Definition of Flavian in English:

Flavian

adjective

  • Relating to a dynasty (AD 69–96) of Roman emperors including Vespasian and his sons Titus and Domitian.

    • ‘Suetonius, writing about the Julio-Claudian and Flavian emperors under a new dynasty, saw no reason to treat them as heroes.’
    • ‘The art of the Flavian dynasty is characterized by divergent official styles and imagery.’
    • ‘Vespasian was the ultimate victor of the ‘Year of the Four Emperors', founding the Flavian dynasty.’
    • ‘Taking the name Flavius Josephus in honour of his patron, Josephus became, in effect, a court historian and propagandist for the new Flavian dynasty.’
    • ‘This described the games for the opening of the Flavian amphitheatre (the Colosseum): we possess an incomplete selection of about 30 poems from the original volume.’
    • ‘As no members of the Flavian house were left, the Senate now stepped in and chose one of its own as the new emperor: Nerva, who was already a very old man.’
    • ‘Portraits from the Flavian period use fewer warm colors.’
    • ‘His name indicates that his family was granted the citizenship by the Flavian dynasty of Vespasian.’
    • ‘The town fortified under Augustus expanded greatly in the Flavian period.’
    • ‘Excavations of the amphitheatre provide the possibility, but not the certainty, of a pre, or early Flavian date for that monument, as does the skewed relationship of the town baths to the street grid.’
    • ‘The settlement developed into a planned Roman town from early Flavian times.’
    • ‘In fact, the new Flavian dynasty which took control of Rome in AD 69 erected this vast pleasure palace for the people precisely in order to obliterate Nero's memory.’
    • ‘Just such a Flavian palace was discovered a century and a half later at Fishbourne.’
    • ‘However, the outcome of the wars brought in a vigorous new administration in the persons of the Flavian emperors.’
    • ‘He also established the Flavian dynasty as the legitimate successor to the throne.’

noun

  • A member of the Flavian dynasty.

    • ‘As the Flavians advanced on Rome there were steady desertions from Vitellius' cause, though his praetorians remained loyal.’
    • ‘The rule of the Flavians consisted of no more than the rule of Vespasian and his two sons, a span of twenty-six years.’
    • ‘To a certain extent this urbanization under the Flavians was less than completely successful.’
    • ‘Elsewhere there is very little to go on to assess the nature and character of urban development before the Flavians.’
    • ‘The latter managed to stick, founding a new dynasty, the Flavians.’
    • ‘Either way, the result was a new imperial dynasty: the Flavians.’

Origin

From Latin Flavianus, from Flavius, a given name used by this dynasty.

Pronunciation:

Flavian

/ˈflāvēən/