Definition of fedora in US English:

fedora

noun

  • A low, soft felt hat with a curled brim and the crown creased lengthwise.

    • ‘Inside, there are dusty shelves stocked with classic felt fedoras and poor-boy caps against every wall.’
    • ‘A black, grungy trench coat hung loosely over his lanky frame, and his face was hidden in the darkness under a fedora hat.’
    • ‘Choose from wool caps, classic fedoras or straw Panamas for men and women and a charming line for children.’
    • ‘Shutting his locker, he shifted the brim of his fedora slightly.’
    • ‘He's wearing a black tee-shirt, a black fedora and black jeans - so it's not surprising he's almost melting into the night.’
    • ‘Wearing fedoras and top hats comes back into fashion in 2016.’
    • ‘The people walk hand in hand, the men in suits, ties and fedoras, long-legged women in wide-brimmed hats, wearing dresses down to their ankles.’
    • ‘The dancers are dressed unisexly in suits and ties, raincoats and fedoras (the brims pulled down), the colours drab brown or slate.’
    • ‘Kelly turns out suede fedoras with handmade ribbon trim and antique coconut buttons.’
    • ‘He was tall and wore a floppy fedora and a dirty tweed jacket.’
    • ‘Work a vintage fedora, tam or veiled hat into your wardrobe for a bit of uptown chic.’
    • ‘With rolled up sleeves, they definitely suit those of you with boatie hats, or fedoras (I like to think I can advise the minority too).’
    • ‘Any vintage fedoras you find will almost certainly be too small (perhaps men had smaller heads in the Forties, but I have never found a vintage hat that fits).’
    • ‘Two shady characters in trenchcoats and fedoras stopped by the station, talking, and he listened in on their conversation.’
    • ‘Straw hats are great summer hats with plenty of sex appeal, but nothing beats the feel of a felt fedora in the cold.’
    • ‘Young men in baseball caps and trainers are offered lessons in the wearing of trilbies and fedoras, and many people volunteer for ‘hat doffing’ classes, led by the splendidly monikered, and splendidly bearded, Torquil Arbuthnot.’
    • ‘Just because I'm on a one-woman mission to bring back fedoras and leg warmers doesn't mean you have to be.’
    • ‘Now can you get everyone into wearing fedoras again, too?’
    • ‘In contrast, the dress code was strictly 1930s gangster chic, with the men in pinstripes and fedoras while the women sported shawls and feathered caps.’
    • ‘An old black and white photo of Hoxsey dressed in a bow tie and a fedora holding up a bottle of tonic doesn't help his case.’

Origin

Late 19th century (originally US): from Fédora, the title of a drama (1882) written by the French dramatist Victorien Sardou (1831–1908).

Pronunciation

fedora

/fəˈdôrə//fəˈdɔrə/