Definition of emotion in US English:

emotion

noun

  • 1A natural instinctive state of mind deriving from one's circumstances, mood, or relationships with others.

    ‘she was attempting to control her emotions’
    ‘his voice was low and shaky with emotion’
    ‘fear had become his dominant emotion’
    • ‘He said he could never condone her reaction but her emotions were understandable.’
    • ‘How could she have let him do this to her, to affect her this way that she had no control over her own emotions?’
    • ‘There has been an attempt to defuse aggressive emotions and any desire for revenge.’
    • ‘I let my emotions control me instead of my logic, my hatred win out over my curiosity.’
    • ‘The left part of the picture seems to symbolize the realm of desire and irrational emotions.’
    • ‘Asylum is an issue which continues to stir emotions, both in the town and across the country.’
    • ‘He said the crash had devastated the entire station and emotions were still raw.’
    • ‘It's easier to write a song and sing about intense personal emotions than to talk about them.’
    • ‘It allows you to have strong emotions and opinions without any real risk to yourself.’
    • ‘I guess Dan didn't want me to know he was human and actually had feelings and emotions.’
    • ‘He began to drink heavily and seemed quite incapable of controlling his emotions.’
    • ‘Her emotions were too strong, too raw, for her to be able to suppress them any longer.’
    • ‘The endocrine system is often seen as having a very strong link to the emotions.’
    • ‘She hated letting other people see her cry, as if it was a point of shame to possess human emotions.’
    • ‘The mother struggles to find her own voice amid the turbulent emotions of her offspring.’
    • ‘As his wife fell into a dark world of despair, Adom felt his emotions mirror hers.’
    • ‘Never before had he felt such strong emotions for anyone else besides his family.’
    • ‘It can also be difficult for them to speak to friends about the emotions they are experiencing.’
    • ‘Do you ever feel caught up in emotions and find yourself making a bad decision?’
    • ‘When he does react, he makes sure that his rational side is always in control of his emotions.’
    • ‘She loves the fact that there is an intensity about holidays that can spark strong emotions.’
    • ‘You should respect your elders, but not when they try to manipulate your emotions.’
    feeling, sentiment, sensation
    passion, intensity, warmth, ardour, fervour, vehemence, fire, fieriness, excitement, spirit, soul
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    1. 1.1 Instinctive or intuitive feeling as distinguished from reasoning or knowledge.
      ‘responses have to be based on historical insight, not simply on emotion’
      • ‘The fast footwork, rhythmic clapping and haunting singing radiate an atmosphere of passion and raw emotion.’
      • ‘The death penalty is like human sacrifice in that it is not based on reason, but on emotion.’
      • ‘It is a Water sign, and as such is connected to the world of emotion and the instincts.’
      • ‘As he spoke for those two hypnotic hours, he appealed not to my emotion, but to reason.’
      • ‘Reason and emotion can thus be seen as two complementary systems in the human brain for making decisions.’
      • ‘Also, would you care to explain why logical rational thought is more valid than emotion and intuition?’
      • ‘Romance calls for passion and usually an outpouring of emotion and sentiment.’
      • ‘Since Plato, many philosophers have sought to make a sharp distinction between reason and emotion.’
      • ‘With knowledge comes realisation and emotion, not always happy, but always positive.’
      • ‘Life today is guided not by logic and reason but rather by emotion, fear and sentimentality.’
      • ‘We act irresponsibly if we ignore the way in which emotion can drive reason from the field.’
      • ‘I wish people would stop mistaking sentimentality for serious emotion.’
      • ‘An action that springs from desire, emotion, or interest is therefore heteronomous.’
      • ‘I think all my books are embarrassingly awash with sentimentality and emotion.’
      • ‘This fake show of emotion is embarrassing and entirely unjustified.’
      • ‘It addresses the audience by distracting its reason and arousing its emotion.’
      • ‘The path down is usually the feminine journey, which brings us to emotion, instinct and intuition.’
      • ‘Many actors play down the intellectual side of their work, and talk instead about operating on emotion and instinct.’
      • ‘The world cannot tolerate these old claims, most times based on sheer hysteria and emotion.’
      • ‘Women opt for romance, emotion and tears; men favour blood, crime and technology.’
      • ‘Public displays of emotion, aggression and anxiety are an accepted form of behaviour.’
      instinct, intuition, gut feeling, inclination
      View synonyms

Origin

Mid 16th century (denoting a public disturbance): from French émotion, from émouvoir ‘excite’, based on Latin emovere, from e- (variant of ex-) ‘out’ + movere ‘move’. The current sense dates from the early 19th century.

Pronunciation

emotion

/əˈmoʊʃ(ə)n//əˈmōSH(ə)n/