Definition of fanfare in English:



  • 1A short ceremonial tune or flourish played on brass instruments, typically to introduce something or someone important.

    • ‘Arthur Bliss, whose music I'd like to know more of, is represented by two spectacular ceremonial fanfares, which he wrote as Master of the Queen's Musick for the wedding of Princess Margaret.’
    • ‘All at once, Wormhole Square resounded with a fanfare of trumpets as heralds announced the arrival of a notable procession.’
    • ‘The festive mood is set by the fanfare of trumpets and bells in the arrangement by London's Roger Harvey.’
    • ‘Brass fanfares in the manner of Janácek's Sinfonietta mark the ‘Dance of Brutality’.’
    • ‘The president of the bullfight signals for the first bull to be released whereupon the fanfare of trumpets from the brass band also ends the paso doble (popular two beat dance music).’
    • ‘First came the fanfare of pipe bands, brass bands and tenors.’
    • ‘Brass fanfares and skirling strings back Ashcroft's voice.’
    • ‘Then, there was an important-sounding fanfare, and a mellifluous announcer introduced the first Guest of Honour talk.’
    • ‘A fanfare of trumpets announced the arrival of the king and everyone stood.’
    • ‘On the glass panel of the telephone box a lithe figure of ambiguous gender was blowing a trumpet fanfare to celebrate his arrival.’
    • ‘The opening movement combines a brass fanfare with a Widorian toccata figure for its music argument.’
    • ‘Boldly modern trumpet fanfares (à la Shostakovich's First Piano Concerto) resound in the ‘Dance of Poison’.’
    • ‘It builds to a furious pace with something like a brass fanfare at one point.’
    • ‘Through a chromatic mist of string ostinatos, a plainsong chorale gradually emerges in the brass climaxing in resplendent fanfares, before fading away into a haze of sound as the procession recedes.’
    • ‘This is a set of twenty-nine short pieces, most truly titled ‘Trumpet Tunes,’ but also ‘trumpet’ voluntaries, fanfares and processions.’
    • ‘The first movement opens with a striking fanfare, and fanfares return in the otherwise peaceful finale, and overall, the mood is heroic, but without militarism or Soviet bombast.’
    • ‘Originally improvised (as distinct from military signals), fanfares are used for ceremonial purposes, for example to announce the entrance of a dignitary, and are characterized by reliance on the harmonic series.’
    • ‘In the spirit of Shostakovich's last symphony, Vainberg quotes trumpet fanfares from well-known works by Rimsky-Korsakov, Bizet, and Mendelssohn.’
    • ‘Trumpets of various types were used in organized armies from Ancient Egypt onwards, to give signals in camp or battle and to sound fanfares on ceremonial occasions.’
    • ‘From the opening brass fanfares to the insouciance of the finale, the piece evokes images of mounted guardsmen, band shells in Bath, kids with pennywhistles, and even the elegiac promptings of night.’
    peal of trumpets, flourish, fanfaronade, trumpet call, trumpet blare
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    1. 1.1Media attention or elaborate ceremony.
      ‘he turned 25 on Saturday with little fanfare’
      • ‘Some of the biggest names in Bollywood showed up to shower their blessings on as they celebrated their sangeet ceremony with great fanfare.’
      • ‘In Judaism the most heroic acts were done in private, with no fanfare, publicity or showiness - qualities that represent the essence of modesty.’
      • ‘Wellingtonians just get on with things, without fuss or fanfare.’
      • ‘ABOUT FIVE YEARS AGO the University of Adelaide circulated the university's new strategic plan with much fanfare and hype.’
      • ‘WITHOUT MUCH fanfare, the Malayalam film industry is slowly returning to the world of arc lights amidst no signs of an end to the ongoing crisis involving trade bodies and artistes.’
      fuss, commotion, stir, show, showiness, display, ostentation, flashiness, publicity, sensationalism, pageantry, splendour, hubbub, brouhaha
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Mid 18th century: from French, ultimately of imitative origin.