Definition of firth in English:

firth

noun

  • A narrow inlet of the sea; an estuary.

    • ‘Right in the cobbled heart of historic South Queensferry, it is at its best in summer, when decking and an outdoor terrace offer al fresco dining with great views over the firth.’
    • ‘I dug around in my pack and found my notebook, wrote a while, exchanged greetings with dog walkers, but for the most part just looked out over the firth and breathed the cool clean air.’
    • ‘If you must travel across the firth then use the Kincardine Bridge or go round on the M9.’
    • ‘Experts said tolls for motorists would have to be in excess of the present 80p charged to cross the firth - rising to £1 in October - to recoup costs within an acceptable time-scale.’
    • ‘It was then stationed off Fife Ness to guide ships approaching the firths of Tay and Forth.’
    • ‘But the lights of the killer fleet still glittered in the firth.’
    • ‘One plane I would like to find here is the Junkers 88a bomber that crashed several miles south of the firth near Aberlady Bay.’
    • ‘The port, once famous for shipbuilding, had a sizeable whaling fleet, and operated a ferry across the firth to Granton until 1939.’
    • ‘But the fact these rigs are in the firth at all is bad news.’
    • ‘The path leads you out to the headland with spectacular views over the firths.’
    • ‘It is often difficult to see, and certainly less noticeable than the oil rigs in the firth.’
    • ‘Enjoying spectacular views across the firth, it was refashioned in 1916 for the admiralty and enjoyed the patronage of successive generations of the royal family until the late 1980s.’
    • ‘The project would be in addition to the new £89m road crossing already planned 14 miles upstream in the upper firth to take pressure off the existing bridge.’
    • ‘The company's plan has already attracted more than 430 objections, from both Scottish and English sides of the firth.’
    • ‘In Andrew's day they had drifted up and down the firth lifting nets dripping with moonlight and herring.’
    • ‘Overlooking the firth of Clyde, the castle's central defensive keep was built in about 1200, with the rest of the castle constructed around it in 1580.’
    • ‘He told her the tales of the sea lochs and the firths that decorated the coast.’
    • ‘He is a likeable chap and as much a well-loved local icon as Inverness Castle and the nearby firth's dolphins.’
    • ‘German U-boats would wait silently in the firth for targets.’
    • ‘It suggests flooding and erosion will be particularly serious in the Forth, Tay, Clyde and Dornoch firths and that the nation will have to give up some homes to the sea.’
    hollow, depression, dent, dint, cavity, concavity, dip, pit, trough, crater
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Origin

Middle English (originally Scots), from Old Norse fjǫrthr (see fjord).

Pronunciation

firth

/fərθ//fərTH/