Main definitions of fit in English

: fit1fit2fit3

fit1

adjective

  • 1predicative Of a suitable quality, standard, or type to meet the required purpose.

    ‘the meat is fit for human consumption’
    with infinitive ‘is the water clean and fit to drink?’
    • ‘Look at some of the buildings, run down and no longer fit for purpose.’
    • ‘The van was fit for the purpose for which it was purchased.’
    • ‘Nothing can enter these kitchens that isn't deemed fit for human consumption.’
    • ‘Regulations requiring that the houses be deemed fit for habitation have been waived so that they can move in.’
    • ‘But up to 150 council workers based at the Fashion Corner council tax office were waiting to find out whether the building was fit for work.’
    • ‘He says that the property is not fit for human habitation and is in serious disrepair.’
    • ‘He pronounced them fit for consumption, upon which we all fell to them hungrily.’
    • ‘Meat which is not fit for consumption in the EU is now heading for South Africa.’
    • ‘However as long as the ship had lifeboats on board it was fit to travel.’
    • ‘The Roadmen's cottages have been used for no more than rough storage for some years and would require considerable work before they were fit for habitation.’
    • ‘Perhaps the trauma of that August day, when he was forced to spend so many hours in an outfit not fit for any particular athletic activity was just too much for him.’
    • ‘Vic representatives visited the Southern Cross shortly after Easter and found the first and second floors fit for habitation.’
    • ‘But brains from younger animals will still be considered fit for human consumption.’
    • ‘First, the food and drink had to be certified fit for human consumption.’
    • ‘They spent at least another £7,000 making the launch watertight and fit for habitation.’
    • ‘The chancellor's upbeat pre-budget report hammered home the message that the economy will be fit to meet challenges from Asia and China.’
    • ‘Under the Sale of Goods Act retailers must sell goods that are of a satisfactory quality, are accurately described on the packaging and are fit for their purpose.’
    • ‘Mr. Saunders apparently thinks that the boat, as delivered, was fit for the purpose for which it was intended.’
    • ‘The Association executive have had talks with the club, who indicated that they will do their utmost to ensure the playing surface is fit for cricket to be played.’
    • ‘I contacted a wine merchant in London and told him I wanted to buy some that would be fit for drinking in ten years time.’
    suitable, good enough
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Having the requisite qualities or skills to undertake something competently.
      ‘he felt himself quite fit for battle’
      with infinitive ‘Ted was ghastly pale and fit to do no more than switch channels’
      • ‘He was quite useless here and the only thing he was fit for was to run things like Hampton Court entertainment… They will make rings round him.’
      • ‘Luckily, the doctor in charge kept on giving her a chit that she was fit and able to work although she was not.’
      • ‘That must go as far as not working excessive hours and being fit for the job they are doing at the time.’
      • ‘It's right to question, as the Royal Gazette does today, whether such gross negligence means the Government is fit to govern.’
      • ‘And after 10 weeks in hospital, numerous complications and surgery, he was fit enough to return home.’
      • ‘He got in his van and drove, was clearly not in a fit state, and accepted now he made the wrong decision.’
      • ‘Doctors will be regularly asked to demonstrate their competence, so that they are fit to practise throughout their lives.’
      • ‘Normally I do not drink at lunchtime because all I am fit for is a siesta; evening is a different matter < g >.’
      • ‘But does taking a certificate guarantee that someone will be fit for purpose?’
      • ‘If we can persuade a few more to stay on rather then retire if they are fit and able to do the job, then that is a good thing.’
      • ‘A Member who no longer thinks his party is fit to govern should in conscience resign from that party, and the party should be able to expel him if he doesn't.’
      • ‘In attempting to limit the damage by lying about his own words, he has merely raised the most serious question of all: whether or not he is fit for public office.’
      • ‘And those who would seek to give us that kind of politics are very happy to indulge the patronising fantasies of those who think it is all we are fit for.’
      • ‘Now, does Professor Collins believe that a professor at his university is fit for his job if the professor lies in his research?’
      • ‘William Hague hopes to use this week's Conservative conference to prove he is fit for government.’
      • ‘Even if he didn't betray his secret, he would never be deemed fit to return to work.’
      • ‘If he is deemed by the court to not be fit and proper to operate the pub then we would look at reopening with a new tenant.’
      • ‘New aspects require policies to ensure that rail personnel are fit for duty and, in particular, that they are not impaired by drugs or alcohol.’
      • ‘Neither of these men is stupid enough to believe that churches are fit to govern a secular society, unlike many of their junior colleagues.’
      • ‘Between now and the next general election we have to persuade millions of people up and down the country that this Conservative party is fit for government.’
      competent, able, capable
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Suitable and correct according to accepted social standards.
      ‘a fit subject on which to correspond’
      • ‘But religion is a private matter, and thus not a fit subject for an inaugural address.’
      • ‘Many former stars say it is not a fit subject for the soap.’
      • ‘It is not for the Speaker to judge whether it is fit and proper for a Minister to have access to official information.’
      • ‘While the results demonstrated an abundance of creativity in the audience, not all of the sculptures would be fit for public display!’
      • ‘How could any Court of Review determine whether leave ought to be given or not without hearing and determining upon the hearing whether it was a fit case for an appeal?’
      • ‘What objective criteria decide what is fit to print?’
      • ‘The concept of the early modern period also enabled an exploration of topics and subjects not previously thought fit for consideration in relation to the Renaissance.’
      suitable, good enough
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3informal with infinitive (of a person or thing) having reached such an extreme condition as to be on the point of doing the thing specified.
      ‘he baited even his close companions until they were fit to kill him’
      • ‘We were both fit to explode but managed to share a peanut butter and chocolate cheesecake.’
      • ‘The water hurt his nose and stung his lungs and he felt fit to burst.’
      • ‘Allen's eyeballs looked fit to pop out of his head on several occasions as he exhorted his players.’
      • ‘He is so excited about his aspiration that his bubble is fit to burst.’
      • ‘Rhyann looked fit to kill, but it was nothing compared to Gavin's anger when Alex had first fallen under.’
      ready, prepared, on the point of, set, all set, in a fit state, primed, disposed, likely, about
      View synonyms
    4. 1.4informal Ready.
      ‘well, are you fit?’
      • ‘Are you fit then to return to the lecture?’
      • ‘Now just put on these boots and you're fit to go!’
  • 2In good health, especially because of regular physical exercise.

    figurative ‘the measures would ensure a leaner, fitter company’
    ‘I swim regularly to keep fit’
    • ‘People who are physically fit are happier, healthier and more productive than those who are not.’
    • ‘The only way to get fit is to make exercise a regularly scheduled part of every week, even every day.’
    • ‘Dancing is great fun and a great way to keep fit during the winter months.’
    • ‘A healthy body is one that is strong, flexible and aerobically fit.’
    • ‘Being always on the move, they are a very fit and strong people.’
    • ‘Would you like to become fit without the pounding and perspiration of an aerobic class or a gym?’
    • ‘Football isn't just about committing yourself to training and being fit.’
    • ‘The 13-mile run may still be three months away but participants are being urged to get in training now to ensure they are fit for the event.’
    • ‘We think that we will get very fit by the years end.’
    • ‘The ecologically sound version of working out involves joining in with conservation work to get fit and help the environment at the same time.’
    • ‘He is prone to being overweight, to having a dodgy knee, to not being able to stay fit for a full season.’
    • ‘For me being physically fit is beneficial as it helps with my mental capacities when I'm driving.’
    • ‘He appreciates how fortunate he is to be fit and able to meet such a challenge.’
    • ‘Research has shown that most of us regularly over-estimate how fit we are and how much real physical activity we do.’
    • ‘A Rossendale councillor has taken on a mammoth training regime to get fit for the ultimate challenge - a trek to Everest Base Camp.’
    • ‘Being as fit and healthy as possible maximises the chances of a healthy pregnancy.’
    • ‘Whisper it, but some players on the circuit are even less fit than your average county cricketer.’
    • ‘You have to be fit to play competitively, and all younger players are competitive.’
    • ‘Volunteers will need to be fit and will be able to make their own way to Tatton Park.’
    • ‘But we can at least keep ourselves physically fit and healthy, capable of working tirelessly for ourselves and others.’
    healthy, well, in good health
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1British informal Sexually attractive; good-looking.
      • ‘Some really fit guy wearing a gorgeous top came wandering down the stairs.’
      • ‘Go and chat up her fit friend!’
      • ‘I have got a girlfriend from college but I have recently been introduced to a really fit girl through a friend of mine.’
      • ‘Who is that guy? Oh he's so fit!’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Be of the right shape and size for.

    ‘those jeans still fit me’
    no object ‘the shoes fit better after being stretched’
    • ‘Another approach is to take a shirt that fits you perfectly and determine the distance between the middle of its collar button to the far end of the buttonhole.’
    • ‘She looks sleek in a beige, almost flesh-tone, summer dress and a slightly darker cardigan that fits her like a sealskin.’
    • ‘Don't get yourself depressed searching for items of clothing that will fit you perfectly off the rack.’
    • ‘It was also clear to me as the viewer that the equipment she was using was not sized to fit her.’
    • ‘Although many fire guards can be adjusted to fit a range of widths, check that the guard you buy is suitable for your style of fire and make sure that it is firmly secured.’
    • ‘You can look amazingly sexy in beautiful plus size dresses that actually fit you and flatter your figure.’
    • ‘None of my size 10 clothes fitted me anymore, I was upset and became depressed just because my clothes size had gone up one level.’
    • ‘The trousers were a little long in the leg but other than that the clothes fit fine.’
    • ‘The three-point adjustable strap adjusts to fit all heads and helmets.’
    • ‘We have a large range of picture frames of all shapes and sizes to fit any photo, from a back yard snapshot to a professional portrait or even a personal artwork.’
    • ‘Try shoes on both feet and buy the size that best fits the larger foot.’
    • ‘A visible callus that forms on the feet is known as a corn and usually results from shoes that do not fit properly.’
    • ‘My jeans from Italy, for example, have no hope of fitting me any more.’
    • ‘And just where did he think I was going to get something to fit a child that size?’
    • ‘I find that a lot of professional clothing with a tailored look doesn't fit me well.’
    • ‘Forget about size when choosing clothes and choose something that fits well regardless of size and that's comfortable on you.’
    • ‘The crisp polo shirt and slacks fit him perfectly, setting off his muscular arms and blue eyes.’
    • ‘I looked around and grabbed a pair of trousers that actually fit me and a purple shirt, and also some undergarments.’
    • ‘To preclude gloves from wrapping around the bar, you have to choose the size that fits you well - not too tight, loose, small or long - just the right size.’
    • ‘Lydia wore her favorite blue dress, one from Maude's trunk, which Joscelyn had graciously altered to fit her.’
    be the correct size, be the right size, be the correct size for, be the right size for, be big enough, be small enough, be big enough for, be small enough for, be the right shape, be the right shape for
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1usually be fitted for Try clothing on (someone) in order to make or alter it to the correct size.
      ‘she was about to be fitted for her costume’
      • ‘Others may have looked at it and decided it was time he was fitted for one of those jackets with the long sleeves that tie round the back.’
      • ‘The preparations for the engagement event consisted mostly of Marigold and her mother being fitted for gowns at the Earl's expense.’
      • ‘The only scars from that 20-minute procedure are four barely visible dots around his head where he was fitted for a protective metal halo.’
      • ‘One of the most embarrassing moments in Deirdre's life was when she had to be fitted for protective clothing at work and they had to use two tape measures end to end to go round her.’
      • ‘When you are fitted for your tuxedo a small deposit is usually required.’
      • ‘Once I was fitted for my suit they told me it would be done by next week so I'd have enough time to qualify for the race.’
    2. 1.2no object , with adverbial of place Be of the right size, shape, or number to occupy a particular position or place.
      ‘Angela says we can all fit in her car’
      • ‘The shape of the carton fits more conveniently into home freezers.’
      • ‘The slightly ovoid shape fits nicely in your hand.’
      • ‘Science doesn't usually fit neatly into categories of all good or all bad.’
      • ‘These planes are normally characterized by their diminutive size so as to fit comfortably in their user's small hands.’
      • ‘The first prototype is small enough to fit in the palm of your hand.’
      • ‘Originally a pasty, it developed its characteristic shape to fit better into huntsmen's saddlebags.’
      • ‘Most of the eight Democratic candidates fit snugly into two categories.’
      • ‘Picking the strategy that best fits into your schedule will help you maintain optimum weed management.’
      • ‘Amazingly, the hermit crab's body is asymmetrically twisted so that it fits snugly into the shape of the shell.’
      • ‘The radio body fits nicely in a jersey pocket.’
      • ‘Drain the water and set the spears on a plate, and cut them to size so they can fit on top of the muffins without drooping over the sides too much.’
      • ‘Cut the slices of bread to a size that will fit inside your soup bowls, and toast them until dark brown on both sides.’
      • ‘Unlike other computers, PDAs are lightweight - designed to fit comfortably in a jacket pocket.’
      • ‘Spar have come up with ingenious pocket Eco Bag which is a small, wallet size bag that fits neatly into a pocket or handbag so you're always armed and ready to shop.’
      • ‘Actually, most of the girls in the drama club fit into this category.’
  • 2Fix or put (something) into place.

    ‘they fitted smoke alarms to their home’
    • ‘These could serve as additional bedrooms and there is plumbing in place to fit a shower room in one of them.’
    • ‘So he came round, and we positioned it and fitted the great drive-belt.’
    • ‘The team can fit grab-rails on staircases and in doorways, fix defective carpets or floor coverings, remove trailing wires and generally reduce trip hazards.’
    • ‘Work began on Monday to fit a disabled lift, due to be installed in May but delayed because the Italian manufacturer wasn't able to supply it until recently.’
    • ‘Power assisted steering, fitted as standard, makes manoeuvring the vehicle effortless.’
    • ‘Selby fire station has previously held car-seat open days, showing people how to properly fit child seats in cars.’
    • ‘They pronounced the pipework ‘impeccably installed’, and recommended we fit an independent water supply.’
    • ‘If not, why didn't you call a local Sky Installation Engineer to fit your dish?’
    • ‘After a medical centre in West Bowling was targeted by vandals, fences were fitted out of the centre's own funds.’
    • ‘Police have fitted new locks on the windows and doors since the break-in.’
    • ‘So fitting sensors in the rear rooms of the house and in the hallway is often considered sufficient for the ground floor.’
    • ‘Inspectors will look at whether the correct equipment is being used, work platforms are properly installed and scaffolding is securely fitted.’
    • ‘Adam, our installer, was fitting some other stuff and left to go on to another job whilst I changed 16 of the handles.’
    • ‘The announcement comes just a week after rail bosses responsible for redeveloping the railway station got round to fitting new clocks on the platforms, more than 18 months after the station revamp was completed.’
    • ‘A restraining net is fitted as standard, as is a decent luggage cover.’
    • ‘With his help, she has transformed the one-bed house in Crawley, West Sussex, fitting a new bathroom, installing storage, laying flooring and doing plenty of rewiring.’
    • ‘Mr Sanderson said one of the most successful schemes helped the victims of burglary being targeted a second time by swiftly fitting new locks on doors and windows.’
    • ‘Police are warning homeowners to fit strong locks on sheds and garages, cover windows with old curtains, install an expensive but noisy alarm and ensure that the household insurance policy covers the value of shed contents.’
    • ‘A council spokesman said today there was no council policy of fitting child locks on windows in York, although it did fit locks on replacement windows as a crime prevention measure.’
    • ‘One Sunday our neighbour says could I please ask our landlord to fit draft excluders on our front door.’
    lay, put in place, put in position, position, place, fix, insert
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1often be fitted with Provide (something) with a particular component or article.
      ‘most tools can be fitted with a new handle’
      • ‘She claims it was sheer luck that the blaze was caught in time, because her kitchen was not fitted with a smoke alarm.’
      • ‘Typically, a motorcycle may be fitted with a horn that would usually go on a jeep or a truck.’
      • ‘The airship will be fitted with cameras and infra-red equipment for night vision.’
      • ‘The car was fitted with a roll cage and sports seats and drivers had to wear crash helmets and be strapped in.’
      • ‘Her cot is fitted with a sleep monitor that sounds an alarm if her breathing stops.’
      • ‘Fire chiefs yesterday said that lives could have been saved if the house had been fitted with a smoke alarm.’
      • ‘The bag is fitted with a special alarm programmed to go off if someone reaches inside.’
      • ‘The coach was fitted with lap belts but parents are concerned they are inadequate to protect children.’
      • ‘Each table is fitted with a grill for you to cook the deliciously marinated meat.’
      • ‘Their front door was fitted with a Yale lock, two bolts and a security chain.’
      • ‘It is understood the vehicle used by the gang was also fitted with false number plates.’
      • ‘The cars are all left hand drive and had not yet been fitted with tracking devices.’
      • ‘The traffic car was fitted with child locks in the rear to prevent people escaping.’
      • ‘Make sure you lock windows and doors, which should be fitted with security deadlocks’
      • ‘She called for all new properties to be fitted with meters so people were aware how much water they were using.’
      • ‘The room is fitted with special low lighting and window blinds to allow fragile works to be displayed.’
      • ‘The massive bike was fitted with a stereo and a foghorn to attract the maximum amount of attention.’
      • ‘The kitchen has been fitted with new equipment and furniture will be replaced throughout the pub.’
      • ‘It is hoped the park will be fitted with floodlights and CCTV cameras for extra security.’
      • ‘The café has been fitted with a new kitchen and outside seating with parasols.’
      equip, provide, supply, fit out, rig out, furnish, outfit, endow
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2 Join or cause to join together to form a whole.
      with object ‘many physicists tried to fit together the various pieces of the puzzle’
      no object ‘it took a while to figure out how the confounded things fit together’
      • ‘You know what the picture's going to look like at the end, but you want to see how all the pieces will fit together.’
      • ‘Currently sheet metal barriers were being fitted together behind the factory.’
      • ‘Seven remain, which can be fitted together with only small gaps.’
      • ‘Instead, when you crack open this thing, all you get are busted pieces that don't fit together and don't work.’
      • ‘The seven pieces will never fit together to make any sense.’
      • ‘It just brings everything into balance and all the pieces fit together.’
      • ‘When these were fitted together, they were hammered to make the joint watertight.’
      • ‘As the pieces start to fit together the characters' dilemmas begin to take on a different shape.’
      • ‘The limestone is produced in special moulds and can be fitted together like a jigsaw to form any configuration.’
      • ‘The little pieces fit together, each part representing something small but vital.’
      • ‘Extra fuel tanks may need to be fitted together with spare jerricans.’
      • ‘Drawing a plan forces you to think through your project from beginning to end, what you are going to need and how your are going to get the pieces to fit together.’
      • ‘He wished to cut them into as few pieces as possible so that they could be fitted together, without waste, to form a perfectly square table-top.’
      • ‘Understanding how the three pieces fit together and what to do about them is a big part of choosing the right project and getting it done.’
      • ‘Finding which pieces fit together in order make the complete picture is one of the more difficult tasks.’
      • ‘It was a place where two separate pieces of metal fitted together, like the barrel of a lock.’
      • ‘These are fitted together and built up as you need them, providing a versatile solution to changing needs.’
      • ‘There is no doubt that a certain consistency of outlook is present throughout, but the pieces do not always fit together well.’
      • ‘What they didn't know is when or if the pieces would fit together.’
      • ‘Once inside you can see how the upper and lower receivers have been carefully fitted together by hand.’
      join, connect, put together, piece together, attach, unite, link, splice, fuse, weld
      View synonyms
  • 3Be in agreement or harmony with; match.

    ‘the punishment should fit the crime’
    • ‘I'd seen her once or twice at school, and she fitted the description Travis gave me of her perfectly.’
    • ‘Fast, simple and delicious, these dishes can be adjusted to fit your schedule, grocery list and occasion.’
    • ‘Take a volunteer position that fits your interest, and may even enhance your career goals.’
    • ‘She has adjusted her services to fit the customer's budget.’
    • ‘In some respects the description had fitted Naylor, while in others it did not.’
    • ‘However modern scholars claim that Newton sometimes adjusted his calculations to fit his theories.’
    • ‘The descriptions the woman gave fitted those of the two girls Tessa had seen before.’
    • ‘We can and should form opinions about guilt or innocence in the same as we form other opinions, by choosing the position that best fits the available evidence.’
    • ‘So if you fit any of these descriptions and are interested in auditioning, the producers would love to see you.’
    • ‘I haven't met anyone who fits the commonly held definition of sane.’
    • ‘I learned that the job description was written to fit the individual whom the department wanted to hire.’
    • ‘After a while, a newcomer walks in who perfectly fits the description of the spy her husband gave to her.’
    • ‘Ten minutes later there were a number of sightings close to the Brittons' home of a man fitting Mark Hobson's description.’
    • ‘I certainly don't fit any of the ideals presented in the media.’
    • ‘The Edmonton author, publisher, and former social worker has fit that description for at least 25 years.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, no candidate perfectly fits this description.’
    • ‘Canada's judges have moved boldly into the public policy arena, shaping laws to fit their own peculiar biases and ideologies.’
    • ‘Dewey observed that this model does not fit what we know about children.’
    • ‘It was clear that none of the six men who claimed to be at the warehouse could possibly fit the police officer's description.’
    • ‘He said: ‘It happened in the city centre and the man fits the same physical description.’’
    1. 3.1 (of an attribute, qualification, or skill) make (someone) suitable to fulfill a particular role or undertake a particular task.
      ‘an MS fits the student for a professional career’
      • ‘His freshness, his directness and his capacity for making connections with people both in person and on the television screen certainly fitted him for the task.’
      • ‘One biographer assumes that he was a boy of somewhat ordinary talents that would fit him only for the mercantile trade.’
      • ‘He regarded his own intellectual gifts and cast of mind as properly fitting him for the task.’
      • ‘His passion for lists, dates and details fits him well for this task.’
      • ‘Dr Cherry's specialisation and experience fitted him ideally for involvement in the development of the project.’
      • ‘I was playing the part of Polonius - a part my mature years obviously fitted me for.’
      qualify, prepare, make ready, make suitable, prime, condition, train, coach, groom, tailor
      View synonyms

noun

  • 1The particular way in which something, especially a garment or component, fits around or into something.

    ‘the dress was a perfect fit’
    • ‘Both the skirt and shirt were a perfect fit.’
    • ‘The harness is adjusted on the shoulder and waist straps for a perfect fit.’
    • ‘The pants have a roomy cargo pocket on the right leg and unhemmed cuffs so woman hunters can achieve the perfect fit.’
    • ‘If you find a pair of black pants or a skirt that are the perfect fit, consider buying more than one pair.’
    • ‘Perfect fit is accomplished when garments just skim the body, without pulling or sagging.’
    • ‘All new windows offer a tight fit between components to limit the rate of infiltration.’
    • ‘Not every shirt or jeans will have a perfect fit for everybody.’
    • ‘The pants feature a full elastic waistband and cuffs for a comfortable fit.’
    • ‘Despite the general lack of fit, the best fitting model seems to be the one-factor model.’
    • ‘Is your saddle a correct fit and not put too far up the back.’
    • ‘The dress was fabulous, a perfect fit, slim fitting with two thin shoulder straps and a more loose, flowing bottom part that ended just above the knee.’
    • ‘We look at clothing as an investment, so we consider the quality of a garment as well as the fit.’
    • ‘You might want to get your shirts altered at waist level to give them a slimmer fit.’
    • ‘Again, I strongly encourage choosing pants with a drawstring or an elastic waistband for an easy fit.’
    • ‘I got up and borrowed a pair of Jon's jeans which were the perfect fit.’
    • ‘Sometimes, you can help the fit of your garments by sewing these darts a little differently.’
    • ‘However, the shoulder seam plays a key role in the fit of garments that cover the upper body.’
    • ‘A belt that doesn't have holes is even easier, as it's fully adjustable for a perfect fit.’
    • ‘The firm has developed mathematical algorithms to simulate fabric drape and garment fit.’
    • ‘It means a lot to me; I didn't exchange it for the correct fit because I wanted the original one.’
    1. 1.1 The particular way in which a thing matches something else.
      ‘a close fit between teachers' qualifications and their teaching responsibilities’
      • ‘A great deal of the power and impact of the preached Word comes from the fit between the preacher and the words being preached.’
      • ‘It is also a way to gain knowledge of what is a good fit or match for your personality type.’
      • ‘Marketing is a dynamic process of ensuring a close fit between the capabilities of an organization and the demands placed upon it by its external environment.’
      • ‘The band may be sore because there's a close fit between their own fan base and the kind of campus kids who have got into illegal downloading big time.’
      • ‘There's a very good fit between the ideals of our two organisations.’
      • ‘The nurse must carefully examine the fit between the diagnosis and the client for whom it is intended.’
      correlation, correspondence, agreement, consistency, equivalence, match, similarity, resemblance, comparability, compatibility, affinity, concurrence
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2Statistics The correspondence between observed data and the values expected by theory.
      • ‘The greatest deviation from a good fit between the component figures occurs near the proximal end.’
      • ‘A smaller ratio score signifies good fit, and values near 2.0 are considered acceptable.’
      • ‘The results indicate a good overall fit of the model.’
      • ‘Accurate measurements of these parameters could lead to a better fit of the theory to experiment.’
      • ‘A thermal history involving two discrete episodes of heating and cooling clearly provides the best fit to the measured data.’

Phrases

  • fit to be tied

    • informal Very angry.

      ‘Daddy was fit to be tied when I separated from Hugh’
      • ‘We know that his family was fit to be tied with him during that time, and for good reason.’
      • ‘When she learns from the doctor that she's not sick after all but sound as a dollar, she's fit to be tied.’
      • ‘Those wee ones love the man and are fit to be tied when it's time for him to leave.’
      • ‘I listen to her set out her latest jargon-laden agenda for interfering in the lives and habits of British families, and after a few paragraphs I am afraid I am fit to be tied.’
      • ‘They clucked and fussed and were fit to be tied at the wanton waste they witnessed.’
      livid, furious, angry, infuriated, irate, fuming, raging, seething, incensed, enraged, angered, beside oneself, wrathful, ireful, maddened, cross, annoyed, irritated, exasperated, indignant
      View synonyms
  • fit to bust

    • informal With great energy.

      ‘they laughed fit to bust’
      • ‘Now, late in the evening, it's blowing fit to bust outside.’
      • ‘The flower beds are brimming with rhododendrons, the birds are singing fit to bust.’
      • ‘I get a face full of sherbet, in my eyes and up my nose and I'm coughing fit to bust.’
      • ‘It might be that they have snow blizzards up in Scotland just now but down here we've got grass growing, buds budding, and, to my great delight, huge swathes of snowdrops, flowering fit to bust.’
      • ‘Algernon laughed sufficiently for the two of them, wheezing and hee-hee-heeing fit to bust, having to support himself on Simpson's shoulder.’
      • ‘Everywhere you go there's someone coughing fit to bust and looking miserable, or cross, or plain old-fashioned resigned to their fate.’
      • ‘An hour later I woke from a vivid dream with my heart pounding away fit to bust.’
      • ‘I looked on in disbelief and her mother walked in and started screaming fit to bust.’
      • ‘The brother she mentioned is laughing fit to bust.’
      • ‘Already, his kitchen was full of brightly clad, bright-faced students talking fit to bust, helping themselves to coffee, and to stuff out of the pantry.’
  • see (or think) fit

    • Consider it correct or acceptable to do something.

      ‘why did the company see fit to give you the job?’
      • ‘Feel free to choose more or less as you see fit, but please explain why you picked them.’
      • ‘He needs to raise some money, so if you see fit, please make a donation.’
      • ‘You may add or subtract from my suggested text as you see fit, but please keep it polite.’
      • ‘I am pretty shocked that you thought fit to send this email out today.’
      • ‘Over the next six months, consider all your career options and make changes as you see fit.’
      • ‘The prime minister is free to do as he pleases when he sees fit.’
      • ‘I told the news editor he could break all the rules and do as he thought fit on the front page.’
      • ‘I am sure the learned trial judge felt she did her best to consider the arguments and rule as she saw fit, according to law.’
      • ‘Once it was confirmed that there was no further asbestos the site would be vested in the community, which could decide to use or dispose of it as they thought fit.’
      • ‘I have not had any academic training in film-making and planned the shots the way I thought fit.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • fit in

    • 1(of a person) be socially compatible with other members of a group.

      ‘he feels he should become tough to fit in with his friends’
      • ‘On an endless search for what is needed to fit in and be socially acceptable, all sense of self is lost.’
      • ‘Does your teen have trouble fitting in at school?’
      • ‘What if he realized how little she fitted in with those he loved?’
      • ‘Other issues included feelings of social isolation, with students saying they had difficulties fitting in because of a culture clash between university and their home life.’
      • ‘She was confident of fitting in socially but, during her first term, the workload caused a few concerns.’
      • ‘I never fitted in with the cool kids, and trying to do so was making me unhappy as a teenager.’
      • ‘I never fitted in with the Catholic community of my home.’
      • ‘They may have poor social skills, have problems fitting in and probably cannot meet the expectations of their family or school.’
      • ‘Early on, his drinking was linked to loneliness and an inability to fit in socially with his fellow players.’
      conform, be in harmony, belong, blend in
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1(of a thing) be in harmony with other things within a larger structure.
        ‘produce ideas that fit in with an established approach’
        • ‘This fitted in with the free trade approach of the time.’
        • ‘Needless to say, the service was attentive, without being overbearing, and fitted in with the relaxed, classy atmosphere.’
        • ‘He said the deals were ‘a good package’ and fitted in with their strategy of expanding on both sides of the Atlantic.’
        • ‘People were satisfied and extremely elated with the overall results, as they fitted in with the concept of a truly national party, even on face value.’
        • ‘The drive to increase access to universities fits in with New Labour pronouncements on social inclusion and the ilk.’
        • ‘Helen Kidman, chairman of Ilkley Civic Society, said the guide was meant to inspire finer architecture that fitted in with the surrounding area.’
        • ‘Throughout the meal we were treated to a varied array of music which fitted in with the friendly atmosphere of the pub.’
        • ‘It was none the less an amusing portrayal, which fitted in with the high spirits of the evening if not into the household.’
        • ‘This fits in perfectly with the general social and economic policy of the SPD-Green government.’
        • ‘‘We picked up the project because it was a good idea and because it fitted in with our health agenda,’ said a spokesman.’
      2. 1.2(of a person or thing) constitute part of a particular situation or larger structure.
        ‘where do your sisters fit in?’
        • ‘Where do you see broadband and videostreaming fitting into your plans?’
        • ‘Where did you see yourself fitting into all that?’
        • ‘She just wasn't fitting into his plan at all tonight.’
        • ‘They are training very hard and have acquired a number of new players this year that are fitting into the team very well.’
        • ‘We don't have any children of our own yet but I don't see how any child of ours would fit into such a situation.’
        • ‘How do you see those alliances fitting into your long-term business plan?’
        • ‘It certainly fits into my plans to really look at mammals to understand birds better.’
        • ‘He has been in tremendous form and is a fantastic talent who fits into Saints' future plans.’
        • ‘He has not been hampered by timidity or uncertainty, fitting into the side with calm assurance and revealing the extent of his ability.’
        • ‘What I hope is that the coaching staff and my team-mates think that I'm steadily getting better as a player and fitting into the team.’
  • fit someone/something in (or into)

    • 1Find room or have sufficient space for someone or something.

      ‘can you fit any more books into the box?’
      • ‘The space inside seems too small to fit the elaborate furniture in the room.’
      • ‘There is enough room to fit the power cable in there, but I think a bit more space would make it easier for people with large hands to connect and disconnect the cable.’
      • ‘I have been focusing on fitting my things into the very limited space this apartment affords.’
      • ‘He only just fit his belongings into the room, cramming his clothes and most of his toys into the roll-out drawers and using the shelves for his books and stand-alone objects.’
      • ‘If your club/organisation is missing out on valuable publicity for vital fundraising events, we will always find space each week to fit you in.’
      • ‘And it could be the answer to the prayers of weekend shoppers who frequently struggle to fit their vehicles into precious spaces.’
      • ‘He disappeared without payment when he had completed the extraordinary task of fitting a spiral staircase into a space deemed impossibly small.’
      • ‘Do you think that some people don't realise that there is a trade off, that okay if you don't want to have high-rise, you're going to have to take up more space to fit people in?’
      • ‘I have, however, seen that people with slightly larger cars have experienced difficulty trying to fit their cars into the spaces.’
      • ‘There was not enough room to fit people in and no access for the disabled.’
      1. 1.1Succeed in finding time in a busy schedule to see someone or do something.
        ‘you're never too busy to fit exercise into your life’
        • ‘Mr Simpson said on both occasions that he was unable to fit the openings into his busy calendar of events.’
        • ‘How do you fit your workouts into such a busy schedule?’
        • ‘We've been looking to play this venue for ages, because it is such a good reputation, but either we were busy or they were busy and couldn't fit us in.’
        • ‘The organisers were hoping the champion runner would fit the event into her busy schedule.’
        • ‘I tried to eat well and exercised when I could fit it into my busy life.’
        • ‘Johnny raised his eyebrows and shrugged, ‘I suppose I could fit you into my extremely busy schedule.’’
        • ‘Just follow our 10 steps for fitting a new activity into an already busy lifestyle, and you'll be sure to achieve success.’
        • ‘Added to the business of choosing a topic, I must also consider where I will fit the actual writing into my schedule.’
        • ‘This enabled her to decide when she worked and to fit it in around her busy schedule, which included picking up the kids from school.’
        • ‘I fitted my degree into a busy fire service life - it was a case of interrupted study for six years.’
  • fit someone/something out (or up)

    • Provide with the necessary equipment, supplies, clothes, or other items for a particular situation.

      ‘the cabin had been fitted out to a high standard’
      • ‘The properties can be fitted out at a cost of €15,000.’
      • ‘The cells are fitted out with televisions, sanitary and tea making facilities.’
      • ‘The interior of both buildings are fitted out with the highest of standards of modern fittings.’
      • ‘And the opportunity is not restricted to the able-bodied - the vessel is fitted out to accommodate people of all types of physical ability and disability.’
      • ‘He said doctors on duty will have a taxi available to them at all times to drive them to patients and the car will be fitted out with high quality medical equipment, like a mini-ambulance.’
      • ‘The Learning and Skills Council spent £40,000 on refurbishing space at the station, fitting it out with six new computers with Internet access, printers, a digital camera and scanner.’
      • ‘On leaving the school the boys were fitted out with clothes and given a bible and a Book Of Common Prayer.’
      • ‘These houses are fitted up in first-rate style, with gas and water laid on.’
      • ‘The next four weeks will be very busy fitting it out with furniture and equipment and making it clinically clean.’
      • ‘The bathrooms are fitted out in granite, oak and glass.’
      equip, provide, supply, furnish, kit out, rig out, outfit, accoutre, array, stock
      View synonyms
  • fit someone up

    • Incriminate someone by falsifying evidence against them.

      • ‘He added: ‘After 27 years of being a thorn in the side of the police they fitted him up for something serious to put him away for a long time.’’
      • ‘The confessor's claims that Stuart had been fitted up shook the parochial world of late 1950s Australia, a country just waking up to the notion of civil rights.’
      • ‘He told the Standing Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs he had been fitted up with the help of covert recordings for falsely accusing police officers of corruption.’
      • ‘Your basic complaint is that they fitted you up for something you did not do.’
      • ‘Thus does the movie have its cake and eat it: the drama and glamour of real mob violence, plus the sentimental suggestion that our Charlie was fitted up.’
      • ‘We need people who have the skills to smell out somebody who comes along to try to fit us up.’
      • ‘He admitted in early 1997 he was a prime suspect for the murder and conducted a series of interviews denying the charge and claiming police were out to fit him up.’
      • ‘That was a really pathetic job of fitting someone up.’
      falsely incriminate, entrap, fabricate charges against, fabricate evidence against
      View synonyms
  • fit something on

    • Try on (a garment).

      • ‘I always fit the clothes on myself because that way I can feel the garment.’
      • ‘They do offer you the opportunity to try and fit the clothes on you want.’

Origin

Late Middle English: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

fit

/fɪt//fit/

Main definitions of fit in English

: fit1fit2fit3

fit2

noun

  • 1A sudden uncontrollable outbreak of intense emotion, laughter, coughing, or other action or activity.

    ‘in a fit of temper’
    ‘he got coughing fits’
    • ‘In a fit of fury Calvert who was known to be a violent and irrational person burst into Smedleys home and hurled a heavy stone ornament at him.’
    • ‘He was suddenly seized by a fit of panic.’
    • ‘Her mother's fits of anger and the threats and beatings dealt to the girl resolve themselves in a grudging acceptance of the financial favours handed out by the lover.’
    • ‘Hearing such music does not usually send you into a fit of rage immediately.’
    • ‘He was frantically jealous, beat her, begged forgiveness in fits of remorse which became as repellent as his rage, and demanded she abort the pregnancy that came along in the second month of the hasty match.’
    • ‘Another time, while Elie is working at the electrical warehouse, he goes on one of his fits of rage and beats the boy.’
    • ‘He acknowledges these fits of anger, such as the one that caused him to slay his wife with an ax, but he nevertheless shows some remorse for what he has done.’
    • ‘If at all he became angry, he would keep quiet rather than burst out in a fit of temper.’
    • ‘He even had his own wife murdered in a fit of jealousy.’
    • ‘He is prone to fits of jealousy when he sees Primrose in the company of another male.’
    • ‘To leave now would suggest that he'd gone in a fit of pique.’
    • ‘Reane, in a fit of pure rage, slashed him across the back.’
    • ‘Alex is extremely intelligent with a propensity for fits of anger and uncontrollable rage.’
    • ‘Yes, authors and creators can suffer fits of pique that can hurt the markets for secondary works.’
    • ‘He lives off the earnings of his wife, Eva, succumbs to fits of paranoia and anger, engages in a desultory affair, hates the physical decay around him and is haunted by the prospect of death.’
    • ‘The model is already facing claims from three former assistants who say she allegedly assaulted them in fits of rage.’
    • ‘Lisa suffers from fits of sudden rage and unbearable fatigue.’
    tantrum, fit of temper, outburst of anger, outburst of rage, frenzy, fury
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A sudden attack of convulsions and/or loss of consciousness, typical of epilepsy and some other medical conditions.
      ‘he thought she was having a fit’
      • ‘If the child has a history of epilepsy, it can be difficult to tell the difference between febrile convulsions and epileptic fits.’
      • ‘Kirstie has had epilepsy since she was 18 and until recently suffered daily epileptic fits.’
      • ‘Concerned about the number of fits Slater was having, her doctor decided to operate to disconnect the right and left hemispheres of her brain.’
      • ‘If the child has fits, they may be prescribed anticonvulsant drugs.’
      • ‘His frequent fits result in painful injuries, and medication has failed to control the traumatic episodes.’
      • ‘Julie Ann now suffers from daily fits and seizures.’
      • ‘Febrile convulsions are fits that sometimes happen in a child with a high temperature.’
      • ‘Othello, told by Iago that Cassio has admitted sleeping with Desdemona, falls into a fit.’
      • ‘One prisoner suffered an epileptic fit, and all the others shouted for help.’
      • ‘Her ordeal began in November when she started having fits and convulsions despite no previous history of health problems.’
      • ‘His master and friends all said he was a clever, well-behaved boy, and had never been known to have fits, or walk in his sleep.’
      • ‘The problems began after the woman was admitted to a medical ward in a local hospital suffering from fits and nightmares.’
      • ‘He collapsed and died suddenly after not suffering an epileptic fit for several years.’
      • ‘It is believed he suffered a fit as he was watching a football match.’
      • ‘She cannot work as she now suffers frequent, violent epileptic fits.’
      • ‘At his parents' Flamborough home, his condition worsened, and he suffered several prolonged epileptic fits.’
      • ‘Alexandra has cerebral palsy, is confined to a wheelchair and suffers from frequent epileptic fits.’
      • ‘During this state one keeps on getting epileptic fits without regaining consciousness in between.’
      • ‘Her sister, Lucy, suffers from cerebral palsy and epilepsy and is often treated in York Hospital for fits and chest infections.’
      • ‘Always phone for an ambulance if a fit lasts longer than five minutes.’
      convulsion, spasm, paroxysm, seizure, attack
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • have (or throw) a fit

    • informal Be very surprised or angry.

      ‘my mother would have a fit if she heard that’
      • ‘His mother had a fit, so they married again on New Year's Day 1937, this time with the family present.’
      • ‘They were used to him throwing a fit when he was in bad mood.’
      • ‘This hardly seems like the kind of thing to be throwing a fit about.’
      • ‘Mother will be having a fit if she knows I'm sitting out in the cold air - for even though it seems warm she'll fuss.’
      • ‘If people don't want to listen to what he wants to listen to, he throws a fit.’
      • ‘I was in a line of folks standing behind a woman at the bookstore who was throwing a fit because the clerk could not find the copy of The Great Gatsby she'd called to reserve.’
      • ‘The rental company is sent away by the filming crew and my friend's husband throws a fit.’
      • ‘My mother would have a fit if she knew I spent a lot of time at Deane's.’
      • ‘You know my mother will throw a fit if she sees me like this.’
      • ‘Better get a move on so mother doesn't throw a fit when I get back.’
  • in fits (of laughter)

    • informal Highly amused.

      ‘he had us all in fits’
      • ‘We collapsed in fits, the tutor had overheard and was almost wetting herself, and the 5 others were demanding to know what we'd said.’
      • ‘There was a time when circus was a popular form of entertainment - with acrobats and bold ring-masters to whose crack of the whip wild animals played awesome tricks and the clowns left packed audiences in fits.’
      • ‘At one point, she had the audience in fits.’
      • ‘Once we were out of harm's way, we all ended up breaking down in fits of uncontrollable laughter - partly to relieve the tension of the near-miss situation, but mostly because of the absurdity of what had just happened.’
      • ‘His quick wit and confident delivery had the audience in fits of laughter.’
      • ‘Eventually, after half an hour rolling around on the floor in fits of laughter, I managed to regain my composure.’
      • ‘Both the staging and acting are universally superb and we were in fits of laughter throughout.’
      • ‘For starters, I was in fits of laughter at the sight of him, and his swearing and shouting just made me worse.’
      • ‘The rest of us collapsed in fits of laughter at poor old Dave.’
      • ‘Peter had one of the locals in fits of laughter when he was doing a line dance.’
  • in (or by) fits and starts

    • With irregular bursts of activity.

      ‘the machine tends to go forward in fits and starts’
      • ‘We played in fits and starts and never really clicked and opened up, but we're happy with the points.’
      • ‘Progress has come in fits and starts and is still fragile.’
      • ‘All too often, science progresses in fits and starts, re-examining data, reinterpreting evidence - a path that can be hard to accept in medicine, when answers are needed now.’
      • ‘Like my wife's slimming programme, this year's harvest is going in fits and starts, punctuated by incredibly hot days of activity and frustrating rest periods.’
      • ‘The poetry is moving forward in fits and starts.’
      • ‘The improvement came slowly, sporadically, in fits and starts.’
      • ‘It was built in 1961, and it's been renovated in fits and starts, so it's sort of an architectural Frankenstein.’
      • ‘The Roman occupation of Britain advanced in fits and starts with the occasional disaster - the bloody revolt of Queen Boadicea in 61 AD is the best known example.’
      • ‘I've started adding mine, but it'll be done in fits and starts…’
      • ‘However, like in any sport, those who play well throughout the whole contest - not just in fits and starts - more often than not end up victorious.’
      spasmodically, intermittently, sporadically, erratically, irregularly, interruptedly, fitfully, haphazardly, on and off, off and on, now and then, now and again
      View synonyms

Origin

Old English fitt ‘conflict’, in Middle English ‘position of danger or excitement’, also ‘short period’; the sense ‘sudden attack of illness’ dates from the mid 16th century.

Pronunciation

fit

/fɪt//fit/

Main definitions of fit in English

: fit1fit2fit3

fit3

(also fytte)

noun

archaic
  • A section of a poem.

    • ‘When the knight is introduced in a later fytte of the poem, he is called Sir Richard-at-the-Lee.’
    • ‘Percy has written a long ballad in many fits: it is pretty enough.’
    • ‘The balance of this first fytte consists mostly of lengthy dialogue detailing the knight's impoverishment.’

Origin

Old English fitt, perhaps the same word as fit, or related to German Fitze ‘skein of yarn’, in the obsolete sense ‘thread with which weavers mark off a day's work’.

Pronunciation

fit

/fɪt//fit/