Definition of exceed in English:



  • 1 Be greater in number or size than (a quantity, number, or other measurable thing)

    ‘production costs have exceeded $60,000’
    • ‘If you are middle-aged, that figure could exceed nine billion before you die.’
    • ‘As expected he topped the poll comfortably and with 1,002 votes he made it on the first count, well exceeding the quota of 757.’
    • ‘The way to get coal for heating is to exceed the production quota.’
    • ‘The total costs of this matter (so far) must exceed this figure by some margin.’
    • ‘It is expected that with such interest being expressed in the project that the print run will much exceed this figure.’
    • ‘In the most populated areas of California, the cost of living far exceeds the national average.’
    • ‘If beetle counts exceed an average of six beetles per trap per day, this is equal to the treatment threshold.’
    • ‘The number of Catholics worldwide has exceeded one billion for the first time, according to figures released by the Vatican.’
    • ‘The increase meant the producers exceeded their official quotas by 8.7 percent, according to the report.’
    • ‘Duties on quantities exceeding the quotas will be gradually reduced until their full lifting in 2006-2007.’
    • ‘Thus, it was decided to compare average size of faculty with programs whose faculty exceeded the average.’
    • ‘The report shows that Norway also exceeded its quota when trade statistics are used as the measuring parameter.’
    • ‘The OPEC nations habitually cheat on each other by exceeding the production quotas that they agree to.’
    • ‘His actual income probably exceeds this figure, but for lack of evidence, I am not able to make a finding as to the total amount of income.’
    • ‘Although this figure exceeds the averages for tobacco, cotton, and even rice, it falls below the averages of sugar estates in the Caribbean or Brazil.’
    • ‘He was elected on the first count having well exceeded the quota of 465.’
    • ‘Annual costs to the nation in lost productivity and health expenses exceeded sixty billion dollars.’
    • ‘He forecast that if the price of compensatory notes exceeds their par value, more holders would choose to sell and invest the money in real estate.’
    • ‘If this is anywhere near correct, it's an astonishing number, far exceeding the turnout of eligible voters in any recent American Presidential election.’
    • ‘One decade after the dismantling of the USSR and the restoration of capitalism, the death rate of Russia exceeds its birth rate.’
    1. 1.1Go beyond what is allowed or stipulated by (a set limit, especially of one's authority)
      ‘the Tribunal's decision clearly exceeds its powers under the statute’
      • ‘It has told Indian hospitals that it cannot refer UK patients because flying time to India exceeds the three hours limit set for transferring patients.’
      • ‘While most techs are just happy if you don't toss the mic around like Roger Daltry, they're notorious for their futile attempts at keeping bands from exceeding pre-determined stage volume levels.’
      • ‘Two solar powered vehicle activated signs which will detect vehicles exceeding the speed limit and flash up a reminder.’
      • ‘If he finished his campaign now, he would not exceed the $20,000 limit, he said.’
      • ‘As we are now in debt we need to keep a very careful control on cash - we cannot risk exceeding our statutory borrowing limit.’
      • ‘It has little direct value in feed by-products and could result in the feed exceeding the maximum limit on fiber allowed in poultry feed, for example.’
      • ‘They exceed the range limits imposed on Iraqi weapons by the 1991 ceasefire agreement.’
      • ‘Travelling at approximately 8mph, he had exceeded the 2mph speed limit for towns.’
      • ‘Passengers exceeding the carry-on limit will not be allowed through the security checkpoint.’
      • ‘On the other hand, operating expenses will in no way be allowed to exceed the barest minimum requirement.’
      • ‘For this reason, drivers are allowed to exceed the speed limit on such calls.’
      • ‘Ireland's greenhouse gas emissions are far exceeding our Kyoto limits with the agricultural sector as the biggest emitter.’
      • ‘It is within the Prime Minister's powers to exceed the speed limit, if she is on urgent public business.’
      • ‘Why are you allowed to exceed water allocation limits if you can simply afford to pay the surcharge?’
      • ‘If they had done so, they would have gone beyond the necessity of war and exceeded the previously prescribed limits.’
      • ‘The noise levels are monitored, he said, and the range never exceeded the limits allowed in the Noise Pollution Regulations.’
      • ‘The only person who can make a decision to exceed the speed limit is the person in control of the vehicle.’
      • ‘The charges for late payments, returned payments and exceeding one's credit limit have gone up from £20 to £25.’
      • ‘Any current service member who is at or exceeds the 25% limit is prohibited from adding to the tattooed area.’
      • ‘As many as one in eight motorists drinks beer, lager or wine before getting behind the wheel, with many exceeding the legal drink-drive limit, research found.’
      be more than, be greater than, be over, run over, go over, go beyond, overshoot, overreach, pass, top
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    2. 1.2Be better than; surpass.
      ‘catalog sales have exceeded expectations’
      • ‘When the sound mix also exceeds one's expectations based on the film's content, you start to wonder what's going on.’
      • ‘‘Pride and Prejudice is exceeding everyone's expectations and hopefully it will do as well in America when it is released there, as that will really put him on the map,’ said Casey.’
      • ‘This is for the first time in close to a decade that that economic growth has exceeded the 8 per cent mark.’
      • ‘With less than two years left in the initial testing phase, their expectations are being exceeded at almost every level.’
      • ‘It was a success far exceeding anyone's expectations.’
      • ‘The volume of gifts collected to date has far exceeded anyone's expectations.’
      • ‘Walton expects economic growth to exceed the MPC's base case, due to buoyant exports and investment.’
      • ‘Year after year, economic and income growth exceeded prevailing, modest expectations.’
      • ‘Even Barnett, who tends to avoid movie-industry hype, cautiously admits that expectations have been exceeded.’
      • ‘Afterwards, Conradt spoke of her team that had exceeded everybody's expectations except its own.’
      • ‘Marine officials at a post-battle briefing said the speed of the fight exceeded their wildest expectations.’
      • ‘And he enjoyed a level of success which exceeded everybody's expectations even his own!’
      • ‘The charity was overwhelmed by the response to its fund raising events over the festive period, with the final total exceeding its highest expectations.’
      • ‘Jenny reaches and exceeds the highest expectations anyone could have of a teacher of this course.’
      • ‘And in October of the same year, he started writing this book and the book exceeded his wildest expectations.’
      • ‘It includes the kid who never even made it to college and the one who exceeded everyone's expectations.’
      • ‘Like it or not, the rapid growth in Internet use has meant domain name registrations have far exceeded anyone's expectations.’
      • ‘The response from this group has exceeded my highest expectations, but there's still a lot of work to be done.’
      • ‘Having now exceeded her own wildest expectations, she's less inclined to impose limits on other aspects of her life.’
      • ‘He also said the country has a bright economic outlook, with economic growth exceeding 10% for fiscal 1999, which ended March 31.’
      surpass, outdo, outstrip, outshine, outclass, transcend, top, cap, beat, be greater than, be superior to, be better than, go one better than, better, pass, eclipse, overshadow, put in the shade, put to shame
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Late Middle English (in the sense go over a boundary or specified point): from Old French exceder, from Latin excedere, from ex- out + cedere go.