Definition of enter in English:

enter

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Come or go into (a place)

    ‘she entered the kitchen’
    no object ‘the door opened and Karl entered’
    figurative ‘reading the Bible, we enter into an amazing new world of thoughts’
    • ‘It is Shakespeare al fresco and the spectator entering the Globe steps into an environment at once familiar and mysterious, past and present.’
    • ‘For instance, when you tell a story, you may have a character who enters, speaks his lines and then exits.’
    • ‘To enter the City of Manchester stadium, visitors need to buy a swipe card.’
    • ‘Two giant Haida totem poles have long greeted visitors as they enter the Field Museum.’
    • ‘The dreams of the younger players were already losing their sparkle just when they were about to enter a World Cup arena for the first time and should be savouring every moment.’
    • ‘After paying a highly-inflated price for gasoline, I entered the Capital Beltway.’
    • ‘Get your troops over there, but make sure they don't enter the City or they'll be killed on site.’
    • ‘They entered Room 180 through its double doors and found it filling with smoke.’
    • ‘The shooting has sparked fears of a retaliatory attack by the victim's friends, who tried to enter the City Hall on Thursday.’
    • ‘Unusually, all the action takes place on one set which gives it a theatrical feel with characters constantly entering and exiting from the wings.’
    • ‘She shook her head, dismissing all thoughts on that matter, as she entered the Town Square.’
    • ‘We entered the City at the original site of Temple Bar and descended Fleet Street, now a mere shadow of its former journalistic self.’
    • ‘Some might even say we are entering the World of the Weird as this is one different-looking sixgun.’
    • ‘As planned, Buddha enters the City to attend a feast.’
    • ‘To enter into dialogue with a culture that does not possess the ontological security of majority cultures is to enter a representational space of intimacy.’
    • ‘They enter the Centre and are immediately struck by its sense of space and the feeling of being in a cultural retreat, rich and wise.’
    • ‘When entering the Centre on Sunday, she was in a complete daze and nearly cried when she saw the wanton destruction.’
    • ‘This was during the visit of the Lady Nelson, under Captain John Murray, the first European vessel to enter Port Phillip Bay.’
    • ‘In the short run the number and size of freight vehicles entering the City should be reduced through measures to pool deliveries.’
    • ‘I feel butterflies in my belly as I watch William Hutt enter from up stage center greeted by a long round of applause.’
    go in, go into, come in, come into, get in, get into, set foot in, cross the threshold of, pass into, move into, gain access to, be admitted to, effect an entrance into, make an entrance into, break into, burst into, irrupt into, intrude into, invade, infiltrate
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1no object Used as a stage direction to indicate when a character comes on stage.
      ‘enter Hamlet’
      • ‘As they exit from the stage, enter three beautiful women from Ukraine, dressed in vibrant costumes.’
    2. 1.2 Come or be introduced into.
      ‘the thought never entered my head’
    3. 1.3 Penetrate (something)
      ‘the bullet entered his stomach’
      penetrate, pierce, puncture, perforate, make a hole in, make a wound in
      View synonyms
    4. 1.4 (of a man) insert the penis into the vagina of (a woman)
  • 2Begin to be involved in.

    ‘in 1941 America entered the war’
    • ‘In the last surviving section, the betrothed is introduced to and enters her new Byzantine family.’
    • ‘The national interest analysis notes some of the disadvantages to New Zealand in entering a closer economic partnership with Thailand.’
    join, join in, get involved in, go in for, throw oneself into, engage in, embark on, venture into, venture on, launch into, plunge into, undertake, take up
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 Become a member of or start working in (an institution or profession)
      ‘that autumn, he entered college’
      • ‘The condition he has was discovered while he was a teenager and had been treated and noted before he entered Yale.’
      • ‘He did doctoral work on testing and develops writing assessments for entering M.I.T. freshmen.’
      • ‘Following this he became a Schools Inspector, entering at this stage the same profession as that of his father.’
      • ‘Suggest a book for someone considering entering the Catholic Church.’
      join, become a member of, enrol for, enrol in, enlist in, volunteer for, sign up for, take up, become associated with, become connected with, commit oneself to
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2 Register as a competitor or participant in a tournament, race, or examination.
      • ‘Luxembourg have entered the World Cup 15 times and finished bottom of their qualifying group every time.’
      • ‘To top it all off, those of you with a singing voice can enter the Sopranos Karaoke Competition which will begin before the end of the year.’
      • ‘Should you wish to enter the World Handwriting Contest next year, please visit their website.’
      • ‘Nevertheless, success in the Islamic Games' tennis and entering the World Group play-offs are the landmarks of our national tennis.’
      • ‘The club's players also formed the backbone of the North Yorkshire sides that entered the Area Cup for county teams across the UK.’
      • ‘When he entered the World Pizza Games in Las Vegas, he won first place three years running.’
      • ‘He relied on skill and perseverance to win his way and when he first entered senior County level football he was subject to a lot of hard knocks.’
      • ‘England didn't enter the World Cup until 1950, whereupon we were immediately instilled as favourites.’
      • ‘I am working towards entering the City of Glasgow Great Scottish Run on September 8.’
      • ‘In 1995 she entered her first World Games in Manchester, winning two silvers and a bronze.’
      go in for, put one's name down for, register for, enrol for, sign on for, sign up for, become a competitor in, become a contestant in, gain entrance to, obtain entrance to
      View synonyms
    3. 2.3 Start or reach (a stage or period of time) in an activity or situation.
      ‘the election campaign entered its final phase’
      • ‘It is expected to transform every life stage it enters.’
      • ‘He also noted that the party is entering its 20th year in existence on December 21.’
      begin, start, move into, go into, enter on
      View synonyms
    4. 2.4no object (of a particular performer in an ensemble) start or resume playing or singing.
  • 3Write or key (information) in a book, computer, etc., so as to record it.

    ‘children can enter the data into the computer’
    • ‘Users can use it to enter information about themselves on any web site without having to type it in manually every time.’
    • ‘If you think you have forgotten to enter a note for that bar and try to enter one, you will end up with two notes instead of one.’
    • ‘So when you enter your information, it's going to a criminal somewhere in the Internet, who's taking that data and using it for financial crime.’
    • ‘There's been much confusion over the pledging process and I will happily get you registered and enter the amount you stipulate.’
    • ‘He rubbed his eyes as she entered the last of their notes into the datapak on the desk before her.’
    • ‘Unsigned vouchers had been entered in the books of accounts.’
    • ‘New buttons formed, and on the screen it indicated for him to enter how far into the future to move.’
    • ‘Since then all the original material and volumes of fresh material have been carefully researched, assessed and entered onto the computer system.’
    • ‘Secondly, you can deliberately enter information about yourself into a digital profile.’
    • ‘Where phones lose out to palmtops is screen size, the ease with which you can enter information and flexibility in choice of software.’
    • ‘She enters it in the register and hands him his change.’
    • ‘Also entered is information about his or her family and friends.’
    record, write down, set down, put in writing, put down, take down, note, make a note of, jot down, put down on paper, commit to paper
    View synonyms
  • 4Law
    Submit (a statement) in an official capacity, usually in a court of law.

    ‘an attorney entered a plea of guilty on her behalf’
    • ‘He again reiterated that he would not have entered his guilty plea had he known of this additional licence suspension.’
    • ‘During a hearing on Monday, his solicitor entered no plea and made no application for bail.’
    • ‘In nearly all cases, the defendant enters a guilty plea before trial.’
    • ‘She too had been given an indication that upon such pleas being entered, the prosecution would not proceed further against her husband.’
    • ‘She entered a guilty plea without having gone through a preliminary hearing.’
    submit, register, lodge, put on record, record, table, file, put forward, place, advance, lay, present, press, prefer, tender, offer, proffer
    View synonyms

noun

  • A key on a computer keyboard which is used to perform various functions, such as executing a command or selecting options on a menu.

    • ‘Hitting the enter key will take you to a static menu but the extras, except for the commentary track, are not on it.’
    • ‘He pressed a few keys and hit the enter key with some bravado.’
    • ‘She finishes her typing with a drawn-out pressing of the enter key and looks pointedly at her sister.’
    • ‘With the map screen showing, a touch of the enter key clears the surface data from the screen, leaving only aviation information.’
    • ‘She hit the enter key to the shield computer, running the program she had kept quiet about.’
    • ‘The games are rather shallow and require only the use of the four arrow keys and the enter key on your keyboard, or a couple of buttons on your controller.’
    • ‘The various accoutrements that comprise his inventory may be viewed via the middle icon, and activated by pressing the enter key.’
    • ‘The main problems for me personally were the backspace key and the enter key.’
    • ‘This key is used much more than the Delete key and most keyboards use a size almost as large as the enter key.’
    • ‘Pressing the enter key expands the boundaries of the map so that there's a depiction of the entire level, from which you can ascertain the precise locations of all the control points under your team's banner.’
    • ‘Its concerns have to do with paper, the enter key and the space-bar.’
    • ‘He punched the enter key and the first line ceased scrolling.’
    • ‘Using the keyboard on his lap, he typed a few lines and pushed the enter key.’
    • ‘He tapped the enter key and the screen popped up.’
    • ‘She hit the enter key and the algorithm checking his control of environmental air scrubbers began.’
    • ‘With that in mind, be sure to hit the enter key twice before typing your reply after a previous e-mail's contents.’
    • ‘Finally, he pressed the enter key on the last keypad.’
    • ‘When these debates on a posted news article start, ask yourself a question before you hit the enter key.’
    • ‘Another user comes up to me in the coffee room and asks if I can replace the enter key on his laptop.’
    • ‘Finishing the re-reading, he hit the enter key, sending the test off to the instructor's station.’

Phrases

  • enter someone's head (or mind)

    • usually with negative(of a thought or idea) occur to someone.

      ‘such an idea never entered my head’
      • ‘‘My darling,’ said he, ‘I beg of you, for my sake and for our child's sake, as well as for your own, that you will never for one instant let that idea enter your mind!’
      • ‘It does, of course, enter my mind that I am being considered for the tour, but really I have to make sure that I play well for Scotland.’
      • ‘The implication was that in his state such a question would not have entered his mind.’
      • ‘‘It never entered my mind to leave, to be honest,’ he insists.’
      • ‘It was very frustrating, and I would be lying if I said the idea of cutting it all off never entered my mind.’
      • ‘In fact, even when financial circumstances would have allowed him to travel and revisit the place of his birth, it seems that the idea of doing so never entered his mind.’
      • ‘In a match it doesn't even enter his mind, but it's in training that mental demons indulge in unsporting behaviour.’
      • ‘What occurred next had not entered his mind either.’
      • ‘For a good while longer, I was disgusted with myself that the idea even entered my mind.’
      • ‘Once an idea like that entered my mind, there wasn't a reasonable fact you could throw at me that would get me to stop worrying.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • enter into

    • 1Become involved in (an activity, situation, or matter)

      ‘they have entered into a relationship’
      • ‘Compromise allows us to enter into a win-win situation.’
      • ‘In my opinion, it was a mistake to enter into a living situation with an irresponsible person - even if he is your brother.’
      • ‘The high cost of fuel should not be an excuse to take advantage of the situation and enter into a speculative price frenzy.’
      • ‘The authors of Envisioning Cnhokia attempt to remedy this situation by entering into a dialogue with those who have gone before them.’
      • ‘Remember we entered into this activity with the support of 30 other nations.’
      • ‘For this reason, one should not enter into a dangerous situation without a valid reason.’
      • ‘Copeland evidently regarded such aspirations with deep hostility and responded by entering into fascist political activity for the first time.’
      • ‘Whenever a researcher enters into a secretive situation such as commercial-in-confidence research or military research, they effectively disappear from view.’
      • ‘How does the Government's obligation to enter into discussions in that situation compare with the treaty claims process?’
      • ‘To support their pleasures, some middle-class men entered into criminal activity.’
      participate in, engage in, enter into, join in, get involved in, go in for, throw oneself into, share in, play a part in, play a role in, be a participant in, partake in, contribute to, be associated with, associate oneself with, have a hand in, have something to do with, be party to, be a party to
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Undertake to bind oneself by (an agreement or other commitment)
        ‘the council entered into an agreement with a private firm’
        • ‘One aspect of the post-Cancun phase is that agreements entered into there are binding in law at every level of government.’
        • ‘People need to be reminded that not too long ago, married women did not have the right to own land, or the right to enter into binding legal agreements.’
        • ‘On 14 September 1972 a formal agreement was entered into between the council and the NCB, and the work went ahead.’
        • ‘As a trade union official and a citizen I know the importance of honouring agreements freely entered into.’
        • ‘First, behind closed doors, the council enters into partnership agreements and draws up plans.’
        • ‘When we met the developers they avoided any hard questions asked, yet weeks later this council voted to enter into this agreement with them.’
        • ‘I find it quite remarkable that the council has entered into such an agreement.’
        • ‘The true nature of the contract was that which an architect enters into in any situation where he is designing a home.’
        • ‘Cohabiting couples have not publicly entered into legally binding agreements.’
        • ‘They make secure their homes, families, jobs and friends and they do not undertake risk or enter into long-term commitments.’
      2. 1.2Form part of or be a factor in.
        ‘medical ethics also enter into the question’
        • ‘It's also important to note that, for the first time in our Easter season, human activity enters into the picture.’
        • ‘So all these factors can enter into the capacity to resist.’
        • ‘The factor of material corruption enters into it in some cases.’
        • ‘There are all kinds of subjective factors that enter into it.’
        • ‘His last speech here is not only effectively funny, but reproduces, in a stylized sort of way, a realistic bathos that enters into even the highest-stakes situations.’
        • ‘The protection of the Claimants' reputations in Sudan is not a factor which enters into this equation.’
        • ‘Meditation enters into almost all these activities.’
        • ‘Well, it appears that there are a number of factors that are entering into this.’
        • ‘Certain extraneous factors deserve to enter into selection of a name.’
        • ‘It is not entirely clear what factors entered into the decision to close the station in Peru.’
  • enter on/upon

    • 1Begin (an activity or job); start to pursue (a particular course in life)

      ‘he entered upon a turbulent political career’
      • ‘The government has entered on a collision course with the education community over its new law to reform the university system.’
      • ‘Nations, bordering on the already infected countries, began to enter upon serious plans for the better keeping out of the enemy.’
      • ‘Here, as before, the stress seems to be upon personal dedication, the manner and frame of mind in which a certain course is entered upon and sustained.’
      • ‘She entered on the works with remarkable zest and activity, and rapidly accomplished her self-imposed task to the great admiration of the onlookers.’
      • ‘It was also intended to build an Institute to ‘benefit those who are older in years or who have sufficient energy to enter upon a course of self-improvement’.’
      begin, start, move into, go into, enter on
      View synonyms
    • 2Law
      (as a legal entitlement) go freely into (property) as or as if the owner.

      • ‘The grantee of a right of way has a right to enter upon the grantor's land over which the way extends for the purpose of making the grant effective.’
      • ‘In addition, these minutes permitted the plaintiff to enter upon their property, at the lakefront, from time to time, for the purpose of painting, sketching and drawing the landscape.’
      • ‘On 12 August 1993 the appellants gave notice of their entitlement to enter on the site, and on 27 August 1993 they gave further notice that they would take possession of the plant on 31 August 1993.’
      • ‘It prohibits the appellant from entering on the property of the specified persons for any reason whatsoever.’
      • ‘The position of my client was that he deliberately did not terminate the lease so as to ensure she had a legal capacity to enter upon the land.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French entrer, from Latin intrare, from intra ‘within’.

Pronunciation

enter

/ˈen(t)ər//ˈɛn(t)ər/