Definition of flaunt in English:

flaunt

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Display (something) ostentatiously, especially in order to provoke envy or admiration or to show defiance.

    ‘newly rich consumers eager to flaunt their prosperity’
    • ‘Yet what is clear from the very first page is that here is a writer of high intelligence (always much brighter than even her sharpest characters though she never flaunts it), who is exercising restraint.’
    • ‘In its sentiments Pouncey's novel flaunts psychotherapy as a fashionable accessory, the sharing of confidences (already grasped before they are spelt out) over the tinkle of fine teacups.’
    • ‘Even though every magazine and ad flaunts naked bodies, the film industry is oddly intimidated by bodies - in motion, or still.’
    • ‘It flaunts its power to bar people from flights.’
    • ‘Ruppert claims to represent neither right nor left and flaunts his background as a police detective to refute accusations that he gets a bit carried away in his conclusions.’
    • ‘Thus today one flaunts a G-string as if it were a Victoria Cross.’
    • ‘Photographer Colin Jones flaunts a life story that is a picture in itself.’
    • ‘It is not just about owning the painting and flaunting it but more about displaying it with style and the right interiors.’
    • ‘Government after government flaunts its green credentials while the countryside is becoming so poisoned that whole species of wildlife are vanishing.’
    • ‘To round off the festivities, there were models flaunting designer wears during the fashion parade.’
    • ‘In all the shoots, she flaunts designer wear, including jewellery and fabulous clothes.’
    • ‘They are big brash symbols of conspicuous consumption, a way for flash men and women with a lot of cash to flaunt their wealth.’
    • ‘She not only openly flaunts her unearned wealth, but also uses her assets to seize eyeballs from her less fortunate sisters.’
    • ‘We are eager to flaunt every new gadget we buy but are yet to learn the basic rules to be followed while using it.’
    • ‘Smart lads, they hadn't flaunted the loot, bragged about the heist, or written a rap song memorializing the event.’
    • ‘Sure, she had been born with a silver spoon in her mouth, but she didn't brag about it or flaunt her money.’
    • ‘It flaunts its disdain for democracy and gets away with it.’
    • ‘It's open late, it flaunts its exclusivity and it gets regular plugs in the gay press (so it's a club).’
    • ‘What most people seem to be missing, however, is that he's still not much more than a glorified landlord who crassly flaunts his wealth in front of the unwashed American underclasses.’
    • ‘He flaunts his riches like everyone in the business.’
    show off, display ostentatiously, draw attention to, make a show of, make a great show of, put on show, put on display, parade, exhibit
    flourish, brandish, wave, dangle
    exult in, brag about, crow about, vaunt
    flash
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Dress or behave in a sexually provocative way.
      • ‘Girls are always flaunting themselves at me and flirting.’
      • ‘From the opening scene through the end of the episode, she flaunts herself.’
      • ‘It wasn't right of me to say you were flaunting yourself.’
      • ‘They also had concerns that modelling their own fashions in the shop window may be frowned upon as them flaunting themselves.’
      • ‘British youths themselves force as much booze as possible down their throats, while flaunting themselves shamelessly in a bid to grab the most attention from the opposite sex.’
      • ‘And if they are flaunting themselves, it also speaks of their new-found confidence.’
      • ‘You don't dress provocatively, and you don't go around flaunting yourself.’
      • ‘I couldn't help but wonder why the other day all those females were flaunting themselves at him despite his attitude towards them.’
      • ‘Hookers stood on most corners, flaunting themselves to any who passed by.’
      • ‘It was funny, most girls he knew were out, flaunting themselves, baring every bit of flesh that they could get away with, without getting arrested.’

Usage

Flaunt and flout may sound similar but they have different meanings. Flaunt means ‘display ostentatiously,’ as in tourists who liked to flaunt their wealth, while flout means ‘openly disregard (a rule or convention),’ as in new recruits growing their hair and flouting convention. It is a common error, recorded since around the 1940s, to use flaunt when flout is intended, as in the young woman had been flaunting the rules and regulations

Phrases

  • if you've got it, flaunt it

    • informal One should make a conspicuous and confident show of one's wealth or attributes rather than be modest about them.

      • ‘By the 1990s, Girl Power - a term invented by the Spice Girls - had come to mean ‘If you've got it, flaunt it!’.’
      • ‘Hair - if you've got it, flaunt it! Big hair is in.’
      • ‘Rather than hiding refrigerators and dishwashers behind fitted panelling, many fashion-conscious consumers are now taking an ‘if you've got it, flaunt it’ approach with their kitchen appliances, making them a feature in themselves.’
      • ‘Never has the phrase ‘if you've got it, flaunt it’ seemed less appropriate.’
      • ‘Sure, there's a degree of pretension evident in those titles, but if you've got it, flaunt it.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

flaunt

/flänt//flônt/