Main definitions of fawn in English

: fawn1fawn2

fawn1

noun

  • 1A young deer in its first year.

    • ‘In Central and Eastern Oregon, coyotes take 90 percent of the antelope fawns.’
    • ‘‘We found that elk, bison, moose, even the fawns, wouldn't move away unless a machine was stopped and a person started walking,’ he says.’
    • ‘Of course the original snowdoll melted in the end, and also some of the younger deer - fawns - used to lick it, which didn't help, but there you go.’
    • ‘I also spotted lots of white-tail fawns, some with chaperones.’
    • ‘Years of overgrazing have reduced the forage supply and largely eliminated cover for newborn fawns.’
    • ‘It did occur to me that if she fell over the fawns by mistake the deer might get quite cross about it, but fortunately, she didn't.’
    • ‘In six of the pairs, the fawns had different sires.’
    • ‘If we just leave it to chance, we can't bank on these fawns making it to reproductive age.’
    • ‘Most of their predation of deer is on fawns, although several members of a pack could bring down an adult.’
    • ‘Bucks are serial breeders, so more females mean more fawns and a bigger herd.’
    • ‘Young fawns who can't jump the fence may impale themselves on the metal as they try to crawl underneath.’
    • ‘Deer travel in small bands consisting of mothers, their grown daughters and fawns.’
    • ‘Over her average 10-year lifespan, a doe and her daughters can produce up to 100 fawns.’
    • ‘There is also the loss of wild life, especially deer and their young fawns who graze high on the mountain slope and shelter in the forestry.’
    • ‘Domestic dogs that roam free have been known to revert to their primal instincts and to attack and kill lame deer and fawns.’
    • ‘In recent years, fewer than 10 fawns per 100 does have survived, a rate that pronghorn experts say will inevitably lead to extinction of the herd.’
    • ‘In milder years, the herd of 12 does and fawns which migrates through my yard are much more selective in their tastes.’
    • ‘Mating is timed for deer birthing in late May or early June, when there is sufficient food and cover to assure fawn survival.’
  • 2A light yellowish-brown color.

    • ‘On the top of the skirt, it had fawn mesh a little longer than the actual dress, but black flowers were embroidered on it.’
    • ‘Instead of the usual grim-faced republican flag-bearers in black berets, khaki jumpers and dark glasses there was a genteel parade of men in green blazers and fawn slacks.’
    • ‘He was about three inches taller than her, with gray blue eyes, and a dusting of fawn colored freckles dotting his nose and cheeks.’
    • ‘Their fleece is favoured by spinners and weavers world wide for both the texture and the various colours of true non-fading black through to a brilliant white, with reds, roans, pintos, browns, fawns, rose and charcoal greys.’
    • ‘The calf is fawn coloured, a colour which distinguishes it from the adults a great deal.’
    • ‘The colour balance of the look is tasteful and sedate, so grey, brown, fawn or navy tailoring works best.’
    • ‘The colour range includes fawns, blues and claret.’
    • ‘Eye-witness reports suggest the plane was a high-wing single engine aircraft, fawn coloured and brown underneath.’
    • ‘When we did a show we wore the light fawn jacket as worn by drivers and conductors during the summer.’
    • ‘He was wearing a white linen tunic and light fawn colored pants that covered his plain brown boots.’
    • ‘His facial fur was dark fawn with lighter streaks running back into his ruff, his eyes a glacial green.’
    • ‘She wore her shoulder length fawn colored hair pulled back into a ponytail at the nape of her neck.’
    • ‘Mature plants, which often grow wider than they grow tall, develop a good framework of stems with flaky fawn bark.’
    • ‘My test car came in metallic green that complemented the delightful fawn interior and Momo leather seats.’
    • ‘Foliage dwellers vary in colour from fawn to brown or bright green.’
    • ‘They are the descendants of an ancient population of fawn or brown coloured cattle which originally came from Asia.’
    • ‘The fawn color varies in hue from tan to stag red.’
    • ‘The missing dogs have a wrinkled skin and are fawn in colour.’
    • ‘The four-year-old girl, who is deaf, took the art lesson one step further by drawing a long green line on the Prince's fawn coloured suit.’
    beige, yellowish-brown, pale brown, buff, sand, sandy, oatmeal, wheaten, biscuit, café au lait, camel, kasha, ecru, taupe, stone, stone-coloured, greige, greyish-brown, mushroom, putty
    View synonyms

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • (of a deer) produce young.

Phrases

  • in fawn

    • (of a deer) pregnant.

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French faon, based on Latin fetus ‘offspring’; compare with fetus.

Pronunciation

fawn

/fɔn//fôn/

Main definitions of fawn in English

: fawn1fawn2

fawn2

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1(of a person) give a servile display of exaggerated flattery or affection, typically in order to gain favor or advantage.

    ‘congressmen fawn over the President’
    • ‘That evening, once everyone had stopped fawning over Jen, the girls partied in their hotel room eating all the snacks they could bring back from the store.’
    • ‘I am what you call one of those extremely handsome young men that girls fawn over.’
    • ‘But let me tell you this, I will not fawn over you just because you have loads of money.’
    • ‘It's disgusting, actually, the way she fawns all over him and then drools over Cale when his back is turned.’
    • ‘He knew clearly what Chinese rule meant, but not only did he sell out his own conscience by fawning on China, he also wanted other people to join him in this masochistic ‘pleasure.’’
    • ‘He always had lot of girlfriends, and people fawning over him.’
    • ‘The dance-hall girls would fawn over him each time he stepped into the saloon for a drink.’
    • ‘You also get people fawning all over you because they've seen you on television.’
    • ‘On Monday, a parade of European diplomats paid him a visit in Ramallah, complimenting his speech and fawning over him like devoted fans greeting a television star.’
    • ‘If you loved him before, you'll probably fawn over this picture.’
    • ‘Considering how the media fawns on the ultra rich, we hear remarkably little about them.’
    • ‘Luckily, Dylan was awake, so they could fawn over him some more.’
    • ‘He could have people fawning over and around him if he wanted, if that was what he wished.’
    • ‘Just because all the girls fawn over you doesn't mean you're that good-looking.’
    • ‘‘You really are as nice as they say,’ Harry said, fawning over Hannah as if she were his Lord and Savior.’
    • ‘It's not fair how beautiful girls fawn over you.’
    • ‘People are fawning over you because you are their man of the moment.’
    • ‘Are there any musicians that you would fawn over if you had the chance?’
    • ‘This is in keeping with Alex's fawning and childish devotion to the inauthentic.’
    • ‘But soon you'll be making millions of dollars and girls will be fawning over you and you'll be the greatest rock star in the world.’
    • ‘Lila, stop fawning over Nicky and make yourself useful!’
    obsequious, servile, sycophantic, flattering, ingratiating, unctuous, oleaginous, oily, toadyish, slavish, bowing and scraping, grovelling, abject, crawling, creeping, cringing, prostrate, uriah heepish
    be obsequious to, be sycophantic to, be servile to, curry favour with, pay court to, play up to, crawl to, creep to, ingratiate oneself with, dance attendance on, fall over oneself for, kowtow to, toady to, truckle to, bow and scrape before, grovel before, cringe before, abase oneself before
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of an animal, especially a dog) show slavish devotion, especially by crawling and rubbing against someone.

Origin

Old English fagnian ‘make or be glad’, of Germanic origin; related to fain.

Pronunciation

fawn

/fɔn//fôn/