ‘I was very footsore and could only go at a snail's pace.’
    • ‘Tired, footsore and half-drenched, we had two things on our minds; a hot meal and an open fire.’
    • ‘But if you're footsore, you can hop on a First York local bus and buy an off-peak day pass for under £2.’
    • ‘Then my disciples pour from the trees, ragged and footsore.’
    • ‘I shall be back, footsore and happy on Monday.’
    • ‘And if you're a little footsore after all these hearty activities, many hotels offer spa and massage treatments.’
    • ‘By nightfall he was fatigued, footsore, famished.’
    • ‘They were sitting on the steps or resting on the balconies of the teahouses, staring at the tired, footsore pilgrims as they trudged past.’

Pronunciation

footsore

/ˈfo͝otsôr//ˈfʊtsɔr/