Definition of enunciate in English:

enunciate

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Say or pronounce clearly.

    ‘she enunciated each word slowly’
    • ‘He is finely convincing in his portentous and lengthy narration, which can be wearisome if the words are enunciated less clearly than here.’
    • ‘‘We ask for time extenders,’ a heavily accented voice said slowly over the comms, as if the speaker was enunciating each word carefully.’
    • ‘Also, she speaks rather more slowly, enunciating her words very clearly as if I am finding them difficult to understand.’
    • ‘However, the last word was not enunciated clearly, or so he claimed.’
    • ‘She has a speech impediment and although she could not always clearly enunciate her words, her message was clear.’
    • ‘He raised his hand and pointed a finger at her, directly between the eyes, and spoke, slowly, enunciating every word, moving his finger as he did so.’
    • ‘‘Now where did you get that,’ she said, speaking slowly and enunciating each word.’
    • ‘It is important to enunciate each word clearly and not to run words together.’
    • ‘He sings in a soft voice, carefully enunciating his syllables as if uncertain he'll be understood.’
    • ‘I'm introduced to him at a party and I just gotta lay into him, speaking slowly and enunciating clearly.’
    • ‘‘They gave them to me because,’ and she enunciated the next bit clearly, ‘I am fabulous!’’
    • ‘He enunciated each word carefully, like I was hard of hearing.’
    • ‘She enunciates the last words carefully as she hands Lucas over to her ex-husband.’
    • ‘Taking a deep breath to steady herself, Sammy tried again, this time speaking slowly and trying to enunciate her words carefully.’
    • ‘Patrick spoke to her like she was a child, enunciating every word very carefully.’
    • ‘She led us once again, speaking in the clearly enunciated tones of someone who took her schooling in a different era.’
    • ‘He enunciated each word slowly, his nose practically touching the tip of mine.’
    • ‘‘Let me finish, Alex,’ she spoke, enunciating each word clearly.’
    • ‘‘I'm gonna ask this one more time,’ he says, enunciating every word clearly and forcefully, adding just enough edge to intimidate.’
    • ‘He groaned and repeated what he'd said, carefully enunciating every word.’
    pronounce, articulate
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Express (a proposition or theory) in clear or definite terms.
      ‘a written document enunciating this policy’
      • ‘It assumes that the phenomenon is something that you can put in a lab, measure, quantify, and repeat exhaustively as much as needed in order to elaborate a theory or enunciate a theorem.’
      • ‘There are many principles of war enunciated by many experts.’
      • ‘Her Honour enunciates the master tort theory on the basis that that proposition is to the effect that the employer acquires a liability because of his or its responsibility in the selection of the employee.’
      • ‘This is the context in which the Lord Chief Justice enunciated the principles already quoted.’
      • ‘I was pleased that the bill enunciates the principle that all relevant evidence is admissible unless there is a policy reason to exclude it.’
      • ‘From the outset of our conference I want to enunciate those first principles.’
      • ‘I should have thought that any jury or any person to whom that proposition is enunciated would say, ‘When may that be the case?’’
      • ‘The first rule, set out in the first sentence of the first paragraph, is of a general nature and enunciates the principle of peaceful enjoyment of property.’
      • ‘It would reverse 400 years of physics and take us back before Galileo enunciated the principle that velocity is relative.’
      • ‘He was verbally inarticulate and could not enunciate a clear concept or formulate ideas.’
      • ‘It was in 1746, soon after becoming director of the Berlin Academy, that he first enunciated the Principle of Least Action and it was four years later that he published it in Essai de cosmologie.’
      • ‘‘I was hoping not to have to enunciate principles,’ Costello replies.’
      • ‘This proposition is enunciated in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the implementation of these rights is reduced to treaty form in a series of covenants of various rights subscribed to by most of the nations of the world.’
      • ‘When you enunciate your principles, you are condemned as a hypocrite because your people have failed to live by them.’
      • ‘Thus, counter-examples to the principle enunciated by him do not necessarily refute the argument.’
      • ‘India was one of the first nations in the world to actually enunciate the environment principle in its policies.’
      • ‘I think the key here is to enunciate a principle for offsets.’
      • ‘Although no new principles were enunciated by the Court, the full impact of its radical jurisprudence only really came home to many British parliamentarians with this case.’
      • ‘This skepticism emerged after Arthur Schopenhauer enunciated his theory on truth and meaning, a concept that was immediately approved and enlarged upon by Nietzsche.’
      • ‘In my judgment in so far as the Court of Session interpreted the purpose of the Regulations and enunciated principles of law I am and should be bound by the decision of the Inner House as a first instance judge.’
      express, utter, state, give expression to, give voice to, put into words, give utterance to, declare, profess, set forth, assert, affirm
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Proclaim.
      ‘a prophet enunciating the Lord's wisdom’

Origin

Mid 16th century (as enunciation): from Latin enuntiat- announced clearly from the verb enuntiare, from e- (variant of ex-) out + nuntiare announce (from nuntius messenger).

Pronunciation

enunciate

/əˈnənsēˌāt/