Definition of engender in English:



  • 1 Cause or give rise to (a feeling, situation, or condition)

    ‘the issue engendered continuing controversy’
    • ‘You engender a feeling of comfort and stability to those within your charge.’
    • ‘We will build on our strengths and continue to engender a love of learning across all subjects for all our students.’
    • ‘Barnett is unable to lead, inspire or engender loyalty.’
    • ‘It engenders neither pity nor fear, rather the kind of mild curiosity you experience when seeing something familiar under a microscope.’
    • ‘The qualities displayed by these members of the force in this incident engenders a feeling of safety and well being in the local community as our trust in a police force, charged with not only upholding the law but our safety, is reinforced.’
    • ‘13 Similar questions have engendered scorn for 40 years.’
    • ‘It engenders feelings of belief in what can be achieved.’
    • ‘For example, a doctor whose relationships with other professionals are problematic may engender negative feelings among peers but still provide good care.’
    • ‘Precaution also engenders a profound sense of humility at how little we know.’
    • ‘What the exceedingly nervous performer needs is not only musical preparation, but also a way to manage the anxiety engendered by the performing situation.’
    • ‘Through experience it was decided, after several years, to drop the prizes because, while they generated intense competition they also engendered bad feeling.’
    • ‘Again, this does not engender confidence in the reliability of the inspector's conclusions.’
    • ‘While the project appears profitable, long-term success depends on continuing to build a strong community that engenders loyalty and popularity, keeping prices up.’
    • ‘Despite its hardships, that journey unveiled a land of unimaginable beauty and variety, with endless space that engendered a feeling of freedom I have not experienced elsewhere.’
    • ‘Whatever the underlying motives, the intended effect of the government's statements and actions is to engender a mood of general fear and panic.’
    • ‘And somehow this engenders a sense that somebody is going to come after us.’
    • ‘While this normally would bring with it a sense of anticipation, the bottle in question only engendered suspicion.’
    • ‘When played properly, the game can only engender feelings of joy and success amongst its participants.’
    • ‘However, what is most important now is to engender confidence.’
    • ‘Many of these changes engender anxiety and fear.’
    cause, be the cause of, give rise to, bring about, lead to, result in, produce, create, generate, arouse, rouse, provoke, incite, kindle, trigger, spark off, touch off, stir up, whip up, induce, inspire, instigate, foment, effect, occasion, promote, foster
    beget, enkindle
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    1. 1.1archaic (of a father) beget (offspring)
      • ‘Urging prospective fathers to take care that their seed is of the right temperature to engender children of a good physical and psychological temper, Charron offers them some practical advice.’
      • ‘When, in turn, we biologically engender a child with a partner, the two parents are equally invested and morally responsible for the child.’
      • ‘Although as a phrase of popular wisdom says, "one can not engender a child with mere desire".’
      • ‘I can not imagine returning home from watching a film and deciding to engender a child.’


Middle English (formerly also as ingender): from Old French engendrer, from Latin ingenerare, from in- in + generare beget (see generate).