Definition of figure in English:

figure

noun

  • 1A number, especially one which forms part of official statistics or relates to the financial performance of a company.

    ‘official census figures’
    ‘a figure of 30,000 deaths annually from snakebite’
    • ‘Indeed, Die Welt reported on Friday that it had obtained a copy of the latest unemployment figures not due for official release until this week.’
    • ‘In 1978, financial figures revealed that the average house price in London was £16, 731.’
    • ‘Does he have any figures on the increase of respiratory illness?’
    • ‘Those are not figures that are just plucked out of the air; they are official police figures used to compile statistics.’
    • ‘The college's intake from state schools is 94 per cent compared with last year's figure of 89 per cent.’
    • ‘The company's latest sales figures are down nearly 8 per cent on a year ago.’
    • ‘The Bank's move came despite today's official figures showing inflation rising to its highest level for two years.’
    • ‘Today's attendance figures at those galleries and exhibitions would have astonished and thrilled curators in the 1960s.’
    • ‘On Friday came fresh figures on the economy and on retail sales.’
    • ‘Use these figures to calculate loss of future business due to customer dissatisfaction.’
    • ‘Passenger revenue was calculated using population figures, surveyors' road traffic counts and the passenger rates of similar lines.’
    • ‘It cites official figures that show crime rising steadily over 40 years.’
    • ‘As a privately held company it did not publish financial performance figures.’
    • ‘The country has nearly 100 million Internet users, according to official figures, and the figure is rising.’
    • ‘No attendance figures were released, but only 1,500 of the 7,000 published programmes were sold.’
    • ‘Though precise figures are unavailable, anecdotal estimates rarely vary.’
    • ‘Lambeth has become cleaner and greener, with latest performance figures showing a slight rise in recycling rates.’
    • ‘As is often the case with trade statistics, figures quantifying the value of pirated Caribbean music are difficult to find.’
    • ‘Similar results this time will mean a much closer election than today's poll figures suggest.’
    • ‘All the figures are taken from official statistics, and exclude employees who do less than one hour of unpaid overtime a week.’
    • ‘In 1998 there were 52, and last year's figures are likely to be similar.’
    statistic, number, integer, quantity, amount, level, total, sum
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    1. 1.1 A numerical symbol, especially any of the ten in Arabic notation.
      ‘the figure 7’
      • ‘Lucian drew a sideways figure 8 in the air beside Mark.’
      • ‘Millar is preparing for the opening time trial wearing a number that ends with a figure 1.’
      digit, numeral, numerical symbol, character
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    2. 1.2 One of a specified number of digits making up a larger number, used to give a rough idea of the order of magnitude.
      ‘their market price runs into five figures’
      in combination ‘a six-figure salary’
      • ‘The cost savings will be between six and seven figures.’
      • ‘They don't want you to know that reps are working about 20 to 30 hours a week while pulling down close to six-figure salaries.’
      • ‘One of these youths stole a four-figure sum from me recently and I am now very apprehensive.’
      • ‘You should be prepared for the possibility of lower investment yields in the future - likely to be in single figures.’
      • ‘This FA Cup third round tie is cue, presumably, for a typical Fulham gag-fest, a joke or two about keeping the score in single figures.’
      • ‘Our inflation rate has been in single figures, moving between 2 percent and 4 percent.’
      • ‘Considering that this is aimed at children of ages in single figures, it's not necessarily the most uncomplicated arrangement.’
    3. 1.3 An amount of money.
      ‘a figure of two thousand dollars’
      • ‘The gross for the final session was up 14.2% over last year's figure of $1,160,500.’
      • ‘Within the letter, the figure of ‘$500,000 a year’ is noted repeatedly.’
      • ‘In the 18 months since the meters were introduced, they had not even managed to bring in half of the break-even figure of about £4,500.’
      price, cost, amount, quantity, value, valuation, quotation, quote, rate
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    4. 1.4figures Arithmetical calculations.
      ‘she has no head for figures’
      • ‘His father sent him off to college to study business administration, but Gallagher says he wasn't any good at figures.’
      • ‘Lee took the maps and calibrators and ran a few figures and calculations and looked at the Admiral.’
      • ‘I am terrible at maths and even worse at figures, but I trust all my advisers because they are basically friends as well.’
      • ‘The man thought this over for a few seconds, calculating figures in his head.’
      • ‘A natural affinity for figures - he used to help his father's bookkeeper - got him a start in accountancy.’
      • ‘She has a first in mathematics, so she clearly has a head for figures.’
      arithmetic, mathematics, sums, calculations, reckoning, computation, numbers, statistics, counting
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  • 2A person's bodily shape, especially that of a woman and when considered to be attractive.

    ‘she had always been so proud of her figure’
    • ‘She will be proud to show her figure as she will pose in sexy lingerie of her choice.’
    • ‘For artists, the beauty and complexity of the human figure is the prime impetus for painting it.’
    • ‘Amy's figure was very slim, with long legs, arms, and a slender neck.’
    • ‘He couldn't sleep at night, only thinking of her slim and attractive figure with a good-natured mind.’
    • ‘The girls were fashionably attired but not overdressed, with attractive figures and lovely faces.’
    • ‘It may seem obvious, but when the human figure is portrayed in art, it is either clothed or naked.’
    • ‘She does not dress scantily when exercising, even though she has an attractive figure.’
    • ‘Sally can offer advice on colours and what shapes suit your figure.’
    • ‘It's good mentally because you have to be alert the whole time and it's great physically because it really keeps your figure in trim.’
    • ‘She looks ravishing, with an hourglass figure that is beyond comprehension.’
    • ‘At 82, he remains a tall, dashing figure and a serious charmer.’
    • ‘The pants really flattered her figure.’
    physique, build, frame, body, proportions, torso, shape, form, stature
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    1. 2.1 A person seen indistinctly, especially at a distance.
      ‘a backpacked figure appeared in the distance’
      • ‘Bryony spotted the lone figure emerging from the water, the current lapping at his body.’
      • ‘She screamed even louder when the door suddenly opened and a dark figure suddenly appeared.’
      • ‘A shadowy, hooded figure emerged from the forest and approached me.’
      • ‘As she rode out of the woods she noticed a lone figure sitting on the white fence near the stable.’
      • ‘Mark's heart was pounding as a hooded figure appeared in front of him.’
      • ‘She squinted suddenly at what appeared to be two figures in the distance.’
      • ‘When I did awake I noticed a shadowy figure standing over me.’
      • ‘Elizabeth looked up and past Jesse, seeing a tall dark figure appear from the elevator.’
      • ‘The streets were dark and all but deserted; we only saw two figures off in the distance in the dim streets.’
      • ‘The three survivors stood in silence as a lone figure appeared in the dark shadows of the doorway.’
      • ‘As Stefansson made his way across the ice and snow, he saw figures in the distance approaching him.’
      • ‘Derick looked up to see a shadowy, cloaked figure.’
      • ‘As Dan turned, the slim figure hurled him bodily against the far wall.’
      • ‘By the time the dust died down, they were but four figures on the distant horizon.’
      • ‘Occasionally, we spot a lone figure emerging on the horizon.’
      • ‘There was no one nearby but she saw figures running in the distance.’
      • ‘A dark figure emerged from one side of the street and another from the other side.’
      • ‘Through the blur of the falling rain, Tracy notices a hooded figure dressed in black.’
      • ‘I saw a figure in the distance walking with a pronounced limp.’
      • ‘In an answer to her question, Rena saw a cloaked figure standing before her.’
      silhouette, outline, shape, form, profile, shadow
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    2. 2.2 A representation of a human or animal form in drawing or sculpture.
      ‘starkly painted figures’
      • ‘It contains twenty-eight tapestries, 118 sculpted figures and forty-one paintings.’
      • ‘As a child, he had sculpted small animal figures from riverbank clay.’
      • ‘Sumida pottery is a heavy, brightly glazed pottery and often has human and animal figures attached as reliefs.’
      • ‘Surrealistic and abstract human figures instead dominate his oil paintings.’
      • ‘Small clay figures, human and animal, were modelled and placed as offerings on mountain peak sanctuaries.’
      • ‘Although Monet mostly painted nature scenes, he sometimes included human figures in his paintings.’
      • ‘The sculptures are mainly human and animal figures, although one is based on cartoon character Shrek.’
      • ‘Those with painting skills display their talent by drawing eye-catching figures in attractive hues.’
      • ‘The sculpture consists of two figures facing one another, the one on the left male, and the one on the right female.’
      • ‘Like Manet, Degas painted figures in the studio rather than outdoors.’
      • ‘But Ghirlandaio does not depict busts or statues, his figures are shown as though alive within an illusionistic setting.’
      • ‘Painter John Wesley is known for his flatly painted, cartoonish canvases of figures and animals.’
      • ‘His pursuit of beauty continues to this day, as he quietly goes about his daily tasks of carving stone sculptures and casting concrete figures.’
      • ‘For 18 years, he ferried pieces of junk and debris on his bicycle to the municipal site and worked by night to shape the figures.’
      • ‘The figures lack the sculptural quality of those in the Asnieres painting.’
      • ‘The modeling and outline of the figures showed sculptural solidity.’
      • ‘For, in his frames, there is always the presence of figures blending into each other - forever in a rush to complement each other.’
      • ‘His human and animal figures, reduced to mounds, slabs and tubes, possess a quiet grace.’
      • ‘The presence of the shadow-like figures in each of her canvases only serves as a suggestion to set her mind on capturing the movement and rhythm.’
      • ‘His other sculptures are figures of saints, the Holy Virgin, Christ and of ordinary people.’
      human representation, image of a person, effigy
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  • 3A person of a particular kind, especially one who is important or distinctive in some way.

    ‘Williams became something of a cult figure’
    • ‘He became a leading figure in the early working class movement in Britain.’
    • ‘Many of Ireland's most prominent historical figures are contained in the archive, as well as pictures of Ireland.’
    • ‘Cultural heroes are important figures in the folklore of Polynesian societies.’
    • ‘Fraenkel, von Neumann, Bernays and Gödel are all important figures in this development.’
    • ‘A native of the Auvergne, he became a leading figure in the regionalist movement in France.’
    • ‘It was decided that portraits of historical figures who have made important contributions to culture and art should be sculptured.’
    • ‘He's up there with Jacques Chirac in terms of being a durable figure on the world stage.’
    • ‘An opera forgotten for more than 100 hundred years tells the story of one of Skipton's most important historical figures.’
    • ‘Abacus has brought out paperback titles relating to two important figures in twentieth century intellectual thought.’
    • ‘Ibrahim said the draft bill calls for schools to form committees with parents, local government officials and public figures.’
    • ‘But Johnson and Boswell were not the only literary figures to be attracted to these western islands.’
    • ‘He's not the most attractive public figure but he certainly isn't the least.’
    • ‘His chief European rival, Saint-Exupéry, was a complex but more attractive figure.’
    • ‘Cobain became the figurehead, the cult figure, the hero to some.’
    • ‘The main figure on whom Baxter relied was Randall.’
    • ‘But despite the author's best efforts, he does not emerge from these pages as an attractive figure.’
    • ‘Certain literary figures have attracted special scrutiny, in recent years none more so than Samuel Johnson.’
    • ‘In many cases it is perfectly reasonable to accept the conclusions of authority figures one trusts.’
    • ‘Among those who died in the hijacked planes were a television producer, an actor, sports officials, media figures and captains of industry.’
    • ‘Later that month as public concern about the costs of the dome grew Sanchia Berg spoke to leading figures in the visitor attraction industry.’
    person, personage, individual, man, woman, character, personality, presence
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  • 4A shape which is defined by one or more lines in two dimensions (such as a circle or a triangle), or one or more surfaces in three dimensions (such as a sphere or a cuboid), either considered mathematically in geometry or used as a decorative design.

    ‘a red ground with white and blue geometric figures’
    • ‘Now if you thought these lines referred to geometric figures, you would not be too far wrong.’
    • ‘In particular he proved that the sphere was the solid figure of greatest surface area for a given volume.’
    • ‘He observed that ideas of shapes or figures, like the triangle, were ideas of things he had not invented or conjured up.’
    • ‘Odd shapes and geometric figures swam in and out of Dawn's consciousness.’
    • ‘The simplest way to look at it is this: actually, neither of the two larger figures shown are triangles.’
    shape, pattern, design, motif, device, depiction
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    1. 4.1 A diagram or illustrative drawing, especially in a book or magazine.
      ‘figure 1 shows an ignition circuit’
      • ‘Figure 1b shows the results obtained for = 0.001 with the swap step.’
      • ‘The book utilizes tables and figures effectively to illustrate the main concepts of each chapter.’
      • ‘The data from each plate were then graphed and analyzed (Figure 1A).’
      • ‘Lesions are often associated with main leaf veins (Figure 2A and 2B).’
      • ‘The text is well illustrated with excellent diagrams, sketches and figures.’
      diagram, illustration, drawing, picture, plate, graphic, sketch, chart, plan, map
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    2. 4.2 (in skating) a movement or series of movements following a prescribed pattern and often beginning and ending at the same point.
      • ‘In receiving the award Jered follows in his mother's footsteps - she is listed on the trophy three times, as a gold test skater in figures, freestyle, and pairs.’
      • ‘For the rare skater who is still involved in skating figures, one final aspect of the used blades market is the practice of converting used freestyle blades into patch blades.’
    3. 4.3 A pattern formed by the movements of a group of people, for example in square dancing or synchronized swimming, as part of a longer dance or display.
      • ‘Every year, during the figure dancing season, each class has an opportunity to host a Feis.’
      • ‘It has dance movements, or figures, that might remind you of traditional square dancing.’
      • ‘Included are figure dancing, solo dancing, recitations, music and novelty acts.’
      • ‘Elspeth was using her hands to explain something about the dance figures.’
      • ‘Congratulations also to Spa and Glenflesk also for winning the All Ireland also in set dancing and figure dancing.’
      • ‘The figures of these dances mapped a circuitous route back to Ireland - not just an imagined return but an embodied recovery.’
      • ‘Most Irish figure dancing or step dancing is carried on behind closed doors.’
    4. 4.4archaic The external form or shape of something.
  • 5Music
    A short succession of notes producing a single impression.

    • ‘Their textures are dominated by right-hand melodies against chordal accompaniment figures.’
    • ‘Melodic figures are treated circularly, giving the piece a minimalist sound.’
    • ‘Warm melodic figures are juxtaposed with harsher percussive patterns, setting up some fascinating contrasts in sound.’
    • ‘Every melodic figure had its replica, every phrase, its counterpoise in his music.’
    • ‘When the broad flowing melody is allowed to return, that is eventually interrupted with a striking five note figure for muted brass.’
  • 6Logic
    The form of a syllogism, classified according to the position of the middle term.

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1Be a significant and noticeable part of something.

    ‘the issue of nuclear policy figured prominently in the talks’
    • ‘Not surprisingly, race figured prominently in the cases in the 1994 study.’
    • ‘Scotland may figure in the government's compromise deal, though not for the right reasons.’
    • ‘It feels as if Haentjens has things to say about Plath that don't figure in this novel.’
    • ‘Although they will not get all that they want, there were signs last night that the issue will figure in the summit's final action plan.’
    • ‘The state of the economy and of the overall battle against terrorism should also figure in a major way.’
    • ‘Scarborough will have the same squad on duty at Rushden tomorrow as the one that figured in the 1-0 defeat of Altrincham on Wednesday.’
    • ‘Figures due out on November 21 might be instructive but a merger deal is not thought likely to figure in the statement.’
    • ‘Political parties have always figured prominently in Congress since the earliest days of the American Republic.’
    • ‘But pressure is integral to F1 and fear has failed to figure in the careers of either driver.’
    • ‘Class interest barely figures in the totalitarian approach.’
    • ‘Here we are confronted with the first of many social dilemmas which are to figure in the young Carver's life.’
    • ‘The Connemara Market at Palayam, a village market-place under a tree and even a modern market figured among the paintings.’
    • ‘Now, however, imagine her rescue figuring on the nightly analysis slot of some channel.’
    • ‘Women's boxing is yet to figure in the Olympics but is gaining ground.’
    • ‘This is a subway stop that just doesn't figure in the mythology of New York.’
    • ‘This scandal has even figured in the American presidential election.’
    • ‘How well you handle them will figure in any estimate of your future potential.’
    • ‘The Clark holdings played no small part in these events; they also figured prominently in the critical counterpunch.’
    • ‘In the ensuing decade, Performance has regularly figured in lists of the best British films.’
    feature, appear, be featured, be mentioned, be referred to
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    1. 1.1 (of a person) play a significant role in a situation or event.
      ‘he figured largely in opposition to the bill’
      • ‘In the middle and long distance events Sligo athletes figured prominently in almost every distance from 300 metres to 3,000 metres.’
      • ‘Constable is one of the few major artists to figure in Bermingham's narrative.’
      • ‘Men in York, meanwhile, reach, on average, 75.7 and don't figure in the top 50 at all.’
      • ‘Scott McGarrahan will figure in the mix once he is re-signed after cap room is cleared.’
      • ‘Teenager James Reveley, son of trainer Keith, and grandson of Mary, can figure in the spotlight at Chester tomorrow.’
      • ‘Of the two former Celtic managers Jansen, currently director of scouting at Feyenoord, may figure in the search again.’
      • ‘Although race walking is his forte, he has figured in this event a number of times and finished third three years ago in a time of 20:20.’
      • ‘An exemplary soldier, freedom fighter, potter or weaver could also figure in the list.’
      • ‘What he could say for sure, as of last Wednesday, was that Barry Ferguson would not figure in a summer deal to free up cash.’
      • ‘One of them, Argentinian striker Gustavo Fuentes, may even figure in the squad to face Rangers this evening.’
      • ‘Although he is unlikely to figure in the first team this season, Smith will be looking to impress Francis and secure his future at the club.’
      • ‘Half-back Mark Dooley will figure in Sunday's trip to Doncaster Dragons after teaming up with the Wasps this week.’
      • ‘The country's former king is likely to figure in any such equation.’
      • ‘A more familiar name to Yankee fans and foes who may figure in their bullpen plans is lefty Randy Choate.’
      • ‘The Clydesdale all-rounder has yet to figure in the plans of new coach Peter Drinnen.’
      • ‘Garciaparra may ultimately figure in a comeback story destined for Hollywood.’
      • ‘Chris Burgess, a dog in his two years at Duke, is eligible and will figure in the mix.’
      • ‘Designers drool over her body and she routinely figures on International Best Dressed lists.’
      • ‘If Craig Gordon wants to figure in the Scottish squad with long-term confidence it looks like he will have to move to an Old Firm club.’
      • ‘These girls were expected to be a force in this competition, but they will need to up their game if they are going to figure in the final shake down.’
    2. 1.2 (of a fictional character) play a part in a novel, play, or movie.
      ‘the four characters who figure in Ridley's play’
      • ‘Isolated characters figure in two of the most interesting of the several Asian films.’
  • 2North American with object Calculate or work out (an amount or value) arithmetically.

    • ‘The change in tree cover over time was figured by comparing Landsat TM satellite images from 1985 and 2001.’
    • ‘I figure that a bodybuilder has to eat at least six times a day to grow, which is 42 meals a week.’
    • ‘You won't even have to rack your brains over calculating taxes since they've already figured it out for you on the menu.’
    calculate, work out, total, sum, reckon, compute, enumerate, determine, evaluate, quantify, assess, count, add up, put a figure on, tally, totalize, gauge
    View synonyms
  • 3North American informal with clause Think, consider, or expect to be the case.

    with object ‘for years, teachers had figured him for a dullard’
    ‘I figure that wearing a suit makes you look like a bank clerk’
    • ‘I figured this last revelation would give him something to think about, but he barely flinched.’
    • ‘They figured most people would go there at one point.’
    • ‘I'd done it a few times, but figured the money wasn't really worth it.’
    • ‘He figured this person would make an excellent singer.’
    • ‘Investors figure that the purchaser will pay a high price for the company.’
    • ‘It's not exactly revelatory information, but I figured someone out there might find it useful.’
    • ‘I figured this idea could make me a millionaire, but it looks like someone beat me to it.’
    • ‘From the sound of his voice I figured the person who walked in was young.’
    • ‘I figured the radical transformation of the world's energy supply would be of personal interest to them.’
    • ‘They figure that the more control they have over applications, the more they'll be able to charge.’
    • ‘But I figured the only people who were reading my blog when I wrote these were Maccers and Snowy, so I might get away with it.’
    • ‘By the time he got downstairs it had stopped ringing but he figured the person might still be there.’
    • ‘There were actually a lot of people outside, which was weird since it was a Saturday and I figured people were tired.’
    • ‘I figured people would be asking that question, but what you see in the movie is kind of our take on that.’
    • ‘I stood up, walked around, drank some water and figured it was just a passing phase.’
    • ‘Sighing heavily, Joan figured this conversation had gone on long enough.’
    • ‘Wiley figured the water level must have risen from all the rain they had received the day before.’
    • ‘Miriam left for school an hour early because she figured the peace protesters would make it hard to get to class.’
    • ‘I figured people might be getting bored of reading about me all the time’
    • ‘I figure that if I stand around and look helpless, someone will at least offer to buy me a drink.’
    suppose, think, believe, fancy, consider, expect, take it, suspect, have a sneaking suspicion, sense
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1 (of a recent event or newly discovered fact) be logical and unsurprising.
      ‘well, she supposed that figured’
      • ‘That figured and didn't surprise him, though he wished Harry would just have a normal conversation instead of locking him in a room.’
      • ‘Given the turmoil in the auction world, it figures that the firm would be looking for new, larger quarters.’
      • ‘Sure, that figures, if you're going to drive with that kind of load at high speed you're bound to damage something.’
      • ‘It would figure that this great hog, this glorified genre gourmand, would want more.’
      make sense, be understandable, seem reasonable, stand to reason, be to be expected, be logical, follow, add up, stand up, hold up
      View synonyms
  • 4with object Represent (something) in a diagram or picture.

    ‘varieties of this Cape genus are figured from drawings made there’
    • ‘An adopted daughter, who would not be represented in the tree that is figured, would nevertheless form part of the unit.’
    • ‘Losing oneself in the movie is not figured as pleasurable, but sets up, rather, a mode of helplessness in the face of an opaque and fragmented story line.’
    • ‘However, the mutual acknowledgement of the other only occurs when their death is figured as inevitable.’
    • ‘There is something very odd about the way the revolution is figured, and the oddness goes beyond the closing scene.’
    1. 4.1usually as adjective figured Embellish (something) with a pattern.
      ‘the floors were covered with figured linoleum’
      • ‘Reflecting the changing styles, the single-cutaway guitar featured a flat, figured maple top.’
      • ‘The shapes are highly varied - cylinders, prisms, animals - and the designs range from abstract patterns to figured images of people and animals.’
      • ‘It has superbly figured timber, a majestic curvaceous profile and spectacular mounts that echo in gilt-bronze the carved detail on the jewel cabinet.’

Phrases

  • figure of fun

    • A person who is considered ridiculous.

      • ‘Briefly enjoying a career as a figure of fun, the bankrupt former minister now hardly figures at all.’
      • ‘He can't do anything else; he's impotent, useless, obsolete, a figure of fun even to the reader.’
      • ‘He looked like an advert for ‘cricket trousers for the fuller figure’, but this portly batsman was no figure of fun.’
      • ‘They started out as figures of fun, but I felt their perspectives ought to be as valid as anyone else's in the book.’
      • ‘Fear of turning into such a pathetic figure of fun, I'm sure, is why I have adopted a pre-emptive strike when it comes to admitting my age.’
      • ‘Hair thinning, waists thickening, faces falling, they are held up to us as figures of fun.’
      • ‘Put like that, he doesn't seem much like a figure of fun.’
      • ‘What was not clear last night was whether it would leave him a tarnished man, or enable him to shake off his image of being a dull, boring figure of fun.’
      • ‘Jesters of the past, though figures of fun at the royal court, were often highly intelligent men whose quick wit and sharp tongue both diverted the monarch and reminded him of his mortality.’
      • ‘If I was wandering around telling people to shop less, eat less, borrow somebody's old clothes, I'd quickly become a figure of fun.’
      figure of fun, object of ridicule, dupe, butt, fool, joke, standing joke, everybody's fool, stooge
      View synonyms
  • lose (or keep) one's figure

    • Lose (or retain) a slim and attractive bodily shape.

      • ‘She wasn't well-educated, had no profession and had lost her figure and gone to fat.’
      • ‘Now by no means am I obese or anything, but I actually have to work at keeping my figure, not that I have much of one.’
      • ‘She always managed to keep her figure somehow.’
      • ‘Why worry about life - you'll only end up losing your figure!’
      • ‘If she wants to become an actress, she needs to keep her figure.’
      • ‘Alex you never pass up a meal and it still amazes me how you can keep your figure!’
      • ‘You may be confused by my lack of appetite, but I honestly don't know how you manage to keep your figure with all that sugar!’
      • ‘He shops and cooks for her - ‘I fell in love and lost my figure’ - and she is deliriously happy.’
      • ‘Mother, I can hardly expect to attract Evan's attention if I don't keep my figure.’
      • ‘I tease her sometimes about how she keeps her figure.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • figure on

    • Count or rely on something happening or being the case in the future.

      ‘anyone thinking of salmon fishing should figure on paying $200 a day’
      • ‘I had figured on Sunday being the busy drive day - I guess I wasn't alone in that assessment.’
      • ‘They figured on holding the auditions in three days, depending on how many people responded.’
      • ‘I was figuring on leaving the leftovers in the break room in case anyone wanted a snack.’
      • ‘I was sure it wouldn't matter to him that I was figuring on ditching her as soon as I was let out.’
      • ‘I wasn't expecting another plane, I figured on a car to take us to Hot Springs,’ Muriel said.’
      • ‘Protecting the nation from a dictator was not something they figured on having to do when they were planning to build a new nation.’
      • ‘Mom, about the slumber party how many guests were you figuring on?’
      • ‘We weren't counting how many people would be bereft if we died, because we weren't figuring on dying.’
      • ‘I had figured on being serious at some points - writing my usual novel length posts about life and the world - but this has been much more entertaining for me.’
      • ‘She was figuring on getting a tree and since we have one and haven't used it in two years I figured maybe she could borrow it,’ Alison said.’
      plan on, calculate on, count on, rely on, bank on, bargain on, depend on, pin one's hopes on
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  • figure something out

    • Solve or discover the cause of a problem.

      ‘he was trying to figure out why the camera wasn't working’
      • ‘As soon as you start pursuing the process of figuring each problem out, and connecting it with other problems, you have started down the road to leftism.’
      • ‘Finally, I would say, please understand that I am still figuring this thing out, just like everybody else.’
      • ‘I recently saw this book again at the bookstore, and memories of the event came rushing back to me, even though right now I have absolutely no idea what the book is about or the significance of figuring it out.’
      • ‘And we will have figured it out for no other reason than to know.’
      • ‘First the basic framework needs to be worked out then the name can be figured out, after all what is a name without something to go with it?’
      • ‘Most jurors like to believe that they can really figure this whole puzzle out a little better than the lawyers can.’
      • ‘Jade looked up to her mommy with a warm smile her small eyes with one of those curious looks they got when she had either solved a problem or had figured something out.’
      • ‘It's a personality quirk, I know, but I enjoy taking something and making it whole and figuring things out.’
      • ‘I have done all this for her, yes, but mostly for me, because by writing about how hard a time I've had figuring this whole thing out I've found a bigger piece of who I am, and I like that piece.’
      • ‘Now, assuming I can still sleep because I'm thinking about that, when I wake up it will be figured out.’
      work out, make out, fathom, reason, puzzle out, decipher, solve, ascertain, make sense of, think out, think through, get to the bottom of, find an answer to, find an solution to, unravel, untangle
      View synonyms
  • figure someone out

    • Reach an understanding of a person's actions, motives, or personality.

      • ‘I imagine that strangers have even a harder time figuring him out.’
      • ‘I've spent a lot of time over the past few months trying to figure you out.’
      • ‘‘I really can't figure you out,’ I say to him on one of my rare visits back into that dark office.’
      • ‘Basically, they're trying to figure you out and see if you run like prey or stand your ground.’
      • ‘But if someone's trying to figure you out, that is hard.’
      • ‘As for the other guy - you'll figure him out soon enough.’
      • ‘It seems we need to figure someone out before we strike up a conversation.’
      • ‘We told her that she might not want to talk to us because she might go crazy trying to figure us out.’
      • ‘But, if you think I am for such an agreement, you haven't figured me out yet.’
      • ‘When she figures him out, she will understand herself.’
      find out, discover, come to know, get to know, work out, make out, fathom, fathom out, become aware of, learn, ferret out, dig out, dig up, establish, fix, determine, settle, decide, verify, make certain of, confirm, deduce, divine, intuit, diagnose, discern, perceive, see, realize, appreciate, identify, pin down, recognize, register, understand, grasp, take in, comprehend
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Origin

Middle English (in the senses ‘distinctive shape of a person or thing’, ‘representation of something material or immaterial’, and ‘numerical symbol’, among others): from Old French figure (noun), figurer (verb), from Latin figura ‘shape, figure, form’; related to fingere ‘form, contrive’.

Pronunciation

figure

/ˈfiɡyər//ˈfɪɡjər/