Definition of folderol in English:

folderol

(also falderal)

noun

  • 1Trivial or nonsensical fuss.

    ‘all the folderol of the athletic contests and the cheerleaders’
    • ‘Shows allowed the natural course of events to dictate their decisions, not some focus group falderal.’
    • ‘Oh, by the way, Hill was censured by the Senate this week in a bit of parliamentary falderal.’
    • ‘No amount of folderol, flummery or flattery makes it easier to swallow.’
    • ‘He had limits to how much folderol he could stand.’
    • ‘The folderol that followed was rather dismal, with angry conservative politicians threatening to reform the judiciary.’
    • ‘Stripped of arcane folderol, that's what the Electoral College amounts to.’
    • ‘And frankly, all the foolish falderal from the Me Decade has long since dissolved into a conglomeration of good will.’
    • ‘The upcoming gala Golden Week respite from the daily folderol will put our publishing schedule into a cocked hat yet once again.’
    • ‘Don't you be going on about all that metric folderol.’
    • ‘This stupid movie would have buried itself even without her fictional falderal influence.’
    • ‘That kind of folderol is enough to make any reasonable person cringe.’
    • ‘Naturally, it's the really annoying kids who understand all the scientific falderal that saves the day.’
    • ‘Instead, the filmmakers contented themselves with piling on more of the same tired war movie folderol.’
    • ‘Anatolians also carry out their tasks with no need for folderol.’
    • ‘The cocktails parties were long sessions during which we talked about birds, especially terns, mixed with much folderol.’
    disturbance, racket, uproar, tumult, ruckus, clamour, brouhaha, furore, hue and cry, palaver, fuss, stir, to-do, storm, maelstrom, melee
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    1. 1.1dated A showy but useless item.
      ornament, novelty, gewgaw, piece of bric-a-brac, bibelot, trinket, trifle, bauble, gimcrack, bagatelle, curio, curiosity, plaything, toy
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Origin

Early 18th century first used as a meaningless refrain in popular songs.

Pronunciation