Definition of foal in English:

foal

noun

  • A young horse or related animal.

    • ‘The red brick school, the church wall, 21 Clydesdale horses and four foals watch impassively as progress rushes past.’
    • ‘She raised this horse from a foal and she loved him to pieces.’
    • ‘Make sure that foals are handled often and that young horses get plenty of fresh air and time out to play.’
    • ‘Most prepared diets for foals and young growing horses are extremely high in sugar.’
    • ‘I really hate it when there are tourists and they go up and stroke the horses, particularly the foals.’
    • ‘I might have one of his foals for my own horse, but that was a ways away.’
    • ‘She wheeled around quickly and saw a young boy, maybe 11, holding onto the reigns of a young foal.’
    • ‘In summary, it appears that stomach ulcers are a common finding in foals and working horses.’
    • ‘Less than half of the foals born survive through the first year.’
    • ‘Similar to a paternity suit, the owners must prove they do not know which horse sired the foal.’
    • ‘Then one day, he noticed that a mare, a stallion and a foal had crossed the fence into the park.’
    • ‘Most predation probably occurs on foals and elderly animals.’
    • ‘He brought the pure white horses and their golden foals.’
    • ‘After a normal gestation period, the cloned foals are born.’
    • ‘The entire tribe, excepting young foals and their mothers, was out, fighting.’
    • ‘Andrew has a dog called Chloe and two horses and a foal.’
    • ‘She knew every one of them, from the youngest foal to Fenris' fearsome warhorse.’
    • ‘Whether you plan on keeping or selling the foal, breed for a horse with an agreeable character.’
    • ‘After producing a foal, her periods of estrus are more difficult to detect, and she remains with the father of her offspring.’
    • ‘The mares (up to five or six) of the stallion's subsequent conquests and their foals will fall into line accordingly.’
    young donkey, young horse, young mule, young pony
    View synonyms

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1(of a mare) give birth to a foal.

    • ‘Eating infected fescue often causes extended pregnancies in mares, resulting in foaling problems.’
    • ‘Peasant is out of the unraced Cipayo mare Nashira, who died in 2001 from laminitis after foaling a filly by Acceptable.’
    • ‘Middlesex Drive will stand for $2,500, with special consideration to mares foaling in Pennsylvania.’
    • ‘He said that Tres Fine will ship north to foal in Kentucky.’
    • ‘Three to six weeks before foaling, the mare's udder usually begins to develop.’
    • ‘The mare must foal in British Columbia and be bred back to a stallion standing in the province.’
    • ‘Bonny just had one foal, but Dennis's Uncle Tom, who farmed at Barton, near Preston, had a mare that foaled around the same time.’
    • ‘Therefore, close observation is necessary to ensure that appropriate nursing occurs in the first hours after foaling.’
    • ‘Within 6 months of foaling the weaning process begins.’
    • ‘Inbreeding may account for the fact that far fewer than half of all breeding mares foal each year.’
    • ‘That didn't surprise Ben in the least since also in the barn was one of their prized mares, ready to foal at any time.’
    • ‘About four years ago, Susan was called out of town on business when three mares were due to foal.’
    • ‘After the neighbor's mare foaled amid a flood of amniotic fluid, the estrogen left her urine and Timothy's flame trees died.’
    • ‘A 30-mL sample of colostrum and a 6-mL sample of the foal's blood were collected immediately after foaling.’
    • ‘She was sent to England, where she foaled the Kingmambo filly, to be bred to the ill-fated Dubai Millennium.’
    • ‘As I already told you, two days after my mare foaled I did.’
    • ‘His stud fee has been set at $2,500, with a $500 discount to mares foaling in the state.’
    • ‘Detroit, the 1980 French Horse of the Year, died on May 20 at Swettenham Stud in England following complications while foaling.’
    • ‘The best measures you can take include making sure the mare has good quality alfalfa or grass hay available, as well as a suitable location for foaling.’
    • ‘In March, Ingot Way died at Summer Wind Farm near Georgetown, Kentucky, at the age of 21 after foaling a colt by Awesome Again.’
    1. 1.1be foaled (of a foal) be born.
      • ‘The overall statistics include 157 progeny covered by North American stallions that were foaled outside the continent.’
      • ‘Her last foal was the Storm Cat filly Dreamlike, who was foaled in 1997 but is unraced.’
      • ‘The overall statistics include 185 progeny sired by North American stallions that were foaled abroad.’
      • ‘Young Kenny was foaled at his trainer Peter Beaumont's Foulrice Farm near Brandsby, north of York.’
      • ‘A full brother to the deceased colt was foaled on April 20; Dance Smartly is currently in foal to Thunder Gulch.’

Phrases

  • in (or with) foal

    • (of a mare) pregnant.

      • ‘He is waiting to see if one of his precious mares is in foal.’
      • ‘Norwegian Wood, an unraced mare believed to be in foal to Millennium Wind, is a half sister to 1994 Horse of the Year and multiple Grade 1 winner Holy Bull.’
      • ‘Mermaid's Tale, an unraced six-year-old mare believed to be in foal to Unbridled's Song, brought the third-highest price of the session.’
      • ‘Three mares listed in foal to Danjur, who set a track record for five furlongs in winning the 1996 Churchill Downs Turf Sprint Stakes, are in the catalog.’
      • ‘She stopped at the stall of a bay mare heavy with foal.’
      • ‘Jennymeg, a seven-year-old mare in foal to Two Punch, brought a session-topping price of $50,000 from Hector Alcalde.’
      • ‘There are mares in foal in nearby fields on top of the fact that it is lambing season.’
      • ‘The young attractive mares in foal to good stallions always sell well, but beyond that I'm not sure what to expect.’
      • ‘Also included in the catalog are mares in foal to young stallions Sakhee, Golan, Daylami, and Noverre.’
      • ‘Other mares will be sold in foal to Alphabet Soup, El Prado, Golden Missile, Lit de Justice, Running Stag, and Wild Rush.’

Origin

Old English fola, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch veulen and German Fohlen, also to filly.

Pronunciation

foal

/fōl//foʊl/