Main definitions of flounce in English

: flounce1flounce2

flounce1

verb

  • 1no object , with adverbial of direction Go or move in an exaggeratedly impatient or angry manner.

    ‘he stood up in a fury and flounced out’
    • ‘After an exchange of pleasantries the ambassador told Derry who our man was and which paper he represented, upon which Lord Wallpaper turned abruptly and flounced off.’
    • ‘Ash looks at me, a hint of concern on his face while I choke on cookie and watch Elly stand up and flounce dramatically from the room.’
    • ‘I didn't know what last time was, but it had to have been bad because Kara's face colored and she seemed at a loss for words, picking to flounce off in a fury instead.’
    • ‘As the others flounced and stamped their way through the jungle, Blackburn's equable temper won through.’
    • ‘Mr Posh was so miffed he flounced into training, lanky hair pushed back by an Alice band to show off his scar to the world, wearing the sort of sulk most three-year-olds would consider melodramatic.’
    • ‘Making an angry noise, she turned and flounced out to the carriage.’
    • ‘She flounces off and leaves them all looking awkward.’
    • ‘Tia watched the younger twin flounce out of the room as the older one came in.’
    • ‘With a sarcastic ‘thanks’, she flounces off the bus.’
    • ‘‘Don't be a pillock,’ snapped Nicol and flounced off.’
    • ‘Any self-respecting 17-year-old vegetarian would have flounced away in disgust, but instead my response marked the first flicker that my veggie years may be short-lived.’
    • ‘As the mischievous Adele, Sarah Asmar stomped or flounced around the stage, tossing off her numerous high notes as though they were nothing.’
    • ‘Matilda rebuffs this suggestion before flouncing off in a huff, leaving Henry certain that he's hit the nail on the head!’
    • ‘She flounces home and stands outside of Lyn's house crying.’
    • ‘Adrian nodded and watched her friend swiftly flounce out of the room.’
    • ‘She flounced a few inches away, then began tearing strips off the sheet.’
    • ‘The Rovers Return, being a soap opera pub, has seen its fair share of fisticuffs and flouncing out.’
    • ‘And there is no use flouncing off to the rival Pontin's - it has found a new lease of life hosting indie festivals, such as All Tomorrow's Parties.’
    • ‘She gets a pouty face on and flounces over to Jacobs.’
    • ‘Friesinger, who had earlier flounced out of the German training camp and moved into a hotel because of the intensity of the media pressure, consoled herself with a gold in the 1,500m, her favourite distance.’
    storm, stride angrily, sweep, stomp, stamp, march, strut, stalk
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Move with exaggerated motions.
      ‘she flounced around, playing the tart and flirting’
      • ‘In between all the whining and flouncing around, she manages to fit in some of the worst acting I've seen in a long time - check out the heartfelt, climactic speech at the end of the film.’
      • ‘As he flounces out of the office to greet me, he is surrounded by an entourage of men, any one of whom could be the one with £350m in the bank.’
      • ‘‘I've got to have a fag,’ she replies, flouncing out.’
      • ‘That was all work, apart from occasionally flouncing into the kitchen and making myself some coffee.’
      • ‘Jessica flounces up, gathering up all the popular people.’
      • ‘She flounced her way over to him and smiled a petit little winning smile.’
      • ‘He flounces round the kitchen, sings at the top of his voice, flirts with his contestants and his food - and drools over it.’
      • ‘We were absolutely over-the-top saccharine sarcastic sweet to Tom and the Weasel, and then flounced off to a booth that the hot bouncer was holding for us.’
      • ‘She flounced her way back to the head of the group, joining with Polina in a conversation of some sort.’
      • ‘Back at the Highcliff, the bars were awash with pretty young things - lobbyists and special advisers, mostly - flouncing around in pastel shades and heavy eye make-up.’
      • ‘All of a sudden, a whiff of vanilla rolls in the door, and in flounces Gemma, in a green-and-black plaid skirt and a green Flogging Molly tee.’
      • ‘I took off at great speed, swooshing and swirling my way down hill (creative jargon for flailing and flouncing about), only to hear great yelps approaching from the rear.’
      • ‘‘Great,’ says Janae with a sultry smile, and flounces back inside.’
      • ‘Like an old trouper who cannot resist the limelight, Lewis flounced out of a special parade of champions, saying he could not support sport as long as there were drug cover-ups going on.’
      • ‘She flounces regally off the train, affording glimpses of a waist bulging from a too-tight waistband.’
      • ‘I get freezing cold, sit beside the fire then flounce up to my room.’
      • ‘The bell rings and she grabs her bag and flounces out, disregarding Miss.’
      • ‘The ever-charming Lorraine Jarrod flounced into my office in her best accusatory manner and informed me that Alex was in jail.’
      • ‘They watched her flounce back into the Ballroom, her dress's skirt swishing around her hips.’

noun

  • An exaggerated action, typically intended to express one's annoyance or impatience.

    ‘she left the room with a flounce’
    • ‘Seryna's distaste, while initially borne from Visbec's flounce and flirtatious mannerisms, had grown with an infatuation for Naoise.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: perhaps of Scandinavian origin and related to Norwegian flunsa ‘hurry’, or perhaps symbolic, like bounce or pounce.

Pronunciation

flounce

/flouns//flaʊns/

Main definitions of flounce in English

: flounce1flounce2

flounce2

noun

  • A wide ornamental strip of material gathered and sewn to a piece of fabric, typically on a skirt or dress; a frill.

    • ‘Using seams, pleating and sculpting, Gaultier sent out silhouettes that traced the outline of the body then ended in dramatic flounces, drapes or pleats.’
    • ‘The silhouette here is hourglass, with strong shoulders and hems flaring in sculptural flounces.’
    • ‘Performances of femininity are all about adding on - breasts, makeup, sparkly boas, frills, and flounces.’
    • ‘Playfully tugging on her brown ponytail, he called for a strapless, mint green gown, a long tulle with many flounces of lace and sheer fabric.’
    • ‘There's an excess of flounces and frou-frou as swirling skirts, bangles, baubles, ribbons and bow trims come out to play.’
    • ‘They built a corset for me and added crinoline and flounces, and no one was the wiser - until the footbridge scene, the only love scene in the film.’
    • ‘Ruffle necklines are big too, as well as fluted sleeves, hem flounces and ruched side panels.’
    • ‘It was a deep blue - rich and velvety, with several flounces and cream lace cuffs.’
    • ‘The theme of ‘charming and hippie’ is highlighted in floral designs and flounces which go together with boots and wide waistbelts.’
    • ‘Dancing lessons and ballet get gently ragged, as with a teacher dressed entirely in pink flounces.’
    • ‘It was fairly simple: having no frills or flounces, yet it was that simplicity that made the dress so appealing.’
    • ‘Compared to the sophisticated aubergine walls and sparkling amethyst chandeliers of the dining room, the bedrooms have much more of a country-house feel, with lots of flounces and frills.’
    • ‘Collars and cuffs are an antidote to those frills and flounces.’
    • ‘The door swung open to reveal an auburn-haired teenager, wearing an embroidered, crimson gown, with dozens of flounces, a flattering waist and neck-line with matching scowl.’
    • ‘While Tisci focused on black and oyster, Lacroix used a vast array of colors and along with the rich details of beads, laces, corsets, flounces and satin.’
    • ‘She did look a bit odd; she wore a slightly torn red dress, with puffy sleeves and flounces starting at her hips and reaching down to the floor.’
    • ‘However, when fashion decreed crinolines, bustles, and fussy late-Victorian frills and flounces, Australia tried to follow.’
    • ‘Miss Howitt's dress was in the height of fashion; blue silk spencer over a white round dress with several flounces at the hem, complemented by a yellow paisley shawl draped over her shoulders.’
    • ‘Add drama with flounces, lace and fringe in steamy matador looks.’
    • ‘Puffed sleeves and flounces convey a playful, romantic look.’
    frill, ruffle, ruff, peplum, jabot, furbelow, ruche, ruching, gather, tuck, fringe
    View synonyms

verb

as adjective flounced
  • Trimmed with a flounce or flounces.

    ‘a flounced skirt’
    • ‘She tucked the shirt into the frilly underskirt, worn under the wine colored flounced gypsy skirt.’
    • ‘Featuring four increasing layers of illusion netting and a flounced chapel length train, this gown is beautified by an all over floral embroidered and beaded pattern.’
    • ‘Try dressing your room with wicker baskets, and look for flounced or ruffled curtains, tablecloths and bedding.’
    • ‘Women's attire consists of solid-colored or polka-dot dresses with tightly fitted bodices and flounced skirts and sleeves.’
    • ‘The Zebra's stripes are revealed by pulling strips from a white flounced dress.’

Origin

Early 18th century: from an alteration of obsolete frounce ‘a fold or pleat’, from Old French fronce, of Germanic origin; related to ruck.

Pronunciation

flounce

/flouns//flaʊns/