Main definitions of fleet in English

: fleet1fleet2fleet3fleet4

fleet1

noun

  • 1A group of ships sailing together, engaged in the same activity, or under the same ownership.

    ‘the small port supports a fishing fleet’
    • ‘Where it once had a fleet of 15 ships, it now has three, with another ship being reactivated later this year.’
    • ‘In 1588 the world's most powerful empire launched a fleet of ships against a small maritime nation.’
    • ‘Moore talks of spearheading ‘the new cavalry’, which means a fleet of helicopter gun ships.’
    • ‘It seems that in 1678 the French planned to attack the Dutch with a fleet of 20 ships.’
    • ‘This time, he captained a fleet of four ships and was charged with finding a westward sea passage to East Asia.’
    • ‘Among the ships are a fleet of wooden steamships, built to serve in World War I but then abandoned and brought here to be salvaged.’
    • ‘The name comes from a hurricane that struck the area in 1715, wrecking a fleet of Spanish treasure ships en route from Havana to Spain.’
    • ‘The Big Ship, Reynard, was the largest in the fleet of appropriated sailing ships that Claw's organization was running.’
    • ‘In 1210, he invaded Ireland with a fleet of 700 ships carrying his feudal host and a force of Flemish mercenaries.’
    • ‘A fleet of thirteen ships and over 36,000 troops set forth for Alexandria, at the mouth of the Nile, in June 1798, conquering Malta on the way.’
    • ‘Holland America Cruise has a fleet of 12 luxury ships sailing to all the continents across more than 280 ports.’
    • ‘At the same time, they sent a fleet of 100 ships to the Peloponnese.’
    • ‘From evidence found at the site, a fleet of 120 Viking ships occupied the Woodstown site about 812.’
    • ‘We will sail in a fleet of five ships; the Conquest, Avenger, Illusion, Sea Queen, and Voyager.’
    • ‘The bad weather has hampered the work of a fleet of clean-up ships which have been sent by countries from around Europe.’
    • ‘Through viticultural enterprise, the monastery became extremely powerful, owning a fleet of ships which sailed the Rhine.’
    • ‘Although he also created advertisements and logos and executed historical murals for public schools and a fleet of cruise ships, he did little easel painting.’
    • ‘He met what he supposed was a fleet of Norse trading ships and directed the sailors to the nearby royal estate.’
    • ‘Again the screen flickered, changing the view to a fleet of magnificent shimmering ships.’
    • ‘In July 1497 Vasco da Gama left Lisbon with 170 men in a fleet of four heavy ships, each carrying 20 guns and a variety of trade goods.’
    1. 1.1A country's navy.
      ‘the US fleet’
      • ‘The comte de Rochambeau had already begun planning for a siege at Yorktown when he requested assistance from the commander of the French fleet in the Caribbean.’
    2. 1.2A number of vehicles or aircraft operating together or under the same ownership.
      ‘a fleet of ambulances took the injured to hospital’
      • ‘A fleet of vintage vehicles form the centre of attraction.’
      • ‘The US operates a fleet of more than 15,000 aircraft, including 20 stealth bombers in service.’
      • ‘This county's brigade currently relies on a fleet of 24 vehicles, many of which are more than 20 years old.’
      • ‘It's not a very big airline (a fleet of 56 aircraft) yet it manages fatal crash after fatal crash.’
      • ‘We operate a fleet of six aircraft; one of which is used as a dedicated stand-by aircraft.’
      • ‘A fleet of 87 buses operated there when it closed in January, 1986.’
      • ‘A fleet of vehicles would be at the disposal of every booking office for instant pickup and delivery, he added.’
      • ‘How would you operate a fleet of large, sophisticated aircraft?’
      • ‘It operates a fleet of 13 Boeing 737-300s, and employs around 650 people.’
      • ‘The sirens have been fitted to 18 ambulances and 10 other emergency vehicles out of a fleet of 50 vehicles.’
      • ‘A fleet of 150 vehicles will be set up in West Yorkshire with about eight of them expected to be allocated to Bradford within 12 months.’
      • ‘Kent ambulance service has denied it is running a fleet of dirty vehicles after a report criticised cleaning procedures.’
      • ‘Indeed a number of councils have considered operating their own vehicle fleets in order to undermine the market strength of the powerful bus groups.’
      • ‘It has a fleet of 28 aircraft and transports 6.6 million passengers a year.’
      • ‘At lunchtime on August 15, radar operators near Scarborough picked up signals from a fleet of German aircraft heading over the North Sea.’
      • ‘The company is now conducting a review of all its operations which include 33 tour operators, 3,600 travel agents and a fleet of 83 aircraft.’
      • ‘It operates a modern fleet of 21 aircraft, linking destinations in north and central Italy with airports in Germany and other European countries.’
      • ‘It consists of 5,000 trained volunteer men and women and maintains a fleet of over 130 vehicles and ambulances.’
      • ‘Today it is regarded as one of the best equipped, most efficient and most economical in the country with a fleet of 24 vehicles.’
      • ‘The airline now operates with a fleet of 367 aircraft, 6 fewer than last year.’

Origin

Old English flēot ship, shipping from flēotan float, swim (see fleet).

Pronunciation:

fleet

/flēt/

Main definitions of fleet in English

: fleet1fleet2fleet3fleet4

fleet2

adjective

  • Fast and nimble in movement.

    ‘a man of advancing years, but fleet of foot’

Origin

Early 16th century: probably from Old Norse fljótr, of Germanic origin and related to fleet.

Pronunciation:

fleet

/flēt/

Main definitions of fleet in English

: fleet1fleet2fleet3fleet4

fleet3

noun

British
  • A marshland creek, channel, or ditch.

    • ‘The ditches, dikes and reed-edged fleets that crisscross the grazing marshes here are rich in invertebrates, including the scarce emerald damselfly.’
    • ‘Sam explained that the 3,000 acres of the Nature Reserve is the largest in the English lowlands, the main area being grazing marsh divided by a network of ditches and fleets.’

Origin

Old English flēot, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch vliet, also to fleet.

Pronunciation:

fleet

/flēt/

Main definitions of fleet in English

: fleet1fleet2fleet3fleet4

fleet4

verb

[NO OBJECT]literary
  • 1 Move or pass quickly.

    ‘a variety of expressions fleeted across his face’
    ‘time may fleet and youth may fade’
    1. 1.1[with object]Pass (time) rapidly.
    2. 1.2Fade away; be transitory.
      ‘the cares of boyhood fleet away’

Origin

Old English flēotan float, swim of Germanic origin; related to Dutch vlieten and German fliessen, also to flit and float.

Pronunciation:

fleet

/flēt/