Definition of English in English:

English

adjective

  • Relating to England, its people, or their language.

    • ‘Adam, I used to think that being the English language's greatest writer was the highest honour a man could aspire to.’
    • ‘You can steal the recipe from the article if you understand a little of the English language in medieval times.’
    • ‘The group also proposes to venture into English language productions.’
    • ‘Currently the channel broadcasts only in Arabic, but there are plans to create an English language version.’
    • ‘You might consider using the time to learn the English language.’
    • ‘The displays include English language descriptions and parking is conveniently located in front of the building.’
    • ‘Yesterday our English teacher from England told us that he had decided to settle down in Shanghai because he felt it was a safe place.’
    • ‘The offenders are described as two white males, with English accents.’
    • ‘The English language over the last 1,000 years has borrowed words from 350 other languages.’
    • ‘During the following year and a half, she has stayed at home except for giving English classes in language schools on weekends.’
    • ‘Ireland lost the game, to a far superior English side. Perhaps next year we will do better.’
    • ‘Literally, I couldn't even speak the English language well enough to say my lines.’
    • ‘During their stay they took part in various activities as well as English language classes and enjoyed their time in Ireland.’
    • ‘What we are doing is to say that as soon as they go on those visas, they will get no English language training and they will be given no assistance to find a job.’
    • ‘As David points out, they want him extradited for an alleged crime, committed in England against an English bank.’
    • ‘An unwelcome result of these lessons was that my English language abilities began to digress.’
    • ‘But it is Dylan's control and use of the English language that is the most impressive aspect of this book.’
    • ‘So I thought I'd wait to see if it got picked up in the English language press.’
    • ‘Ben left England to be an English teacher in 2000 and started his career in Galicia, in northern Spain.’
    • ‘Students from the private English language school will perform Oliver Twist.’

noun

  • 1The West Germanic language of England, now widely used in many varieties throughout the world.

    • ‘For them it seems very normal that everyone should speak English since English is spoken everywhere.’
    • ‘Four-fifths of the pupils speak languages other than English.’
    • ‘The menu is a single large A3 sheet with English on one side and Russian on the other.’
    • ‘While French is the official language, English, German, Italian and Spanish are widely spoken.’
    • ‘We hear English, Japanese, Arabic, Dutch and Spanish.’
    • ‘And children should be exposed to the entire variety of Englishes, not just one or the other.’
    • ‘Pierre, 14, speaks English as a second language having moved with his French parents to Britain six years ago.’
    • ‘True, English is spoken widely but so have many other languages been - French, Portuguese and Spanish for example.’
    • ‘Turkish and English will be spoken throughout the evening.’
    • ‘Two hundred and fifty poems written by two hundred and thirty poets in fifteen languages were translated into English.’
    • ‘Articles in languages other than English were translated.’
    • ‘Spanish is the first language, but English is widely spoken in the tourist trade.’
    • ‘He was surprised to hear someone speaking English, albeit with a light accent, and spun around.’
    • ‘The group helps students from ages 6-18 develop writing skills and use English as a second language.’
    • ‘He is skilled in several foreign languages such as English, French, Italian and Germany.’
    • ‘Advertising slogans in English and Chinese plaster the side of a double-decker bus in Hong Kong.’
    • ‘Most lived in a home where a language other than English or French was spoken.’
    • ‘She is a pupil at a local school and speaks English as a first language.’
    • ‘The official language is English, but a dialect is widely spoken on informal occasions.’
    • ‘That sentence wasn't written by anyone who speaks English as a first language.’
  • 2as plural noun the EnglishThe people of England.

    • ‘I've nothing against England or the English: I've lived here for eight years and my other half is a Yorkshireman.’
    • ‘Patrick particularly told me about life in England, and the general behaviour of the English.’
    • ‘Only two years later Charles I was executed and his son proclaimed Charles II by the Scots in defiance of the English.’
    • ‘In that same interview, with New York magazine, she delivered what appeared to be a savage attack on England and the English.’
    • ‘Writing on Portuguese wines was dominated by the English.’
    • ‘I'd rather beat someone else to be honest, English, Scottish, whatever.’
    • ‘For example, after the defeat of Napoleon, the English and Russians occupied Paris.’
    • ‘The control of real property was a goal of the Indians as well as the English.’
    • ‘And as any subcontinental cricketer will tell you, beating the English in England is very special.’
    • ‘Those two factors have been the key to England's season, and the core of this side will be English.’
    • ‘In the 1600s this clan had been involved in border wars between the Scots and the English.’
    • ‘His prime subject has always been England and the English.’
    • ‘It's thought to be endemic in the English. ‘An Englishman's home is his castle’.’
    • ‘And shall we condemn the English for what they did to the American and other colonies?’
    • ‘He got a promise of France not interfering in a Spanish war against the English.’
    • ‘The story goes that the first blows were struck at about ten in the morning and for many hours the Normans could make no impression on the English.’
    • ‘For the Indians, the gifts re-enforced their equal partnership with the English.’
    • ‘The Caribbean was a scene of permanent warfare between the English and Spaniards.’
    • ‘But as the English and Americans can't even agree on what to call the punctuation marks.’
    • ‘She overreached herself in a failed attack on Paris and was subsequently captured by the Burgundians who sold her to the English.’
  • 3North American Spin given to a ball, especially in pool or billiards.

    • ‘Make a firm decision on English and/or the cue ball path before bending down to make the shot.’
    • ‘English is used to dramatically increase or decrease the cue ball deflection angle.’
    • ‘Right English on the Cue Ball will throw the Object Ball to the left.’

Origin

Old English Englisc (see Angle, -ish). The word originally denoted the early Germanic settlers of Britain (Angles, Saxons, and Jutes), or their language (now called Old English).

Pronunciation:

English

/ˈiNG(ɡ)liSH/