Definition of exclusionary rule in English:

exclusionary rule

noun

US
Law
  • A law that prohibits the use of illegally obtained evidence in a criminal trial.

    • ‘The exclusionary rule tells interpreters not to look at extrinsic materials to discover the meaning of texts.’
    • ‘Illustrating this point, the Court has held that the Fourth Amendment exclusionary rule and the Miranda exclusionary rule do not apply to the impeachment of a criminal defendant who testifies.’
    • ‘It is conceded by the defence that whatever was said by the deceased in the presence of the accused does not fall within the hearsay exclusionary rule.’
    • ‘The applicants' claim was rejected since it was found to fall squarely within the scope of the exclusionary rule formulated by the House of Lords in the Hill case.’
    • ‘Precisely what is the legal basis of their alleged exclusionary rule, if we hypothesize that the investigation of Churchill violates the First Amendment?’
    • ‘In 1984 Congress undercut the exclusionary rule which barred evidence obtained in violation of the Fourth Amendment.’
    • ‘As the Prudential principle is an exclusionary rule denying a claimant what would otherwise be his right to sue, the onus must be on the defendants to establish its applicability.’
    • ‘The respondent submitted that breath samples are so unobtrusive and routine that they may be an exception to the exclusionary rule applied to conscriptive evidence.’
    • ‘With approval, Dash tells how and why the Warren Court expanded the law to impose the exclusionary rule on state courts as well.’
    • ‘In another important case, a court held that the Act did not apply to the Navy and declined to apply an exclusionary rule for the violation of a similar internal administrative regulation.’
    • ‘Evidence obtained in violation of the Fourth Amendment is subject to the exclusionary rule, which prevents the use of illegally obtained evidence in criminal trials.’
    • ‘It certainly boosts the credit of the witness, but I do not see it as providing any additional status to warrant its admission in the face of the exclusionary rule.’
    • ‘First, I feel no doubt that the modern climate of judicial and professional opinion favours the relaxation of exclusionary rules of evidence in civil cases whenever it seems safe to do so.’
    • ‘But the result of this loose evidence standard - and lack of an exclusionary rule - is that it also allows the product of torture to be introduced as evidence.’
    • ‘In general, I am sympathetic to the trend in American courts to have much stricter exclusionary rules for expert testimony.’

Pronunciation:

exclusionary rule

/ikˈsklo͞oZHəˌnerē ˌro͞ol/