Definition of exchange rate in English:

exchange rate

(also rate of exchange)

noun

  • The value of one currency for the purpose of conversion to another.

    • ‘The exchange rate is the number of foreign currency per unit of local currency.’
    • ‘Firstly, when looking for your property, budget at a lower exchange rate than the current market rate.’
    • ‘The exchange rate of the local currencies like the franc and the Deutsche Mark in relation to the euro was fixed at that time.’
    • ‘The slope of the budget constraint defines the relative prices, often called the market rate of exchange between X and Y. Its location defines the available resources to spend.’
    • ‘We will have to learn to cope with a fairer exchange rate for the single currency at current levels.’
    • ‘The currency board simply issues notes and coins and offers the service of converting local currency into the anchor currency at a fixed rate of exchange.’
    • ‘This has effectively set an exchange rate for these currencies, and given them a real value.’
    • ‘In both cases, the real wage will not decline and a devaluation of the nominal exchange rate will not be effective.’
    • ‘In the cheaper country the prices of goods or the value of the exchange rate will rise.’
    • ‘The month of March also saw a strengthening in the Euro exchange rate and a drop in white fish prices.’
    • ‘Forward exchange rate markets might be thin and be priced in a non-competitive fashion.’
    • ‘The rate of exchange from euro to U.S. dollars is EUR 1 to approximately 96 cents throughout the 12-nation euro zone.’
    • ‘The amount of the fee is converted from euro into the local currency at the official exchange rate.’
    • ‘It blamed a downturn in sales and the exchange rate between the euro and the US dollar for the closure.’
    • ‘But is it true that the state of the balance of payments determines the currency rate of exchange?’
    • ‘Latvia relies on a strong independent central bank, but shadows its exchange rate to the SDR in a virtual peg.’
    • ‘Prior to the Asian Crisis, Thailand had a pegged exchange rate tied to the dollar.’
    • ‘To put it simply, if in the U.S. the price of 1kg of potatoes is one dollar and in Europe two euros, then according to the purchasing power framework the currency rate of exchange should be one dollar for two euros.’
    • ‘Domestic interest rate policies may also put pressure on capital flows into, and out of, the domestic economy, and will affect the rate of exchange of the domestic currency.’
    • ‘Many are probably wise to the fact credit cards can offer an excellent exchange rate.’

Pronunciation

exchange rate

/ɪksˈtʃeɪndʒreɪt/