Definition of fall in (or into) line in US English:

fall in (or into) line

phrase

  • Conform with others or with accepted behavior.

    • ‘Disregarding the illogic of objecting to so-called evil only one day of the week, the town council fell in line and residents were encouraged to neither trick nor treat.’
    • ‘The news media both turned a contemptuous eye on war protestors and fell in line with the government's official war policy.’
    • ‘While Britain adopted the Gregorian calendar in 1752 and most of Shetland fell in line in the late 19th century, Foula remains the only part of western Europe to stick to what was called the ‘old ways’.’
    • ‘People were frightened and then, McCarthy was blackballing all of these writers with the liberal views and soon, they all fell in line.’
    • ‘GAA clubs too could be facilitated if their requirements fell into line with the club programme.’
    • ‘American pressure is being sharply felt in Mexico, which is not an Opec member but traditionally falls into line with the organisation's decisions.’
    • ‘‘It's not a case of one person's the boss and everyone else falls into line, as Ernie Nicholls would have it,’ says Mr Duell.’
    • ‘Even his language on posters fell into line with the exhortative tone on Soviet posters when they urged, ‘Let us all fulfill the plan of the great projects.’’
    • ‘Since she fell into line with Howard on the issue of asylum seekers, many in the Left have deserted the party in its hour of need.’
    • ‘This is to make sure results from the UK falls into line with results from the rest of Europe, where voting is traditionally carried out on a Sunday.’
    • ‘The establishment of Ash Schools in Lebanon falls in line with the attempts of the Sunni community to offer Islamic religion to students.’
    • ‘They all fell in line with the view that this incident was a horrendous event and that Bowen had to be severely punished.’
    • ‘The results fell in line almost exactly with Paula's comments.’
    • ‘Mortgage holders are expected to benefit when the bank falls into line with other banks by cutting interest rates ahead of group profit figures due on Thursday.’
    • ‘In this, it appears that my local school district's program to shore up the character of our children falls in line with the lesson plans of the editorial page of The Wall Street Journal.’
    • ‘This decision today, which is remarkable, first, because three of the judges who delayed the election fell in line with eight of their colleagues on the 9th Circuit and said, no delay.’
    • ‘In spite of record construction levels, there was still no sign that the Irish market would fall victim to oversupply, but price inflation would tail off sharply when supply and demand finally fell into line, he added.’
    • ‘The U.S. government fell in line with that approach.’
    • ‘The media, unsurprisingly, gave the whole show a free ride and the arts community fell into line.’
    • ‘So spooked were they that rather than offer a viable alternative, they meekly fell in line with a hideous policy prescription, a decision that continues to haunt them.’