Definition of expel in English:



  • 1 Deprive (someone) of membership of or involvement in a school or other organization.

    ‘she was expelled from school’
    • ‘He was expelled from school for punching a teacher.’
    • ‘The party itself was forced to expel three members and sanction one other.’
    • ‘No one is opposed to such politicians being expelled from the political scene.’
    • ‘When the Nazis occupied his country, he was expelled from school and put to work as a construction labourer.’
    • ‘There were even reports of college students being expelled from school for addiction to computer games.’
    • ‘On a unanimous vote on all of these charges, he was expelled from the party.’
    • ‘UEFA's disciplinary body could have expelled the Italian club from European competition next season.’
    • ‘After being convicted by the jury she was put on a residential drug treatment and testing order but that failed when she was expelled from the hostel.’
    • ‘He was expelled from a city school in second year and was heading straight for jail.’
    • ‘She was also expelled from school, after teachers said she would be a ‘bad influence’ on the other girls.’
    • ‘She was expelled from the party for opposing neo-liberalism and is one of the founders of a new socialist party in her country.’
    • ‘When he was finally expelled from office, the people were so outraged by his excess that he and his wife were literally stoned to death.’
    • ‘Most non-government schools have much wider powers to select or expel students, and select and dismiss teachers and other staff, than government schools.’
    • ‘It is a thread of troublemaking that has followed him ever since he was expelled from school in California for lighting a firework in class.’
    • ‘The allegations resulting in the perjury trial forced him to quit the candidacy, and he was subsequently expelled from the party for five years.’
    • ‘He was expelled from the Conservative Party yesterday morning.’
    • ‘He became involved in the underground Croatian nationalist movement, for which he was expelled from party and office in 1967.’
    • ‘She had been officially expelled from the clan, and her clan markings scoured clean with caustic substances.’
    • ‘Persons are not expelled from universities for attending non-violent demonstrations.’
    • ‘He found a job doing data entry, but was fired when his boss found out he was expelled from university.’
    • ‘Fourteen candidates were expelled from the examination venue on the charge of indulging in malpractices.’
    • ‘At one point I was nearly expelled from school for having a bad influence.’
    • ‘At 15, he was expelled from school after being accused of selling cannabis - a claim he denies.’
    • ‘You are incredibly lucky that the headmaster hasn't expelled you, and brought criminal charges against you.’
    throw out, bar, ban, debar, drum out, thrust out, push out, turn out, oust, remove, get rid of
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    1. 1.1Force (someone) to leave a place, especially a country.
      • ‘Long a supporter of the Sudeten Germans, his wife's own family was expelled from Czechoslovakia in 1945.’
      • ‘Eventually the king was forced to expel her from the country.’
      • ‘Russian forces expelled the older scientists and held the younger ones as prisoners of war.’
      • ‘A Mexican force soon expelled him, and his rangers burned the town of as they left.’
      • ‘This champion of samurai who would overthrow the Shogunate and expel the barbarians became the devoted follower of the elite shogunal official.’
      • ‘When one family member is expelled, the entire family goes into exile.’
      • ‘I haven't had any news of her since I was expelled from Australia.’
      • ‘The country has expelled five diplomats following scrutiny of their activities.’
      • ‘If there is one thing we could do to give this, and other cities, a sensible future, it would be to banish, expel, deport, and forever exile this noxious device and all its associated poisons.’
      • ‘That means the possibility of using the threat of force to force them to give up their weapons and expel the radical organization.’
      • ‘Some 800,000 people were expelled and several hundreds of thousands internally displaced.’
      • ‘Security forces had allied with extreme loyalists to expel families from their homes.’
      • ‘He has been based here since he was expelled from Sudan, and forbidden entry to his homeland of Saudi Arabia.’
      • ‘The one-time Libyan envoy to London, he was expelled from Britain in 1980 for publicly threatening to murder dissidents.’
      • ‘He and three other newspeople were expelled from Baghdad last week.’
      • ‘After he won the presidency in 1990, the opposition joined with the Army to overthrow him and expel him from the country.’
      • ‘The organisation has expelled three members following an internal investigation over their role in the killing and cover-up.’
      • ‘Only last month the south Asian neighbours expelled each other's diplomats over accusations of spying.’
      • ‘He would like to deport and expel people who are French, people who would otherwise vote in elections.’
      • ‘But he was then expelled from the country instead of being taken to a Portuguese prison to begin his sentence.’
      banish, exile, deport, evict, expatriate, dismiss, displace
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    2. 1.2Force out or eject (something), especially from the body.
      ‘she expelled a shuddering breath’
      • ‘After birth, the body expels the fluid and salt, and their blood pressure drops.’
      • ‘Acute diarrhea is an important defense mechanism that enables your body to expel foreign bacteria and parasites quickly.’
      • ‘That my body wants to expel the dust of the past as quickly as it inhales it seems to me an entirely healthy mechanism.’
      • ‘The chair's legs squeaked against the floor as she pushed it away and coughed, her body expelling the pill across to the far side of the table.’
      • ‘A sponge filters out microscopic food by drawing water through tiny spores in its body wall and then expelling it through its top opening.’
      • ‘Unless they are expelled from your body, they add to your weight.’
      • ‘As with a foreign object, sometimes the body rejects a body piercing and expels it or causes it to migrate.’
      • ‘A thrust compressing the abdomen just below the diaphragm forces air up from the lungs through the throat - expelling a foreign body from the choking victim.’
      • ‘So, once his races are over, his main priority will be to expel them from his body as fast and efficiently as possible.’
      • ‘Small but prolonged rises in sea temperature force coral colonies to expel their symbiotic, food-producing algae, a process known as bleaching.’
      • ‘Straightening, she took a deep breath before expelling it sharply.’
      • ‘Pamela took a deep breath, expelled it slowly, puffing her cheeks out.’
      • ‘You know how wretched it is to eat something you shouldn't have and spend the next day and a half miserably expelling it from your body.’
      • ‘Viruses in your throat or chest also stimulate your cough reflex, which helps your body expel the mucus and the virus, he says.’
      • ‘Like peppermint, it helps your body expel gas, but it also stimulates your digestive juices.’
      • ‘The immune system does this work, targeting and breaking down outworn or foreign materials and expelling them from the body.’
      • ‘Yoga helps your body reabsorb and expel gas by stimulating peristalsis, the muscle contractions that eliminate waste.’
      • ‘We could not breathe, either, for our lungs were much too busy expelling laughter from our bodies.’
      • ‘When you take in those extra salts, your body will need to expel them as quickly as possible.’
      • ‘It turns out that some species of penguin can expel their feces with such force that it can fly 40 cm.’
      let out, discharge, eject, force out, issue, send forth
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Late Middle English (in the general sense eject, force to leave): from Latin expellere, from ex- out + pellere to drive.