Definition of enthrall in US English:

enthrall

(British enthral)

verb

[with object]
  • 1Capture the fascinated attention of.

    ‘she had been so enthralled by the adventure that she had hardly noticed the cold’
    • ‘The story enthrals you from the first page to the last as the plot unravels at a speedy pace.’
    • ‘He could bring his stories to life and enthralled many with his memories from former times.’
    • ‘But the eye is dazzled and enthralled by the super-massive black hole that lives deep within the core of the Milky Way.’
    • ‘There are many stories of caddies that enthral and captivate but one of my favourites concerns the application of suitable nicknames by caddies to their peers.’
    • ‘She practiced religiously, gathered confidence, was enthralled by her new adventure.’
    • ‘The older man would suddenly sit down and begin a story that would enthrall you so completely, you had no knowledge of the passing of time.’
    • ‘Still, she was pretty, and pretty seemed to be enough to enthrall Fabian's attention.’
    • ‘His conceit and awful orange hair will carry on enthralling a worldwide audience.’
    • ‘It's not bad exposition, and it's enthralling in a ‘listening to the stories of an old school friend you've met at the pub’ kind of way.’
    • ‘From language tutorial CDs through rhymes and stories that enthral toddlers to CDs providing information on home improvement and interior design, the show screams assortment.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, a steady stream of tourists question the participants, and are enthralled and delighted at the aims of the march.’
    • ‘Any reader would be enthralled by the story and find themselves rapidly taking it in.’
    • ‘Our first reaction is enthralled delight, but then ominous overtones register.’
    • ‘Our past is something which intrigues, enthrals and captivates us and if for no other reason, history is important because it is interesting to the vast majority of us.’
    • ‘The grand finale brought a beguiled and enthralled audience to their feet for a standing ovation.’
    • ‘On the way here, she had been enthralled, mesmerised, spellbound by the area.’
    • ‘The result is about as enthralling a story as the life of an English professor can reasonably be.’
    • ‘The event promises to enthral the fraternity of adventure freaks, spectators and participants.’
    • ‘He can enthrall you with a story from his past, and knows the ways of the bush the way city people know the way home from work.’
    • ‘I love it when books engross and enthrall you like that.’
    captivate, charm, enchant, bewitch, fascinate, beguile, entrance, enrapture, delight, attract, allure, lure
    fascinating, entrancing, enchanting, bewitching, captivating, charming, beguiling, enrapturing
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    1. 1.1archaic Enslave.
      sell into slavery, condemn to slavery, take away someone's human rights, disenfranchise, condemn to servitude
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘enslave’; formerly also as inthrall): from en-, in- (as an intensifier) + thrall.

Pronunciation