Definition of electromagnetism in English:

electromagnetism

noun

  • 1The interaction of electric currents or fields and magnetic fields.

    • ‘For those of you not up to speed with your physics, the grand unification theory is the idea that the four forces of nature - the weak and strong nuclear forces, electromagnetism and gravity - can all be explained by a single theory.’
    • ‘Physicists say that at high energies there is a symmetry between the electromagnetic and weak interactions: electromagnetism and the weak force appear different to us at low energies because this symmetry is broken.’
    • ‘It should be able to predict the masses of the most elementary particles of Nature, tell us the relative strengths of the forces of gravity, electromagnetism, weak and strong interactions, and much else besides.’
    • ‘The holy grail of theoretical physics is to find a single unified theory that describes the four fundamental forces: gravity, electromagnetism, and the strong and weak nuclear forces.’
    • ‘The sense of achievement and closure for theoretical physics that came with the brilliant success of the classical field theory of electromagnetism was short lived.’
    1. 1.1 The branch of physics concerned with this.
      • ‘Until the 1940's, similar problems appeared when physicists attempted to reconcile electromagnetism and quantum mechanics.’
      • ‘Einstein's special theory of relativity, which makes classical mechanics consistent with classical electromagnetism, treats time like a coordinate in a unified spacetime geometry.’
      • ‘The physics course covers only two of the five big areas of introductory physics - mechanics and electromagnetism.’
      • ‘For the remainder of his life he sought without success a unified field theory embracing electromagnetism, gravitation, and quantum mechanics.’
      • ‘If the laws of electromagnetism and nuclear physics were only slightly different, chemistry and biology would be impossible.’

Pronunciation:

electromagnetism

/əˌlektrōˈmaɡnəˌtizəm/