Definition of eaves in US English:

eaves

plural noun

  • The part of a roof that meets or overhangs the walls of a building.

    • ‘The doorway into the main dwelling was intact and the walls rose to the eaves.’
    • ‘Large, flowery hanging baskets dangle from lamp posts and the eaves of buildings.’
    • ‘There are many new products on the market that will provide inlet air at the eave of the roof by bringing in the air from behind the gutters, through the roof sheathing, and under the shingle materials.’
    • ‘The woman led me into the small room under the eaves of the roof.’
    • ‘Being on a level near the roof where it sloped downwards, they were able to attach the thin cables that commonly referred to as lines by the small suction cup on the end to an overhanging eave and climb onto the roof.’
    • ‘Consider fixing up some bat boxes too, high up on a wall, near the eaves of the house or in a tall tree.’
    • ‘Overhang the eave by 1/2 inch and leave a space of 1/16 inch between each shingle.’
    • ‘The spatial containment of the outside room is supported by extending the eave and by the fireplace.’
    • ‘Older units with asbestos roofs and low eaves are particularly unpopular.’
    • ‘Small windows under large eaves made this typical 1960s tract ranch house too dark.’
    • ‘Flying above all this are the wide overhanging eaves of the low slope timber roofs.’
    • ‘The design includes a hipped and gabled roof, deep eaves, a side deck, and a screened front porch.’
    • ‘They also build nests in unwanted places such as air vents and eaves of buildings.’
    • ‘They often made their homes in the eaves under the roofs of houses where they would hunt the mice that dwelt there in great numbers.’
    • ‘Set your ladder against the house eaves so it extends a few feet above the roof.’
    • ‘To accomplish this smoothly, place a straight edge down the slope of the roof overhanging the eave.’
    • ‘He stood under the eaves of the roof allowing the rain to give himself a shower.’
    • ‘Its features include floors raised off the ground and steeply pitched roofs with deep overhanging eaves.’
    • ‘This bird was feeding young in a nest perched in the eaves of one of the temple buildings.’
    • ‘Before man provided shelter in the shape of overhanging eaves, martins were cliff and cave dwellers.’

Origin

Old English efes (singular); of Germanic origin; related to German dialect Obsen, also probably to over.

Pronunciation

eaves

/ēvz//ivz/