Main definitions of express in English

: express1express2express3

express1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Convey (a thought or feeling) in words or by gestures and conduct.

    ‘he expressed complete satisfaction’
    • ‘Still, I continue to hear from people who express their gratitude for my work here.’
    • ‘Disappointment was expressed at the meeting about the poor response to the branches survey from the young people.’
    • ‘One common perception expressed by the workshop participants is that many people resist new approaches or ideas.’
    • ‘Children have to be taught that when they are angry, or just want something, they should not bite, kick, or hit, but rather express their feelings through words.’
    • ‘Respondents expressed dissatisfaction with public services from schools to transit.’
    • ‘I am trying to find the right words that would express my feelings in an intelligent, courteous manner.’
    • ‘I share the disappointment expressed by other members.’
    • ‘And there's hundreds of other people who've also expressed their condolences.’
    • ‘The remaining 32 participants expressed varying degrees of negative feelings about how society views them.’
    • ‘The committee members also expressed their appreciation of the work carried out by the staff in St. Finan's.’
    • ‘Action and feeling are expressed through gesture and movement, the meaning of which is usually very clear.’
    • ‘Again, I do not have the words to understand nor express the feelings and emotions you have endured since this began.’
    • ‘Things were not uncomplicated and she could not freely express what she felt for her Prince.’
    • ‘I am very sorry to see that using words to express thoughts should be considered criminal.’
    • ‘As both a teacher and parent I concur with the sentiments expressed in the article concerning school exams.’
    • ‘"We live in a free society where we can openly express our opinions," Owens said.’
    • ‘Be sympathetic and ready to listen - when your child's upset, explain to him how to express negative feelings using words.’
    • ‘I remember being so frustrated at not having the words to express my feeling of loss.’
    • ‘Ministers and officials have privately expressed the view that a bird flu pandemic poses a greater threat than terrorism.’
    • ‘I have only 600 words with which to express my thoughts and feelings about Lady Sofia, as I like to call the capital city, and Bulgaria in general.’
    communicate, convey, indicate, show, demonstrate, reveal, intimate, manifest, make manifest, exhibit, evidence, put across, put over, get across, get over
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Say what one thinks or means.
      ‘with a diplomatic smile, she expressed herself more subtly’
      • ‘They were all over the television innumerable times and they were expressing themselves and revealing some of their policies and more of their personalities.’
      • ‘The critical point to recognize here is that elections provide the people a means of expressing themselves.’
      • ‘‘I like it,’ she says, ‘because it's another way of expressing yourself.’’
      • ‘He was the first person to teach me that expressing yourself through writing, music, painting or acting was something to be treasured.’
      • ‘They helped each other both as crew and in class discussions as they brainstormed their ideas and talked about techniques for expressing themselves.’
      • ‘The antagonists to this week's convention are expressing themselves outside of the official proceedings.’
      • ‘We only want to support artists in expressing themselves.’
      • ‘You are good at working and interacting with people, expressing yourself creatively in any situation and a wizard at buying, selling or trading.’
      • ‘Getting where they're coming from will probably deflate your anger, so you'll have a better chance of expressing yourself in a way that lets them truly hear you.’
      • ‘Even though there are tons of skaters from all over the world it's really about individually expressing yourself.’
      • ‘It's all about music in the end, a way of expressing yourself, which we humans have been doing for thousands of years.’
      • ‘Like e-mail, it is dividing the world into two unequal classes: people who feel comfortable expressing themselves through the written word and people who don't.’
      • ‘Students found others ways of expressing themselves.’
      • ‘In the end, if you're writing, you're expressing yourself, and you're helping other people to express themselves by your example.’
      • ‘Join a debate club or summer theater so you can get comfortable expressing yourself.’
      • ‘The festival celebrates creativity in older age and aims to get older people involved through arts and active participation in expressing themselves through the arts.’
      • ‘Kids at one Connecticut school don't like a new rule, but you probably won't hear them expressing themselves by using profanity: the rule to keep kids from cussing.’
      • ‘Letters are great for expressing yourself in bad times, as you don't have to talk to people directly but you can still say what you want and get your message across!’
      • ‘You're just expressing yourself as best and as well as you can.’
      • ‘The genuine best thing is that reading expands your mind, introduces you to new words and new ways of expressing yourself and it actively engages your imagination.’
    2. 1.2Mathematics
      Represent (a number, relation, or property) by a figure, symbol, or formula.
      ‘constants can be expressed in terms of the Fourier transform’
      • ‘Do you know how to express a number as the product of its prime factors?’
      • ‘If we can express a square number also as the sum of two other square numbers then Pythagoras' Theorem tells us that we have three sides of a right-angled triangle.’
      • ‘Johnson viewed probability as expressing logical relations between evidence propositions and hypothesis propositions.’
      • ‘On 4 November 1833 Hamilton read a paper to the Royal Irish Academy expressing complex numbers as algebraic couples, or ordered pairs of real numbers.’
      • ‘He stated, without proof, that it would take the sum of at most nine cubes or 19 fourth powers to express any whole number.’
    3. 1.3Genetics
      Cause (an inherited characteristic or gene) to appear in a phenotype.
      • ‘However, the same gene is sometimes differentially expressed in seemingly equivalent cells.’
      • ‘Scientists are working at adding value to crops by inserting genes which will express a particular trait under controlled conditions.’
      • ‘The genes are expressed in a variety of tissues including the intestine, the hypodermis, the head, and the vulva.’
      • ‘The phenotypes of cells expressing alleles that lacked all or most of the amino terminus were indistinguishable from those of rrm3 cells.’
      • ‘This can be achieved by a reverse genetics approach, by expressing the gene in sense or antisense orientation.’
      • ‘Most retroviral env genes are expressed from a spliced, subgenomic transcript.’
  • 2Squeeze out (liquid or air)

    • ‘It was an old-fashioned mill for grinding linseed, expressing the oil, and making oil-cake.’
    • ‘Often a woman returning to work and wishing to breast feed her baby has no place where she can sit and express her milk.’
    • ‘It will also help to express milk to keep your breast well-drained.’
    • ‘A workingwoman may want to express her milk and ask the caretaker to feed it to the child, but those looking after the baby do not seem to agree with this concept.’
    • ‘Some new mothers think that expressing milk is an arduous task.’
    • ‘I still need to express milk every 2-3 hours as the hungry Wolf is still not latching.’
    • ‘Bake the fresh garlic in a medium oven, baste with olive oil, put some fresh thyme underneath and after one hour express the squidgy contents on to fresh rolls.’
    • ‘It's like squeezing a cow's teat to express milk.’
    • ‘The bank has designated rooms for mothers to express milk, and offers up to 20 days per year emergency childcare at a nearby nursery.’
    • ‘I am forced to express a bit of milk and take Nurofen for the pain.’
    squeeze out, press out, wring out, force out, extract, expel
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (also in the sense press out, obtain by squeezing or wringing used figuratively to mean extort): from Old French expresser, based on Latin ex- out + pressare to press.

Pronunciation:

express

/ikˈspres/

Main definitions of express in English

: express1express2express3

express2

adjective

  • 1Operating at high speed, in particular.

    • ‘TNT's express and logistics operations will be at the forefront of the development.’
    • ‘In July, I sent a package via express mail to India.’
    • ‘When payments had been made, the dealers sent the orders to the buyers in Taiwan by prompt or express delivery.’
    • ‘Anyone fancy starting a cheap express bus service to Manchester?’
    • ‘For more information on the Passport express service, call during business hours.’
    • ‘The company is like the panicky old woman wondering how she lost a penny in her purse while giving exact change in the express line at the grocery store.’
    • ‘Apart from operating cargo and express flights, the company also operates chartered flights.’
    • ‘According to the company, it has a seven per cent share of the premium express delivery market in Britain.’
    • ‘For example, they may think sending a couple of orders every day by overnight express delivery only costs a few bucks.’
    • ‘After a successful test-run, similar express auto services will soon be attached to some of the company's to-be-opened gas stations along the highway, Chan added.’
    • ‘Generally, sellers specify the cost of shipping the item and give buyers the option of express delivery for an additional fee.’
    • ‘The tailgate can be operated one of three ways - the express button on the dash, a key in the tailgate or by a button on the key fob.’
    • ‘We suggest you promptly telephone home and get the wife to dispatch your spare set by express overseas delivery.’
    • ‘There is an extensive air, train and bus network across Korea, and express bus services from Incheon International Airport to most of the cities hosting World Cup football.’
    • ‘At this time, the postal express service was also established to circumvent theft.’
    • ‘Add $20 for regular shipping and handling or $35 for express delivery.’
    • ‘There are no roads and it can only be reached by light aircraft or a two-hour express boat ride from the nearest large town.’
    • ‘Others would turn themselves into express bus routes.’
    • ‘And it wouldn't have to be a massive rail system - even a dedicated express bus lane would be fine.’
    • ‘An express ferry service between St Lucia, Martinique, Dominica and Guadalupe could be used as an alternative to local flights.’
    rapid, swift, fast, quick, speedy, high-speed, brisk, flying, prompt, expeditious
    non-stop, direct, uninterrupted, undeviating, unswerving
    nippy
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1(of a train or other vehicle of public transportation) making few intermediate stops and reaching its destination quickly.
      ‘an express train bound for Innsbruck’
      ‘express bus service’
      ‘an express elevator’
      • ‘The express cars were moved by a switcher from the siding southward via the main track, and they were added to the rear of the New York section.’
      • ‘The group now carries more than 950 million passengers a year worldwide on its bus, train, tram, express coach and airport networks.’
      • ‘We were in an express bus that did not stop anywhere after a particular point.’
      • ‘The distinctive blue and yellow 94-seat Megabus vehicles carry almost twice as many passengers as a traditional express coach.’
      • ‘The pair get into the express elevator, and are quickly deposited onto the upper floor of the apartment complex.’
      • ‘The company runs the TransPennine express service from Blackpool North to Scarborough, which stops at Blackburn, Burnley and Accrington.’
      • ‘The obvious sensible solution would be to invest in some express buses.’
      • ‘Why bother when there are already several express buses that run non-stop from downtown to the airport?’
      • ‘An express train to Narita International Airport is now arriving on platform 1.’
      • ‘This would add running time to the route, potentially jeopardizing the number of riders, who might opt to take a faster express bus instead.’
      • ‘The Bangkok authorities have drawn up plans to build trams, to run new express buses, and to extend the elevated train routes.’
      • ‘Nonusers of the HOV lanes also benefit from this project because revenues are used to support the operation of a new express bus service.’
      • ‘She described two kinds of buses: The express bus, which goes straight to the final destination, and the local bus that stops often.’
      • ‘The train consisted of an express car, a combination baggage/passenger car, two coaches, a diner, and three sleeping cars.’
      • ‘They walked to the express elevator that went directly to the dormitory, stopping at another desk with a wall covered with keys.’
      • ‘Now if only we could get the express train to run a little faster.’
      • ‘You would you take an express elevator to a sky lobby and then switch to a local.’
      • ‘In 1872, a pressman for The Providence Journal turned an old express wagon into an eatery, thus creating the first diner.’
      • ‘From Masan, I took the express bus to Seoul and just within five hours I was in the Central Bus Terminal of the impressive capital of modern Korea.’
      • ‘The whole thing cascades from an upraised hand at top: drops and stops like an express elevator.’
    2. 1.2Denoting a service in which letters or packages are delivered by a special service to ensure speed or security.
      ‘an express letter’
      ‘an express airmail service’
      • ‘Donors were supplied with polling information; we mailed certified letters and express mail packages as well as highly personal appeals from Jim and his family.’
      • ‘The cargo operator expects to handle about 160,000 tonnes of express cargo a year.’
      • ‘He also points out that fusion has become all too easy to attempt with the advent of overnight express mail.’
      • ‘This works in the same manner as checking a commercially sent express package.’
      • ‘He had planned to be unloaded with the money and himself concealed in two express delivery boxes, which accomplices would have smuggled out of the airport.’
      • ‘Thinking that I should tell my mother in Tokyo the good news immediately, I decided to send an express delivery letter about the details of my upcoming marriage.’
      • ‘HF asks how much it costs to send an express delivery letter to Europe by private courier, thus avoiding the vagaries of the Thai postal system.’

adverb

  • By express train or delivery service.

    ‘I got my wife to send my gloves express to the hotel’
    • ‘Running express was very nice, as it kept our train lightly patronized.’
    • ‘Every month traders make the trek to Capulalpan to purchase mushrooms, which are flown express to Japan, providing much-needed cash to the community.’
    • ‘By the time we had reached Patchogue, our last stop before running express, our train was packed.’

noun

  • 1An express train or other vehicle of public transportation.

    ‘we embarked for the south of France on an overnight express’
    • ‘You take an express and then you change and you take a local.’
    • ‘One new train will be an express from the border to the financial district.’
    • ‘Travel between Wellington and Auckland was on the 3 pm express and the 7 pm limited.’
    • ‘We made just 3 stops, and than shot down the middle track as an express all the way to Downer's Grove.’
    • ‘An all-stops service to Perth Central takes 23 minutes and a partial express 21 minutes.’
    • ‘He could easily see the man in front of him standing behind the counter at a general store or working as a dispatcher for the local express.’
    • ‘After his last train journey, the 4 hour late express to Glasgow 3 years ago, Alfie had resolved to put his iron horse tribulations behind him.’
    • ‘She was aboard the Thames train from Paddington which was hit by the Great Western express.’
    • ‘On Monday morning, I added the Sacramento-San Jose Amtrak express to my list of trains which I've boarded barely before they left the platform.’
    • ‘The news website has plenty of links and commentary on the death of the maglev express here.’
    • ‘He doesn't actually stand on station platforms making copious notes of numbers emblazoned on the side of the 1820 Clacton express, but he does take photographs of trains.’
    • ‘This wasn't the usual daily chaos of ScotRail, this was an Amtrak express leaving Penn Station.’
    • ‘It is not known how long his car had been on the track, but the express took 39 seconds to get to the point of impact after triggering the barrier further up the line.’
    • ‘A Newcastle-Kings Cross express hit the car and ploughed into a northbound coal train.’
    • ‘The disaster happened after a Land Rover and trailer came off the M62 on to the line and was hit by a Newcastle-King's Cross express which then collided with a northbound goods train.’
    • ‘At regular station stops, since no express was working on weekends, plenty of time was available to get off and explore the sights in the small eastern towns.’
    • ‘The maglev train from Shanghai to Pudong airport is already in service, but it looks like the planned Beijing-Shanghai maglev express is a non-starter.’
    • ‘She brilliantly reshapes his stories of taxi drivers into her own account of young backpackers aboard a Paris-Amsterdam night express.’
    • ‘The goods train which crashed into a 125 mph passenger express in the disaster was running 20 minutes early.’
    • ‘The car was hit by a passenger express which derailed and then collided with a fully-laden coal train.’
    express train, fast train, direct train
    View synonyms
  • 2An overnight or rapid delivery service.

    ‘the books arrived by express’
    • ‘When sending any items of value through the postal system certified methods are available for that purpose, and special express can also be utilised.’
    • ‘Two days later the Bulstat card was supposedly winging its way by British Post express registered to my assistant in Sofia, delivery in three days guaranteed.’
    • ‘Rather than sending a sample through overnight express, he can use web conferencing.’
    • ‘Air express and air cargo services from Indonesia to other countries and vice versa are still dominated by foreign companies.’
  • 3An express rifle.

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Send by express delivery or messenger.

    ‘I expressed my clothes to my destination’

Origin

Early 18th century (in the sense of the verb): extension of express; express from express train, so named because it served a particular destination without intermediate stops, reflecting an earlier sense of express done or made for a special purpose later interpreted in the sense rapid Senses relating to express delivery date from the institution of this postal service in Britain in 1891.

Pronunciation:

express

/ikˈspres/

Main definitions of express in English

: express1express2express3

express3

adjective

  • 1Definitely stated, not merely implied.

    ‘it was his express wish that the celebration continue’
    • ‘There is no express reference to tort in the subsection.’
    • ‘The entire political elite has become divorced from and hostile to the express wishes of the electorate they are supposed to represent.’
    • ‘Once again, without any democratic discussion, the government is proceeding against the express wishes of the British people by resort to lies and evasions.’
    • ‘Issues will be presented in this column only with the express permission of the member.’
    • ‘That authority may be either actual or apparent, and it may be express, implied, usual or ostensible.’
    • ‘When the President acts pursuant to an express or implied authorization of Congress, his authority is at its maximum.’
    • ‘The bill does not contain an express provision regulating the prescription of medical devices.’
    • ‘One general guideline is not to work spells for anyone without their express consent.’
    • ‘My counter complaint is that my right to privacy was violated when these women looked at my computer screen without my express or implied permission.’
    • ‘This includes touching or entering any unattended vehicle without the express permission of the owner.’
    • ‘They negotiated a cease-fire unknown to officials and against the express wishes of the civilian neocons in charge of the Pentagon.’
    • ‘All that the oral evidence of the witness did was to confirm what was express or implied in her written statement.’
    • ‘Breach of express or implied warranty is a theory in contract law.’
    • ‘The text may reveal the intention either by implication or by express declaration.’
    • ‘The rules apply to powers to accumulate whether they are express or implied.’
    • ‘At Paragraph 17-003 of the book, it is stated that a bare licence may be express or implied.’
    • ‘There is an express, an explicit, authorisation for another member, with the consent of the member lodging the question to do that on his or her behalf.’
    • ‘Thus the Letter contained no express reference to the River Moorings.’
    • ‘This order can also be justified by the patient's express wish that resuscitation not be attempted.’
    • ‘There are so many that one of the gallery's express wishes behind mounting the exhibition takes on a secondary importance.’
    • ‘Herman had then let them off for the rest of the day with express wishes to see Cecil again the next day.’
    • ‘So people may have given you express consent by subscribing to something or requesting something.’
    • ‘They can't be convicted contrary to an express constitutional provision.’
    • ‘I accept, I should say, that it is possible for the terms of a policy by express language to be clearer than this term as to what its intended effect should be.’
    explicit, clear, direct, plain, distinct, unambiguous, unequivocal, unmistakable, obvious
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Precisely and specifically identified to the exclusion of anything else.
      ‘the schools were founded for the express purpose of teaching deaf children’
      • ‘Everybody was requested not to remind these children of their traumatic experience, since they were brought here with the express purpose of helping them forget the bitter experience.’
      • ‘But with podcasting you're talking to yourself for the express purpose of being heard.’
      • ‘It clearly doesn't exist for the express purpose of advancing equality, humanity and other good stuff which end with ‘ity’.’
      • ‘The defences of qualified privilege and comment will only be defeated when a plaintiff demonstrates that the defendant was motivated by express malice.’
      • ‘Everyone participating in the project shares the same express purpose - to improve the quality of the software.’
      • ‘Earlier in the evening they had gone out with the express purpose of attacking people in that park.’
      • ‘I had arrived at the zoo ten minutes before they opened the gate with the express purpose of hiking back into this real collection of exhibits of native animals.’
      • ‘These results will be collated with the express purpose of finding any of these animals.’
      • ‘People arrived just before Jenson arrived, with the express purpose of seeing him.’
      • ‘And yet the Assistant Recorder made no express finding that Mr. and Mrs. Davey were not to be accepted as witnesses of truth nor that Mr. and Mrs. Williams were to be so accepted.’
      • ‘These groups, formed with the express purpose of collecting ‘donations’ for temple festivals, are permanent fixtures in the neighbourhood.’
      • ‘It's the same story in Europe, where a new game called Camelot was created with the express purpose of bad odds leading to big jackpots.’
      • ‘This is a recently formed coalition set up with the express purpose of opposing the president's re-nomination for a fifth term.’
      • ‘By a marathon effort, they haul themselves out of bed and drag themselves to the park for the express purpose of meeting their girlfriend.’
      • ‘Bungee jumping is where you tie yourself to a rope and throw yourself off a high bridge, for the express purpose of turning your stomach inside out when you come to a sudden stop.’
      • ‘They made her in this image for the express purpose of charming the world.’
      • ‘The 9th amendment was added to the bill of rights for the express purpose of insuring that this would not happen.’
      • ‘The express purpose for which it was allocated by the international authorities was to provide full national coverage as well as extending the service to our emigrants and fishermen at sea.’
      • ‘One of them was half full of well preserved tissue paper that has been kept for the express purpose of wrapping all of the breakables when we move.’
      • ‘I tried to put more information to him with the express purpose of repeating in full the information we intended to publish.’
    2. 1.2archaic (of a likeness) exact.

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French expres, from Latin expressus distinctly presented past participle of exprimere press out, express from ex- out + primere press.

Pronunciation:

express

/ikˈspres/