Definition of edict in English:

edict

noun

  • An official order or proclamation issued by a person in authority.

    • ‘The bureaucracy in Beijing issues edicts on mine safety but does not provide the necessary funds.’
    • ‘Another step forward was the progressive declarations of invalidity extended to certain laws, decrees, and edicts issued in Stalin's time.’
    • ‘Word of this soon reached the British top brass, who sent down an official edict ordering that the practice cease immediately.’
    • ‘It is easy to issue laws and edicts, particularly when there is no need to gain the consent of elected or appointed representatives.’
    • ‘Each time the religious institution issues custom-made edicts for political purposes, it loses credibility.’
    • ‘Issuing edicts founded on the false premise that whatever the bishop declares to be a mortal sin is a mortal sin is not teaching.’
    • ‘You can issue an edict to cut taxes, which really helps boost your population's happiness.’
    • ‘Apart from royal edicts on certain general issues, the king's domains were subject to no law and no administrative practice common to them all without exception.’
    • ‘However, much more paradoxical edicts were issued under the totalitarian regime.’
    • ‘Sure, my son can ask for a reason after I issue one of my edicts.’
    • ‘Clerics issued religious edicts against the British when they invaded Iraq during the First World War.’
    • ‘He issued an edict that there will be no flight training at any of the Chicago-owned airports.’
    • ‘On 12 February 1912 an edict of abdication was issued on behalf of the child Emperor.’
    • ‘Although government clerics often issue edicts against terror, the bulk of the government's effort has been security-related.’
    • ‘That apparently was too much for the Taliban government, which then issued its edict.’
    • ‘An edict was issued to this effect and by 1636, France had a navy of nearly 40 ships.’
    • ‘And would the pope issue edicts blaming the United States for bringing the whole tragedy upon itself?’
    • ‘An imperial edict against infanticide was issued by Valentinian in 374- making an exception for the very poor.’
    • ‘The word bull is still used in English for a Papal Bull, an edict issued by the Pope.’
    • ‘Finally he issued an edict, prohibiting the smoking of tobacco throughout the New Netherlands.’
    decree, order, command, commandment, mandate, proclamation, pronouncement, dictum, dictate, fiat, promulgation, precept
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Latin edictum ‘something proclaimed’, neuter past participle of edicere, from e- (variant of ex-) ‘out’ + dicere ‘say, tell’.

Pronunciation

edict

/ˈēdikt//ˈidɪkt/