Definition of enchant in US English:

enchant

verb

[with object]
  • 1Fill (someone) with great delight; charm.

    ‘Isabel was enchanted with the idea’
    • ‘This is evidence that buyers are enchanted by connections with the famous, however tenuous.’
    • ‘Reia gazed out the window, her eyes enchanted by the world's serene beauty.’
    • ‘The dream of flight has enchanted humans since ancient times.’
    • ‘It has the royal rose, the fascinating lily, the alluring ‘mogra’, and a host of other colourful flowers which enchant visitors.’
    • ‘The changing light patterns will enchant people of all ages,’ he adds.’
    • ‘How is it that a story deceives us with its deliberate motive of telling lies, yet entices us, enchants us with delight and relief?’
    • ‘Sargent captured her youthful spirit and the complicated charm that so enchanted Parisian society.’
    • ‘I don't know much about her other than that she is a BBC radio personality and has a name that forever captivates and enchants me.’
    • ‘Completely enchanted, they watched the diver from the comfort of the viewing tunnel.’
    • ‘Following the traditional fairy tale of Sleeping Beauty and with the musical score by Tchaikovsky, the performance is certain to enchant audiences of all ages.’
    • ‘What is it about Faberge that still enchants us today?’
    • ‘He enchanted the audience with his sonorous voice and his evocations of Milan.’
    • ‘And Alex was equally enchanted by this woman at his side.’
    • ‘Young international ballerinas in colorful leotards begin the evening with an excitement that enchanted the audience.’
    • ‘From the moment I read that book I was enchanted with the heroism and gallantry and poetry of Collins's life.’
    • ‘David was enchanted with his beautiful young bride and she in turn appeared to be very happy with her new life in Britain.’
    • ‘New acquaintances are genuinely enchanted by my son's name and that tickles me.’
    • ‘He loved dogs and was completely enchanted by Lacy's affable personality.’
    • ‘He is able to capture what's unusual and different and remains deeply enchanted by Asia.’
    • ‘My goal is to create dazzling, juicy watercolors that enchant the viewer,’ she said.’’
    captivate, charm, delight, dazzle, enrapture, entrance, enthral, beguile, bewitch, spellbind, ensnare, fascinate, hypnotize, mesmerize
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Put (someone or something) under a spell.
      ‘an enchanted garden’
      • ‘Dragotin's flute had a power to enchant listeners.’
      • ‘I try and rip the ever-tightening and heating collar from my neck, but it is enchanted and won't come off.’
      • ‘It peeked beyond the brushes of the thorns that surrounded the dark enchanted lands of Ardor.’
      • ‘It was the first and only enchanted weapon that this world would ever know.’
      • ‘This suit is enchanted so it changes with you and it never rips apart.’
      • ‘He enjoyed wandering that enchanted planet, taking in the magic.’
      • ‘The inside of the cottage was much larger than the outside and she new at once that it was enchanted.’
      • ‘The bag was enchanted, and could hold up to ninety pounds of stuff and still only weigh three.’
      • ‘It seemed to shimmer, as if it were enchanted; but it didn't shimmer with light, it shimmered with darkness.’
      • ‘Isn't there a Druid spell that enchants a cloak to help protect you against heat?’
      • ‘Kim also enchanted his swords, giving them a keener edge and a hint of water to them.’
      • ‘The lights in the room danced as if some mystical creature had enchanted them.’
      • ‘With his newly enchanted sword, the imps didn't stand a chance.’
      • ‘It was magically enchanted, so the vender said, and would protect me as needed.’
      • ‘It must create a magnificent spell that could enchant the whole land.’
      • ‘The lightning bolt found its mark, but was defeated by one of the many enchanted items she wore.’
      • ‘Each sword is enchanted in various ways, and each has unique powers, although none overpowered the others.’
      • ‘I can only think they must have enchanted glasses in there, because no matter how much champagne I drank, my glass never seemed to go down.’
      • ‘Wizardry was the art of manipulating objects, doing things such as creating fires and enchanting items.’
      • ‘It wasn't only beautiful, but scary, too, as the best enchanted worlds should be.’

Origin

Late Middle English (in the senses ‘put under a spell’ and ‘delude’; formerly also as inchant): from French enchanter, from Latin incantare, from in- ‘in’ + cantare ‘sing’.

Pronunciation