Definition of ending in English:

ending

noun

  • 1An end or final part of something, especially a period of time, an activity, or a book or movie.

    ‘the ending of the Cold War’
    • ‘As this is ballet, like opera, there are lots of improbable plot twists before the story concludes with a happy ending.’
    • ‘Invariably most of these cases have had happy endings, says Superintendent of Police.’
    • ‘But, for now, some stories can have happy endings.’
    • ‘In other words, the ending of the occupation requires the defeat of terrorism.’
    • ‘Not all these journeys home have happy endings.’
    • ‘Films with happy endings are usually favoured by the audience.’
    • ‘The endings of the four movies cited all contain an essential element: death - one of the most important themes constituting his style.’
    • ‘So in the end it sort of has a happy ending, in that you get to see Grace exact vengeance.’
    • ‘It gives us a glimpse of the inner woman, who, although she wrote happy endings for her novels, was destined to be disappointed in love.’
    • ‘For Margie and her family, the rescue was a happy ending and the end of a horrible ordeal.’
    • ‘Stories don't normally end in happy endings, but mine did.’
    • ‘You know, books don't always have to end well, and have happy endings.’
    • ‘In other words, clever endings can't conceal that his films are essentially bloodless, forgettable exercises.’
    • ‘It features not one but two happy endings, as he not only tracks down his real father, but overcomes immense odds to win a place in the USAF's prestigious Tops in Blue entertainment troupe.’
    • ‘You will find many sentences beginning with conjunctions and many ending with a preposition.’
    • ‘Well, sometimes, these stories have happy endings.’
    • ‘However, a happy ending was not waiting for me at the end of my quest for financial aid.’
    • ‘Indeed, my dreams usually had happy endings, involving successful intercepts that Saved Civilization.’
    • ‘Hollywood has a long tradition of mining American history for film plots, but lately it's been harder to find those essential happy endings.’
    • ‘Can you think of any stupid endings for the phrase?’
    end, finish, close, closing, conclusion, resolution, summing-up, denouement, finale, final scene, last act
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    1. 1.1 The furthest part or point of something.
      ‘a nerve ending’
      • ‘Many sufferers complain the daily pricking of their fingers is more painful than having an injection due to the mass of nerve endings at their fingertips.’
      • ‘The feet and the hands have millions of nerve endings.’
      • ‘Sound from a microphone placed near the ear is converted to weak electrical currents that activate auditory nerve endings inside the cochlea in the inner ear.’
      • ‘The epithelium consists of five or six constantly renewing cell layers and nerve endings, which account for corneal sensitivity.’
      • ‘Because there are hundreds of nerve endings and close to 30 major pressure points in our feet, sometimes people need a little more than a bath to ease pain and relieve stress.’
      • ‘There are certain nerve endings that extend from the spine to the arms, legs, hands, feet, and all over the body.’
      • ‘Be very gentle with it, there are a lot of nerve endings in this piece of flesh.’
      • ‘It is hoped that after six months there will be some repair and regeneration of some of the thousands of nerve endings in the spine but at such an early stage everyone is naturally ultra-cautious about what it could do.’
      • ‘Unlike hearing aids, they sit inside the ear and instead of simply amplifying sound, actually stimulate the nerve endings to produce electrical impulses and mimic the hearing process.’
      • ‘So they swallow this stuff that gets into the bloodstream and goes to those nerve endings that control the central nervous system.’
      • ‘You're cutting through tissues, bones, blood vessels, nerve endings - it's painful.’
      • ‘They share many nerve endings and chemical transmitters and, throughout life, the gut remains linked to the brain through a network of nerves and hormonal substances.’
      • ‘Yet there are no nerve endings on the exposed surface.’
      • ‘There are a lot of nerve endings in your face.’
      • ‘The more nerve endings in the area, the more painful it might be.’
    2. 1.2 The final part of a word, constituting a grammatical inflection or formative element.
      • ‘Japanese words are composed of many syllables, and endings are attached to change tense, form a negative, or otherwise modify meaning.’
      • ‘The real challenge, though, are the word endings.’
      • ‘It must be nearly 25 years since I was last force-fed irregular verb endings by overenthusiastic French teachers.’
      • ‘It doesn't have separate words for articles, prepositions, or pronouns, which are indicated by altered word endings.’
      • ‘Unlike Russian, however, modern Macedonian does not change the endings of nouns according to their grammatical case.’
      • ‘The structure of Old English was more like Latin in that words had various inflectional endings to indicate their grammatical function.’
      • ‘It's easy enough to see how someone who doesn't know Latin could fail to realize that certain plural endings go with certain singular endings.’
      • ‘The ending is after all where most of the subtle action tends to be, with your verb endings, plurals and suchlike.’
      • ‘In Russian, this sentence is impersonal, without a subject or a predicate, and only Russian case endings indicate the relations between words.’
      • ‘The gender of a noun controls the forms of the article, as well as the endings on adjectives.’
      • ‘By this phase, the children usually spell inflectional endings correctly.’
      conjugation, declension
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Origin

Old English endung ‘termination, completion’(see end, -ing).

Pronunciation

ending

/ˈɛndɪŋ//ˈendiNG/