Definition of ensemble in English:

ensemble

noun

  • 1A group of musicians, actors, or dancers who perform together.

    ‘a Bulgarian folk ensemble’
    • ‘She's the final element in an ensemble of truly wonderful actors delivering hilarious and memorable performances.’
    • ‘He especially liked the idea of joining an ensemble of actors who each discover new sides to themselves both comic and serious through their willingness to let it all go while they dance.’
    • ‘By sixteen he was performing and writing for large jazz ensembles as well as doing studio work in Los Angeles.’
    • ‘The entire ensemble played with precision and sensitivity.’
    • ‘Some of the major events in the festival are given by the ensembles which bring together top musicians from different countries.’
    • ‘The sublime sounds of this local jazz ensemble will make you stop and listen closely.’
    • ‘The ensemble cast is huge, and there are a few surprising cameos throughout.’
    • ‘I mean, it's an ensemble of fine actors, you know.’
    • ‘The correlation works magnificently, as does the large ensemble of young actors, musicians and technicians from all over Western Canada.’
    • ‘The ensemble consists of three pianos, three harps, and three percussion players.’
    • ‘As well as performances by the only ensemble company of actors in Scotland, there is children's entertainment and music festivals.’
    • ‘More than 25 bands and ensembles will perform more than 40 concerts on Saturday for the Pershore Midsummer Brass event.’
    • ‘Some of the traditional ensembles performing at the Festival in the Desert were made up entirely of women.’
    • ‘One of his strengths as a director here is that he has brought together an ensemble of great actors and his camera is not shy about letting their faces tell the story.’
    • ‘The result is some of the finest ensemble acting ever found in a weekly television show.’
    • ‘Parents were able to stroll around the Music Service's headquarters and to watch the youngsters perform in their individual ensembles and orchestras.’
    • ‘Here, two ensembles of nine dancers mesh into tight circles as individuals hoist themselves aloft, top the mass and dismount, rejoining the group.’
    • ‘In the 1960s, he and Peter Hall did so much to develop the concept of a permanent ensemble where the actors received proper training.’
    • ‘Backed by an ensemble of drummers, dancers and a guitarist, Thornhill explores the awakening spirit of a young black woman through song and spoken word.’
    • ‘Children as young as 10 years old perform alongside the ensemble's core of semi-professional adult musicians.’
    group, band, orchestra, combo
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    1. 1.1 A scene or passage written for performance by a whole cast, choir, or group of instruments.
      • ‘This is a piece for eight dancers, brought together in processions and ensembles, but framed around duets in which classical shapes are sculpted and explored - the beauty of arabesques or slowly revolving turns in attitude.’
      • ‘Now he is a participant in one of the most exciting contemporary world-music ensembles.’
      • ‘This piece d' occasion is said to have been intended for a wedding that never took place and features four soloists and choir in a series of delightful solos, ensembles and choruses.’
      • ‘The ensembles are performed with delicacy or gusto as required.’
      • ‘Each of the players was a skilful soloist, and they each gracefully merged their individual talents to create tight flowing ensembles.’
      • ‘The programme for the evening will include arias, duets and ensembles from operas by Mozart, Puccini, Verdi, Donizetti and Gounod’
      • ‘With their fusion of aria, ensemble, and recitative his operas paved the way for Gluck's reforms of the 1760s.’
      • ‘The work is full of exciting ensembles, arias and orchestral passages with all performers especially the great Aquiles Machado churning out a performance that is well nigh unsurpassable.’
    2. 1.2 The coordination between performers executing an ensemble passage.
      ‘a high level of tuning and ensemble is guaranteed’
      • ‘Certainly, his detail-oriented approach to conducting helped hone the orchestra's ensemble and refine its sound.’
      • ‘The ensemble was also superbly coordinated in the Minuet and Trio and bristling finale, with its driving sequences and rich chains of suspensions.’
      • ‘The soloist and orchestra achieve wonderful clarity and fine ensemble.’
      • ‘Jenkins ability to wield these performers into ensemble and groupings at moments touched the sublime.’
  • 2A group of items viewed as a whole rather than individually.

    ‘the buildings in the square present a charming provincial ensemble’
    • ‘London Cries, depicting the lower orders of the capital, survive in three formats: as broadsheet panels of engravings, as ensembles of individual prints, and as illustrated books.’
    • ‘Not to be missed are the ensemble of classic and contemporary masterpieces put up by stores.’
    • ‘When the curtains rose, a full ensemble would be in view with this building at the centre sitting majestically.’
    • ‘He confirms, backhandedly, that it's simplest to treat ensembles as we do individual artists.’
    • ‘Now, the meaning of goods - once found in individual objects - emerged instead from a total ensemble, the overall system of goods.’
    • ‘Drawings that functioned as studies for individual characters in the ensembles help flesh out sub-themes of the larger, busier compositions.’
    • ‘The painting was thus almost certainly intended as an independent work, rather than as part of a larger ensemble.’
    • ‘The site and its structures were eventually acquired by the city council with a view to renovating the ensemble to house a municipal library and archive.’
    whole, whole thing, entity, unit, unity, body, piece, object, discrete item
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    1. 2.1usually in singular A set of clothes chosen to harmonize when worn together.
      • ‘Her shirtwaist style top was a mint green, the soft pastel bringing out her eyes as she slipped on a simple brown skirt, finishing the ensemble with a fine leather belt.’
      • ‘The graduates were well attired for the occasion, with coloured convocation robes, inner suit and the flat cap completing the ensemble.’
      • ‘I also hoped that to complete the ensemble a midriff top would be added.’
      • ‘The ensemble had a white dress shirt underneath a black blazer.’
      • ‘He wore a black ensemble that consisted of a traditional three-button suit, neatly pressed, hemmed slacks, dress shirt and silk tie.’
      • ‘He was wearing a relaxed ensemble of black pants and shoes, and a crisp white dress shirt.’
      • ‘The resulting ensembles will also be the inspiration for contemporary costume creations and performance pieces.’
      • ‘Samara was wearing an ensemble of a black velvet tube & chiffon dress with a huge light pink ribbon around her waist.’
      • ‘After the addition of a pair of hoop earrings, a black leather jacket, and a black purse, the ensemble was complete.’
      • ‘He wore a thin black vest over a gray shirt, with black fingerless gloves to match the ensemble.’
      • ‘Any rings or chains should be gold (in colour at least) as it just completes the whole ensemble.’
      • ‘I chose the powder grey shirt, light shade of grey tie, pin stripe jacket and pants and to pull the ensemble together some black boots.’
      • ‘Jesse was wearing the whole suit ensemble, minus the tie and the jacket.’
      • ‘The boots began the ensemble, black leather with silver studs outlining them in a tasteful fashion.’
      • ‘Jack went through his drawers of designer clothes, putting together a tasteful ensemble.’
      • ‘Her ensemble was completed by black stockings and heels.’
      • ‘Her black leather pants and boots completed the ensemble.’
      • ‘A white shirt and black vest finished the ensemble.’
      • ‘All that's needed is a blue dress for a harmonious ensemble.’
      • ‘Viridian stands there in a red cloak and black gown, the same ensemble she wore the first time he laid his eyes on her.’
      outfit, costume, suit, coordinates, matching separates, set of clothes
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    2. 2.2Physics A group of similar systems, or different states of the same system, often considered statistically.
      • ‘When dissolved in water, most proteins fold into either a single conformation or a small ensemble of similar conformations.’
      • ‘However, it is probably a wise idea to simulate the same system at different surface areas and using different ensembles.’
      • ‘The interior treatments of the two ensembles reflect the difference in their functions.’
      • ‘Whether by looking at the organisms, or by looking at their DNA, the interest of the microbiologists was in an ensemble, not the individual.’
      • ‘In both proteins these results suggest the unfolded ensemble of conformations retain a substantial number of rigid substructures.’

Origin

Late Middle English (as an adverb (long rare) meaning ‘at the same time’): from French, based on Latin insimul, from in- ‘in’ + simul ‘at the same time’. The noun dates from the mid 18th century.

Pronunciation

ensemble

/ɑnˈsɑmbəl//änˈsämbəl/