Definition of embankment in English:

embankment

noun

  • 1A wall or bank of earth or stone built to prevent a river flooding an area.

    • ‘According to the RSPB, the River Earn is cut off from its natural flood plain by earth embankments protecting agricultural land.’
    • ‘The epilogue calls the 1999 floods ‘the inevitable consequence of neglecting the channel and embankments of the main river’.’
    • ‘The approved scheme, which should start in May and continue until the end of 2003, will contain the Derwent within flood walls and embankments varying in height between 1.4m and 1.7m.’
    • ‘If your home was inundated in the floods of November 2000, or came within inches of disaster, you may just have wondered whether existing flood walls and embankments should be strengthened or new ones built.’
    • ‘Heavily swollen with monsoon rains in mid-July, the river breached its earth embankments swamping large areas of the district within half an hour.’
    • ‘A huge Flood Action Plan, for instance, called for ever-higher embankments to keep the rivers at bay.’
    • ‘The document proposes strengthening and raising flood embankments alongside the River Ouse, which protect homes in the Leeman Road area, but which were almost overwhelmed in 2000.’
    • ‘But Environment Agency chiefs said that level should be inches below the top of the city's flood walls and embankments, which protect hundreds of homes in the city.’
    • ‘The agency has drawn together flood prevention options ranging from improving upland management techniques, and the blocking of moorland drainage channels, to the construction of embankments or walls as local flood defences.’
    • ‘Malton, Norton and Old Malton - some of the towns worst hit by flooding - will receive £6.3m for a programme involving building embankments and walls along the River Derwent.’
    • ‘It said the flood walls and embankments being proposed would vary in height between one and 1.8 metres and protect most of the village, including the A166, against a one in 100-year flooding event.’
    • ‘In Malton and Norton, defences will be a mix of reinforced concrete retaining walls, earth embankments and steel sheet piling to run parallel with the river.’
    • ‘Flood walls and embankments protect large areas of lower Bootham, Clifton Green and Leeman Road, as well as North Street on the opposite bank of the river from the Guildhall.’
    • ‘The work will involve the construction of maximum strength earth embankments and masonry walls along the Derwent, as well as the installation of floodgates, penstocks and flood valves.’
    • ‘The channel gouged out for the river is about 20 feet deep and flanked by high concrete walls or earth embankments.’
    • ‘A planning application for Malton and Norton's flood defences, which will consist of embankments and flood walls, will be submitted this week.’
    • ‘There are 140,000 addresses in Hull relying on walls and embankments to prevent flooding every day of the year.’
    • ‘The city's Bureau of Public Works prepared about 140,000 sandbags and distributed them to emergency rescue teams in each city district and to areas with unfinished river embankments.’
    • ‘The proposed new scheme will include a combination of sheet piling walls, reinforced concrete walls and earth embankments.’
    • ‘The Environment Agency wants to spend £4.5m raising floodwalls and embankments to keep flood waters in the River Ouse channel and to allow for predicted rises in sea levels.’
    1. 1.1 A bank of earth or stone built to carry a road or railroad over an area of low ground.
      • ‘Railway workers spray kilos of the stuff on railways and embankments.’
      • ‘The landscape is tremendous; flat, featureless fields, slight rolling hills, narrow roads with large embankments blocking the view.’
      • ‘The erosion in Ketahun district in North Bengkulu regency had already damaged parts of the highway, and road embankments built on five-meter-high cliffs had collapsed due to the continuous pounding of waves early this year.’
      • ‘The footpath is to allow disabled access from the bottom of Crofters Lea down the old railway embankment to Milner's Road.’
      • ‘The bridge structure is close to completion with only the embankments and access roads on both ends still to be finished over the next six months.’
      • ‘Once the vehicle's momentum had carried it towards the embankment alongside the railway tracks there would have been no way it could have been halted in time.’
      • ‘Boggy bits slowed us for the first half mile, then we hit the pastures down by the river, connected with the embankment of the disused railway line and picked up speed.’
      • ‘It was agreed with the contractor of the Deeside road that all embankments should be completed by November 1796 and that no metal should be laid on the roadway ‘until March 1797’.’
      • ‘This species tends to colonise waste ground and railway embankments.’
      • ‘Firstly, it is evident that considerable improvements have been carried out along the railway embankment.’
      • ‘The fossils had been collected in the early 1840s in pits dug to provide material for the embankments to carry Brunel's Great Western Railway from London to Bristol.’
      • ‘Despite this I was pleased to see that Armitt is emphasising the need to repair bridges, viaducts, embankments and signal boxes rather than glamorous projects like the West Coast Route Modernisation.’
      • ‘An engineered embankment and access roads stretch its footprint to 1,100 acres.’
      • ‘Police said a Land Rover that had careered down an embankment onto the railway line had set off the accident.’
      • ‘Where capital was readily available, as on most European main lines, civil engineering could defy topography, and span great valleys on embankments and viaducts, and drive tunnels through mountain ridges.’
      • ‘The engineers of Spt Coy needed the pile driver to hammer four-metre sheet piles into the ground to stabilise embankments for road construction.’
      • ‘It slid off the road and down an embankment on to the East Coast main line.’
      • ‘He told the council last Tuesday that speed restrictions have already been put on trains as they go over the embankment close the village railway station.’
      • ‘Another man was killed this time last year when the truck he was driving veered off the road and down the railway embankment on to the tracks.’
      • ‘Chaos hit the M60 around Manchester today after a tanker careered off a slip road and down an embankment, killing the driver.’
      bank, mound, ridge, earthwork, causeway, barrier, levee, dam, dyke
      View synonyms

Pronunciation

embankment

/əmˈbaNGkmənt//əmˈbæŋkmənt/