Definition of emplacement in English:

emplacement

noun

  • 1A structure on or in which something is firmly placed.

    • ‘A twisted propeller and an abandoned gun, mounted on a concrete emplacement, stand beside the memorial.’
    • ‘From the top front corners of the computer terminal, small laser emplacements emerged and aimed at Saurox.’
    1. 1.1 A platform or defended position where a gun is placed for firing.
      • ‘The national guard was called in and set up sandbagged machine gun emplacements downtown.’
      • ‘The captured defensive installations and stationary weapon emplacements can then be used for your side.’
      • ‘Redundant concrete gun emplacements vie with majestic mountains for the attention of tourist cameras.’
      • ‘Throughout the map, you'll discover heavily armed bunkers, guard towers and emplacements to fend off your foes' offensives from land, sea or air.’
      • ‘They operated up to 12 miles behind enemy lines, looking for hidden enemy targets such as artillery and mortar positions, anti-aircraft emplacements, bunker systems and storage caves.’
      • ‘Deployment of weapons and combat hardware in emplacements reduces the probability of their detection two to three times.’
      • ‘Looking out of the bus window, I saw tank traps, sandbagged trenches, tank emplacements, barbed wire, low flying copters.’
      • ‘Unit members claim that a man strolling up to the gun emplacement, spotted their observation post and ‘went for his weapon’.’
      • ‘Old World War II gun emplacements and observation towers rust and crumble silently.’
      • ‘A howitzer is a field artillery piece, used primarily to attack enemy personnel, fortifications, and artillery emplacements.’
      • ‘Crouching down, he could see the enemy's machine-gun emplacement.’
      • ‘His platoon, attacking heavily fortified and strategically located hostile emplacements, had been stopped by intense fire from a large bunker containing several firing posts.’
      • ‘Although already wounded, he left the comparative safety of his position and made a daring charge against the machine-gun emplacement.’
      • ‘On each corner of the warehouses roof were sandbagged machine gun emplacements, which were manned twenty four hours a day and provided the first line in the facility's defence.’
      • ‘Concrete emplacements were built but they were few and far between with each emplacement having little ability to give any other covering fire.’
      • ‘Meanwhile, small groups of airborne troops destroyed bridges and gun emplacements, and captured crossroads and routes inland.’
      • ‘Coalition air forces also strike long-range artillery emplacements, air defense sites and surface-to-surface missile sites.’
      positioning, location, position, situation, lie, bearings, angle, placement, direction, alignment, emplacement, locating, situating
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  • 2Geology
    The process or state of setting something in place or being set in place.

    • ‘They probably represent the time of igneous emplacement of the granitic source rocks.’
    • ‘In both cases, the sequence of events started with extensional basin magmatism and culminated in emplacement of plutons, passing through basin subsidence.’
    • ‘However, the emplacement of these granites is still poorly constrained.’
    • ‘The model therefore ignores the effects of any horizontal loads that might arise as a consequence of ophiolite emplacement.’
    • ‘The abundance of magmatic layering in this granite affords an unusual glimpse of early emplacement processes.’
    • ‘In some instances, there is clear evidence for the accompanying emplacement of mantle-derived mafic magmas, providing a source for the anomalous heating.’
    • ‘However, this mode of emplacement is contradictory to well-established ideas for Archaean granites in the Zimbabwe craton.’
    • ‘The development of extensional and shear fractures in volcanic areas is usually related to magma emplacement at shallow crustal levels.’
    • ‘Of these, only the emplacement and structure of the Strontian Granite has been studied in detail.’
    • ‘The scarcity of evidence from magmatic fabrics for granite emplacement during regional shortening may reflect the general persistence of deformation to sub-solidus states.’

Origin

Early 19th century: from French, from em- in + place a place.

Pronunciation:

emplacement

/əmˈplāsmənt/