Definition of encrypt in English:

encrypt

Pronunciation: /enˈkript//inˈkript/

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Convert (information or data) into a cipher or code, especially to prevent unauthorized access.

    • ‘When all other messages are plaintext, a single encrypted message is easily spotted.’
    • ‘Storing customer information as encrypted data on a secure server would also be a good idea.’
    • ‘An encryption algorithm is a mathematical equation containing the message being encrypted or decrypted.’
    • ‘It can also allow digitally signed electronic transactions and encrypt information.’
    • ‘Specifically, encrypt using keys that have been signed and verified by people you know.’
    • ‘The microprocessor encrypts information and provides an encrypted output which is related to the alternator electrical output.’
    • ‘Equally, any email sent with such information should be encrypted.’
    • ‘The music is encrypted with a key that keeps it from being played except on the same machine.’
    • ‘For the time being, don't choose to sign and encrypt all messages automatically.’
    • ‘After all, if we encrypt all the customer data, it will be protected, right?’
    • ‘Take passwords for instance, which are encrypted using a one-way encryption system.’
    • ‘Such protection automatically encrypts all information loaded onto a USB token or other removable media.’
    • ‘Also, it'll be a digitally encrypted signal with an access password.’
    • ‘You'll see a check box that can be used to encrypt the file.’
    • ‘A private key is used to decrypt data encrypted with the corresponding public key and to create digital signatures.’
    • ‘The public key encrypts the information as it's sent from a person's computer to the merchant, and a private key decrypts the information.’
    • ‘At some point, while poking around on that server, he found an unprotected file containing encrypted passwords.’
    • ‘Because of the way passwords are encrypted, the most secure passwords are seven or 14 characters long.’
    • ‘If stolen e-mail is effectively encrypted, it can't be read easily by thieves.’
    • ‘On a basic level they could be used to decode encrypted information almost instantly.’
    • ‘I can shred my documents, encrypt all my communications, and do all sorts of paranoid things.’
    1. 1.1encrypt something in Conceal data in (something) by converting it into a code.
      • ‘They needed to encrypt the meaning in others’ thoughts and be assured their ideas would be perpetuated.’
      • ‘Security is insured by encrypting the data in the exchange, which cannot be scanned or copied by sophisticated theft devices.’
      • ‘If messages have been encrypted in these texts then how do we know we are getting it right?’
      • ‘To understand how and why this information is encrypted in the Periodic Table, we need to define what we mean by an element.’

Origin

1950s (originally US): from en- in + Greek kruptos hidden.

Pronunciation:

encrypt

/enˈkript//inˈkript/