Definition of fault in English:

fault

noun

  • 1An unattractive or unsatisfactory feature, especially in a piece of work or in a person's character.

    ‘my worst fault is impatience’
    • ‘I do not know the faults of your character, nor do I think you know mine.’
    • ‘While there are some glaring faults in character and plot, it is a mostly enjoyable trip with some very nice eye candy.’
    • ‘I do this far too often, and it's probably my worst fault.’
    • ‘But throughout the book the occasional faults matter little against the poetry's terrible aliveness.’
    • ‘Jealousy is reputed to be one of their worst faults, but Taureans are no more inclined to jealousy than any of the other signs.’
    • ‘That was one of her worst faults, she felt an urge to find out everything about everybody.’
    • ‘If you made a car with as many problems, faults and features and some software I could mention, it would fail.’
    • ‘I fell in love with this character despite his obvious faults.’
    • ‘I have seen some of the worst faults of the world.’
    • ‘There are many faults in my character but sitting indoors fiddling with html code while the sun shines and the birds sing is not among them.’
    • ‘He's a complex character with many faults and makes mistakes.’
    • ‘We may reflect that we all suffer from faults of character, or fail, if severely tempted, to resist temptation.’
    • ‘The only fault in the character is one of writing, not acting.’
    • ‘The civility with which they acknowledge their faults is a positive characteristic, one associated with real culture.’
    • ‘Does your main character have faults of his own?’
    • ‘However, it's not enough to overcome the book's faults.’
    • ‘Whatever its faults, the book appears to be a chick magnet.’
    • ‘Character faults and foibles surface slowly and are dealt with compassionately.’
    • ‘I know that's one of my worst faults: being too polite, even when I shouldn't be.’
    • ‘Of course a possible variation of the tragic concept would allow a character to have a fault which leads to consequences far more dire than he deserves.’
    flaw, failing, deficiency, weakness, weak point, weak spot, shortcoming, fallibility, frailty, infirmity, foible, inadequacy, limitation
    flaws, faults, faultiness, irregularity, abnormality, distortion, deformity, malformation, misshapenness
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A break or other defect in an electrical circuit or piece of machinery.
      ‘a fire caused by an electrical fault’
      • ‘All power supply circuits are protected by a ground fault detection system to prevent overloads and short circuits.’
      • ‘Forensic scientists said the cause of the blaze was a build up of fluff in the dryer, which ignited the machine, and not an electrical fault, the inquest heard.’
      • ‘The testing ranged from correcting simulated electrical faults on a Mack truck to fixing ABS breaks and earth-moving equipment.’
      • ‘It cost €162,186 last year to carry out standard maintenance and repairing electrical type faults on public lights in the county.’
      • ‘Investigators found cigarettes, a box of disposable lighters and an empty bottle of whisky in her flat, but no evidence of any electrical or gas faults.’
      • ‘It was also known to have a history of power and electrical faults.’
      • ‘Time stood still for beer-lovers on campus last week, as the beer-taps at Eastside broke down due to an electrical fault.’
      • ‘They believe the fire was started by a cigarette butt or an electrical fault.’
      • ‘But fire investigators found a number of other electrical faults and fire risks in the house, an inquest in Bradford was told yesterday.’
      • ‘It is believed the cause of the fire was an electrical fault in the wiring of an electric immersion heater.’
      • ‘The alarm was raised around 6.45 pm after an electrical fault caused the machine to ignite at the property in Hermes Way.’
      • ‘The blaze was caused by a fault on an electric extractor fan and the brigade has now issued the family with smoke alarms.’
      • ‘They say faults could lead to electric shocks or a risk of fire.’
      • ‘The problems have been attributed to computer software failure and electrical faults.’
      • ‘The problem, affecting 26 lights, was due to a circuit fault and was fixed by EDF Energy staff by September 30th.’
      • ‘These included everything from brake and electrical faults to corrosion of the load-bearing points on their chassis.’
      • ‘Problems on the railways were further compounded by electrical faults at Oxenholme on Sunday and Monday.’
      • ‘Over 85 per cent of all fire deaths occur in the home, and up to four per cent of fire deaths in London are caused by electrical wiring or appliance faults.’
      • ‘He dismissed speculations that the fire was ignited by electrical faults or caused by foul play.’
      • ‘If there is a fault in the computer power supply, or if the electric socket is wired incorrectly, the computer chassis can become live and give a fatal electric shock.’
    2. 1.2A misguided or dangerous action or habit.
      ‘it has been the great fault of our politicians that they have all wanted to do something’
      • ‘Indeed, if Monica has a fault, it's an excessively trusting nature, a habit of putting loyalty before sense.’
      • ‘I felt very emotional during the service, my lip trembling on several occasions, and I slipped into my usual fault of speaking softly when that happens.’
    3. 1.3(in tennis and similar games) a service of the ball not in accordance with the rules.
      • ‘All tosses should be hit: if they throw the ball up, it's going to be a fault if they catch it.’
    4. 1.4(in show jumping) a penalty point imposed for an error.
      • ‘No one was coming in from there without time faults.’
      • ‘Ward scored four faults on each mount with Sasha getting the higher placing based on a better time over the 15-jump course.’
      • ‘The pair had a rail down at the double combination to finish with four faults in a time of 41.72 seconds.’
      • ‘That decision brought him home with no jumping faults, but garnered him 3.2 time faults for a final score of 50.41.’
      • ‘Ben showed great determination and skill over both courses putting up seven faults in show-jumping and a superb clear over the cross-country course.’
      • ‘Torano scored four faults for one rail down at the sixth fence and finished with a time of 41.148 seconds.’
      • ‘At this level the riders are not timed, but penalties are awarded for faults such as refusal to jump or knocking down a fence.’
  • 2Responsibility for an accident or misfortune.

    ‘an ordinary man thrust into peril through no fault of his own’
    ‘it was his fault she had died’
    • ‘That fact, however, does not, in my judgment, acquit the claimant of any responsibility or fault for the accident that so arises.’
    • ‘But it wasn't all my fault; the computer had again malfunctioned, and I was actually up at almost 15,000 feet.’
    • ‘I admit that some of the antagonism between myself and various health services has been my fault.’
    • ‘Through no fault of their own, these defendants were not trained in the regulations that govern the demolition of chimneys.’
    • ‘These 18 people died through no fault of their own.’
    • ‘He said that the availability of harmful material on the internet was no more the fault of the internet service provider than it was of the personal computer being used.’
    • ‘Not all SEOs are bad, but if you fail to research and you buy bad services that is the fault of the buyer.’
    • ‘Most of the time, a fall in popularity is the own fault of the game developers.’
    • ‘The organisation does not compensate uninsured drivers who are involved in accidents and hurt through no fault of their own.’
    • ‘I never really got into it, though I gather that was more my fault than the game's.’
    • ‘It isn't my fault these characters have a mind of their own.’
    • ‘Or perhaps it is the fault of the central character, Oliver himself.’
    • ‘If users happened to be trading pirated music it was no more their fault than it's the fault of the postal service if people mail home-taped cassettes to one another.’
    • ‘Maybe it's my own fault for reading books that don't feature an elf or an alien on the cover.’
    • ‘The officer replied saying it was not his fault but the rules were that we have not got enough points.’
    • ‘These signs will provide some recognition for road victims who died through no fault of their own.’
    • ‘Sorry, but it's not my fault you don't service Minneapolis.’
    • ‘Any horrible things that happen to these hapless characters are my fault!’
    • ‘It's not their fault that the rules are archaic.’
    • ‘But fault was still a feature in many divorce cases, since irretrievable breakdown had to be shown in one of five ways.’
    responsibility, liability, culpability, blameworthiness, guilt
    View synonyms
  • 3Geology
    An extended break in a body of rock, marked by the relative displacement and discontinuity of strata on either side of a particular surface.

    • ‘Iranian leaders have promised to rebuild the town, which is on a major earthquake fault line.’
    • ‘Unlike ridges and trenches, transform faults offset the crust horizontally, without creating or destroying crust.’
    • ‘Questions have also been raised over the possibility of a earthquake fault line nearby.’
    • ‘Most transform faults are found on the ocean floor.’
    • ‘Transform faults, on the other hand, slide horizontally against one another.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Criticize for inadequacy or mistakes.

    ‘her colleagues and superiors could not fault her dedication to the job’
    ‘you cannot fault him for the professionalism of his approach’
    • ‘But critics fault military leaders for discouraging such actions and failing to present alternatives.’
    • ‘The intentions were good, which is why Brooke couldn't really fault him.’
    • ‘Still, we can hardly fault the school for its pessimism.’
    • ‘They were wrong, but you can't fault their logic.’
    • ‘In a keenly fought contest, neither team could be faulted for the lack of effort.’
    • ‘Of course, the group is composed of ‘creative types’ so you can't fault them for being creative with the truth.’
    • ‘Ultimately they love their cats and I can't fault them for that.’
    • ‘Hence, it is difficult to fault him for taking part in the decision.’
    • ‘While I can't fault her for professionalism, at the very least I would have expected a smile, or, really, any show of emotion at all.’
    • ‘I cannot fault the arithmetic logic that as the population increases, so should the number of representatives in Parliament.’
    • ‘You could hardly fault Smith for wallowing in the music and the magic of this remarkable moment.’
    • ‘A correspondent rightly faults me for not giving the direct quotation.’
    • ‘So he can't fault us for raising these questions now.’
    • ‘Nor do I fault them for the work they've done in exposing the rot.’
    • ‘I can't fault you for what you thought was the truth.’
    • ‘Still, you can't really fault the lady with the torch on this one.’
    • ‘We were beaten fair and square but I can't fault the lads for effort.’
    • ‘One can hardly fault them for not having foreseen this shift.’
    • ‘So I don't fault him for his toughness and perhaps his arrogance.’
    • ‘Governments are rightly faulted for their dismal economic performance.’
    find fault with, find lacking
    criticize, attack, censure, condemn, impugn, reproach, reprove, run down, take to task, haul over the coals
    complain about, quibble about, carp about, moan about, grouse about, grouch about, whine about, arraign
    knock, slam, hammer, lay into, gripe about, beef about, bellyache about, bitch about, whinge about, nitpick over, pick holes in, sound off about
    slag off, have a go at, give some stick to, slate, rubbish
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1archaic [no object]Do wrong.
      ‘the people of Caesarea faulted greatly when they called King Herod a god’
      • ‘Each time she faulted, she would silently curse herself as the wrong note amplified itself in the empty hall.’
      • ‘She faulted, and the linesman, as ever, shouted ‘out’.’
  • 2Geology
    (of a rock formation) be broken by a fault or faults.

    ‘rift valleys where the crust has been stretched and faulted’
    ‘a complex pattern of faulting’
    • ‘Does lithology account for the very different patterns of faulting in the Permian sandstones and dolostones?’
    • ‘At the other extreme, reverse faulting could cause the pattern of exhumation and basin inversion.’
    • ‘The original form of these basins has been modified by subsequent faulting, Red Sea rift flank uplift, and erosion.’
    • ‘The seismic data show faulting of the subsurface sediments, possibly as dikes were injected into the center of the basin.’
    • ‘The structural relations of these formations are complicated by extensive thrust faulting.’

Phrases

  • at fault

    • 1Responsible for an undesirable situation or event; in the wrong.

      ‘we recover compensation from the person at fault’
      • ‘The public demands that someone is held to account for these things no matter who is at fault.’
      • ‘Let's just hope we eventually have a clear picture of went wrong and who was at fault.’
      • ‘The second exception to the general rule occurs when a party is at fault in employing wrong or defective procedures.’
      • ‘If both have been at fault then both should be held responsible.’
      • ‘If anyone is at fault in this situation, it's the restaurateur who has chosen a wine that may or may not be good.’
      • ‘It is wrong, and the person committing the crime is entirely at fault.’
      • ‘In my mind, I knew that I wasn't at fault, but that didn't stop me feeling deeply responsible.’
      • ‘Meanwhile, the officials at fault try to discharge their public duty by denying responsibility.’
      • ‘I think the local government officials were still deeply at fault in some ways.’
      • ‘It is not always the players who are at fault and referees must he accountable.’
      to blame, blameworthy, blameable, censurable, reproachable
      culpable, accountable, answerable
      responsible, guilty, in the wrong, offending, erring, errant
      View synonyms
    • 2Mistaken or defective.

      ‘he suspected that his calculator was at fault’
      • ‘It is not the mechanism of A-levels which is at fault but, rather, the conscious decision to change the way they are marked.’
      • ‘If one pedal felt right and the other wrong then the pedal is probably at fault.’
      • ‘Such behaviour sounds scarcely credible, but I'm sure memory isn't at fault here.’
      • ‘He said there may be a charge, but if it's their equipment at fault there won't be a charge.’
  • find fault

    • Make an adverse criticism or objection, sometimes unfairly or destructively.

      ‘he finds fault with everything I do’
      • ‘He often complained that she never left him alone and found fault with everything he did.’
      • ‘I've no doubt some will, but losers always find fault in every thing and whinge and bawl on almost every thing.’
      • ‘Anyone who found fault with his behaviour or values was ‘middle-class’ or ‘common’.’
      • ‘Nobody can find fault with those who want to protest in public.’
      • ‘Elders often found fault with young people for watching objectionable movies or reading pornographic books.’
      • ‘Certainly envy seeks to spoil it by finding fault and criticising every blemish.’
      • ‘Its hard for a critic not to find fault, kind of removes the point really.’
      • ‘It is all too easy to criticise or find fault in what others do.’
      • ‘She even found fault with the way he performed household chores.’
      • ‘He was never satisfied and found fault with everything.’
  • — to a fault

    • (of someone who displays a particular commendable quality) to an extent verging on excess.

      ‘you're kind, caring and generous to a fault’
      • ‘He can be alternately naïve, guarded, generous to a fault and miserable - perky and jumpy one moment and depressing the next.’
      • ‘At church, he hovered around Ruth like a fly, attentive to a fault.’
      • ‘Unlike most of the places I've been, however, these villagers were more controlled and polite to a fault.’
      • ‘He was generous to a fault: invite him to dinner, and he would come proffering a box of chocolates the size of the coffee-table.’
      • ‘You are loyal to a fault to your friends, merciless to your enemies.’
      • ‘Nevertheless, incumbent officeholders, candidates, and aspirants are pragmatic to a fault, and their main concern is with winning elections.’
      • ‘She was generous to a fault and belonged to a generation of people who never counted the cost of community involvement but gave themselves wholeheartedly to the overall good.’
      • ‘When I was in high school, my honors English teacher once said to me that my writing was ‘concise to a fault.’’
      • ‘She's beautiful, intelligent, strong, generous to a fault, kind, and the list goes on.’
      • ‘For all that, he could be very charming - he told great stories, had a voracious appetite for arts and culture, and was often generous to a fault.’
      excessively, unduly, immoderately, overly, in the extreme, out of all proportion, overmuch, needlessly
      over the top, ott
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English faut(e) lack, failing, from Old French, based on Latin fallere deceive The -l- was added (in French and English) in the 15th century to conform with the Latin word, but did not become standard in English until the 17th century, remaining silent in pronunciation until well into the 18th.

Pronunciation:

fault

/fôlt/