Main definitions of entrain in English

: entrain1entrain2

entrain1

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • Board a train.

    • ‘I'm going to be getting up early tomorrow and entraining for deepest darkest Wales, where I will be spending an extended weekend with family.’
    • ‘We entrained at the camp & came on to Alexandria & thence to the boat.’
    • ‘I did distribute the brochures to about 20 people entraining, detraining, and meeting people at the station that day.’
    • ‘At Paddington, her wedding party entrains in a private saloon for the journey to Shropshire, enjoying ‘the low, rich purr of a Great Western express’ as far as Shrewsbury.’
    • ‘So, on Saturday morning I entrained for Brighton.’
    be in time for, reach in time, make, get to
    View synonyms

Pronunciation:

entrain

/enˈtrān//inˈtrān/

Main definitions of entrain in English

: entrain1entrain2

entrain2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1(of a current or fluid) incorporate and sweep along in its flow.

    • ‘The increased turbulence entrains bedload within the water column and carries it to the mouthbar, where it is deposited.’
    • ‘Researchers have found that it is possible to use the large capillary pressures that are developed by fluids that are entrained within aerogels to produce an efficient pump that requires no moving parts.’
    • ‘Both were occasionally high near the fishway, suggesting that reverse flow might entrain nutrients or phytoplankton.’
    • ‘Volcanic activity is often so violent that it entrains (picks up) pieces of ‘country rock’, which are not of volcanic origin.’
    • ‘So that would have told you at least one of or both contained entrained hydrocarbons?’
    1. 1.1Cause or bring about as a consequence.
      ‘the triumph of a revolution was measured in terms of the social revision it entrained’
      • ‘It entrains more reticent givers and an expanding array of scholarships attracts the attention of students, recruiters, faculty and the envy of competing departments.’
  • 2Biology
    (of a rhythm or something that varies rhythmically) cause (another) gradually to fall into synchronism with it.

    • ‘Furthermore, lung denervated lung transplant patients, unlike intact subjects, showed much difficulty in entraining their spontaneous rhythm to the mechanical ventilator during sleep.’
    • ‘They provided a detailed account of how attentional rhythms are entrained by external rhythms.’
    • ‘One of the characteristics of a circadian oscillator is that the rhythm can be entrained by environmental cues, e.g., changes in ambient light, temperature, and nutrient conditions.’
    • ‘It acts as the body's principal circadian pacemaker, regulating and entraining daily rhythms of physiology and behavior.’
    • ‘He demonstrated that melatonin synchronized and entrained circadian rhythms and developed a multiple-oscillator model of circadian organization that remains viable and important today.’
    1. 2.1[no object]Fall into synchronism with (something) in such a way.
      • ‘Plant cells are uniquely entrained to extracellular and environmental cues that exhibit periodicity such as light, temperature, and water.’
      • ‘Regeneration has been entrained to complete an asexual life cycle in fissiparous and comet-forming starfish.’
      • ‘Music is about blending pitches, entraining to rhythms.’
      • ‘I mean, a TV definitely lets off radiation with a specific frequency, and I know I've read about brainwaves getting entrained to TV frequencies.’
      • ‘There is no need for any symbolic processing to interpret what one hears or so that one can generate a response that is tightly entrained to the actions of one's fellows.’

Origin

Mid 16th century (in the sense bring on as a consequence): from French entraîner, from en- in + traîner to drag.

Pronunciation:

entrain

/enˈtrān//inˈtrān/