Definition of expansion in English:

expansion

noun

  • 1The action of becoming larger or more extensive.

    ‘the rapid expansion of suburban Washington’
    ‘a small expansion of industry’
    • ‘These years are post-integration and are from a period of rapid expansion of the industry.’
    • ‘There is accumulating medical evidence in the journals on the rapid expansion of the HIV infection.’
    • ‘It is also set to embark on a major European expansion programme.’
    • ‘Now he runs Scotland's only electronic property search company which is set to enter a period of rapid growth and expansion.’
    • ‘This money would then cut its debt and provide extensive funds for expansion.’
    • ‘The numbers could indicate that economic expansion is finally leading to major jobs growth.’
    • ‘Founders sometimes become arrogant and go on a rapid and unwarranted expansion binge, he warns.’
    • ‘Schipol airport in Amsterdam and Paris Charles de Gaulle have both seen recent expansion programmes.’
    • ‘During the recent boom, the recruitment industry experienced rapid expansion.’
    • ‘It will greatly boost the prospects for economic growth and expansion in towns and villages throughout the county.’
    • ‘Judicial creativity has been most obviously and constructively expressed in the rapid expansion of the law of judicial review.’
    • ‘Between 1890 and 1920 new developments enabled the further expansion of the wheat industry.’
    • ‘In the post-school environment the rapid expansion of industry training continues.’
    • ‘Much of the rest of the country is paying the price of rapid economic expansion.’
    • ‘At the same time close links with the USA resulted in rapid economic recovery and expansion.’
    • ‘And it signals the end of the era of rapid expansion of public spending on essential services funded by tax rises.’
    • ‘The software industry's expansion plans have triggered a real estate boom in the city.’
    • ‘The rapid expansion of the sector observed during the last year emphasises the importance of its advantages.’
    • ‘The energy company was often credited with putting new technologies to work in the service of its rapid expansion.’
    • ‘The market hall is to receive a new look in an 18-month expansion programme.’
    growth, increase in size, enlargement, extension, augmentation, development, evolution
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Extension of a state's territory by encroaching on that of other nations, pursued as a political strategy.
      ‘German expansion in the 1930s’
      • ‘They point out that the single market and European Union expansion are not being built on a strong social platform.’
      • ‘With European Union expansion, this means building commercial and political links with the new Europeans.’
      • ‘We had no intention of conducting an aggressive policy of expansion.’
      • ‘The recent eastward expansion of the European Union has only compounded the social crisis.’
      • ‘This was also the start of the period of colonialist expansion by Spain's Catholic monarchy.’
      • ‘All these problems are exacerbated by the expansion of the European Union to the East.’
      • ‘We are currently laying plans for the establishment and territorial expansion of our nation.’
      • ‘The time was ripe, as the Mexican War had opened a vast area of Western territory for expansion.’
      • ‘It was also a period of expansion, as the nation increased its territory in the west and north.’
      • ‘It adopted a defensive strategy, recognizing that expansion of territory is costly in men and material.’
      • ‘What is the objective of this policy of expansion in the occupied territories?’
      • ‘The Eastern expansion of NATO is another disputed issue between Europe and the United States.’
      • ‘Political instability and danger for the further expansion of the European Union are threatened.’
      • ‘It would not allow them continue their expansion into Palestinian territories.’
      • ‘Many even began to speak of this expansion as their nation's ‘Manifest Destiny’.’
      • ‘They observed that the strategy for Albanian expansion in Macedonia was identical to the one seen in Kosovo.’
    2. 1.2 A thing formed by the enlargement, broadening, or development of something.
      ‘the book is an expansion of a lecture given last year’
      • ‘Although additions and expansions have been made to suit its occupants, the Bishop's House at Fort Kochi can instantly take you on a nostalgic ride.’
      • ‘Despite the grim financial climate, several smaller theaters find themselves planning expansions.’
      • ‘He says that while their intentions are humble for now they, like other companies, leave ample room for future add-ons and expansions.’
      • ‘There will also be expansions to the kitchen and dining areas to accommodate the additional residents.’
      • ‘The club is currently planning several expansions to accommodate golfers who seek pleasure and leisure in a quiet place.’
      • ‘In a sense, this is an expansion of that book to cover the whole region.’
      • ‘It leaves open the possibility of limited expansions of two lodges in the mountain region.’
      • ‘It might mean that the proposed expansions are built later rather than sooner, but at least our representatives will have been diligent.’
      • ‘The development project is part of the Campaign Waterloo initiative, which also is funding the expansions.’
      • ‘‘I think the ballparks are smaller, the players are stronger, and we've had two expansions in the last decade,’ said Selig.’
      • ‘Athletics is moving ahead with expansions to Columbia Icefields recreation facility.’
      • ‘There might be expansions in the family - a baby or an older relative.’
      • ‘Their past expansions have never resulted in the demolition of housing for its building or for parking.’
      • ‘The factor that has kept new premises and expansions at bay is the complete lack of uncommitted parking.’
      • ‘No major renovations or expansions are planned for the former Indigo location, she said.’
      • ‘Unlike in the two previous years, when the companies opened new theme parks, there were no major expansions in Orlando in 2000.’
      • ‘The attempt to keep pace with ever increasing museum collections has resulted in a recent spate of building expansions worldwide.’
      • ‘There will be an added fee of $13.80 applied after three of the four expansions are complete and open for student use.’
      • ‘This value signifies that the colony contains 37,800 sectors of cells having tract length expansions.’
      • ‘Proposed expansions to the shopping centre could bring larger stores to the county town.’
      elaboration, enlargement, amplification, development
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3 The increase in the volume of fuel on combustion in the cylinder of an engine, or the piston stroke in which this occurs.
      • ‘If the operating temperature is higher than there is greater heat distortion due to thermal expansion hence increased friction.’

Origin

Early 17th century: from late Latin expansio(n-), from Latin expandere (see expand).

Pronunciation

expansion

/ikˈspanSHən//ɪkˈspænʃən/