Definition of easy in English:



  • 1Achieved without great effort; presenting few difficulties.

    ‘an easy way of retrieving information’
    • ‘That seems to be the easy way out - and just what many of the far right would like to see happen.’
    • ‘Reivin was dodging using very little effort, as if this was all far too easy for him.’
    • ‘However, working in the film industry is no easy task, confesses Rocky.’
    • ‘It's easy to see why the candidates are so eager talk about anything other than marriage.’
    • ‘With so many people to choose from, booking several dates in a short amount of time is easy.’
    • ‘While finding a partner or date is hard, maintaining the relationship should be easy.’
    • ‘He said it was easy for politicians to make spending promises but more difficult to find the money.’
    • ‘It is easy to tell who is really serious about the profession.’
    • ‘I encountered no glitches in my testing, and found it fairly easy to use.’
    • ‘The upper half of the deck is placed within easy reach of all players.’
    • ‘But it is surprisingly easy to forget what you spend in a day.’
    • ‘The pages will be ordered by category to allow easy access by the user.’
    • ‘The recovery environment will boot and present a menu system that is fairly easy to navigate.’
    • ‘Capturing and holding the attention of a classroom for an entire lecture period is no easy task.’
    • ‘Butterflies are attracted to brightly colored, sweet-smelling flowers that allow them easy access.’
    • ‘The real difficulty is that it's very easy for someone to mess up these predictions.’
    • ‘Usually, I find it fairly easy to find a representative sample of a photographer's work.’
    • ‘We found this unit relatively easy to use.’
    • ‘We hear a lot about how it has become too easy to get into university these days.’
    • ‘It will not be easy for Lin to achieve his aim, but setbacks just seem to spur him on.’
    uncomplicated, not difficult, undemanding, unexacting, unchallenging, effortless, painless, trouble-free, facile, simple, straightforward, elementary, idiot-proof, plain sailing
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    1. 1.1[attributive](of an object of attack or criticism) having no defense; vulnerable.
      ‘he was vulnerable and an easy target’
      • ‘It is thought that the attacker preyed on him because he thought he was an easy target.’
      • ‘So often the local authorities are an easy target for criticism, sometimes unfair and unjustified.’
      • ‘Everyone who has played them has regarded them as an easy target.’
      • ‘It is this false sense of security that makes them such easy targets.’
      • ‘He's an easy target and they all laid into him with predictable criticism for being out of touch and old fashioned.’
      • ‘Being slow does make them easy targets and one RAAF aircraft has come under attack in Baghdad.’
      • ‘I look like easy pickings for the local bullies, but I'm not.’
      • ‘Part of the reason is that the lunch programs are an easy target for political special interests.’
      • ‘They concluded that the generators would be an easy target for a terrorist attack of enormous consequence.’
      • ‘Orkney has become a possible easy target for smugglers because of the lack of permanent Customs cover in the islands’
      • ‘Police had also warned candidates not to extend election meetings late into the night as it would make them easy targets for assassins.’
      • ‘During WWII, neon was ordered off, for fear it would make easy bombing targets.’
      • ‘Thanks to harassed arts writers looking for easy targets, mime traditionally gets a bit of a kicking at the festival.’
      • ‘Mr Weston, a lifelong biker, said: " Bikers are easy pickings.’
      • ‘You searched for premises which were comparatively easy targets.’
      • ‘His step mum believes his condition could make him an easy target.’
      • ‘The stretch of 62 kilometers of the outer ring road has been a haunt for criminals who find easy targets.’
      • ‘I know as I've done it in other big games on the world stage, but referees always have been, and always will be, easy targets.’
      • ‘Pedigree dogs worth hundreds of pounds are being seen as an easy target by criminals who sell them on at bargain prices to new owners.’
      • ‘It is an easy point of criticism Larry, but the problem with family violence is the hidden nature of it.’
      vulnerable, susceptible, exploitable, defenceless, naive, gullible, trusting, credulous, impressionable
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    2. 1.2informal, derogatory (of a woman) open to sexual advances; sexually available.
      ‘her reputation at school for being easy’
      • ‘I think I'm funny, smart, attractive, vivacious; does that mean guys automatically think I'm easy?’
      • ‘Just ‘cause I'm pregnant doesn't mean I'm easy!’’
      • ‘Nobody is going to think you're easy, in fact they will probably think you are sensible and cautious.’
      • ‘Yet she wasn't easy like some of the girls hanging out around Soho at that time.’
      • ‘I can't believe how harsh some people are about me trying to get it on with Daniel just because I'd had a little too much to drink doesn't mean that I'm easy.’
      • ‘He must think I'm such a slut, that I'm easy white trash.’
      • ‘They thought she was easy, that they could buy her a drink and then get into her pants at the end of the night.’
      promiscuous, sexually indiscriminate, free with one's favours, of easy virtue, unchaste, loose, wanton, abandoned, licentious, dissolute, dissipated, debauched
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  • 2(of a period of time or way of life) free from worries or problems.

    ‘promises of an easy life in the New World’
    • ‘It has not been an easy year and can only be described as a ‘roller coaster’ of emotion.’
    • ‘He swears life was easy until he headed out into the world to make it by just being himself.’
    • ‘It won't be an easy summer for Ridsdale, but unlike the next manager, he can be sure he'll be there this time next year.’
    • ‘In many ways, life is too easy for those American developers.’
    • ‘Law is not expecting an easy season, though, despite Lancashire's drop in status.’
    • ‘He looked set for an easy season after early domination, but a slump in his form mid-season made a race of it.’
    • ‘Mr Heavens said it had not been an easy year from that point of view.’
    • ‘It hasn't been an easy day for the governors, so great to see you here.’
    • ‘Fourteen is not an easy age and getting your children into the right frame of mind for these tests can be difficult.’
    • ‘The rally was a new event for everyone and it's not been an easy weekend.’
    • ‘Now that competition has been introduced into the tertiary system, the easy days are over.’
    • ‘We found ourselves standing on a threshold one easy summer evening, looking at the stars.’
    • ‘The second day we had an easy day to let us get accustomed to the eight hour time difference.’
    • ‘Bristol is an easy weekend trip from Scotland, and city-centre hotels at the right price do not come much better than this one.’
    • ‘Monaco is a special race on the Formula One calendar and Schumacher does not expect an easy weekend ahead.’
    • ‘Life has not always been easy for the 41-year-old, who was born in Bolton but grew up in Edinburgh.’
    • ‘The house in the suburbs, the sense of life being easy and calm, it was a little dull but fulfilling.’
    • ‘Those first few years weren't easy, but I kept the club up in difficult circumstances.’
    • ‘These are not easy days, for sitting shiva is emotionally and physically draining.’
    • ‘And things aren't always easy for famous people like my dad.’
    calm, tranquil, serene, quiet, peaceful, trouble-free, untroubled, undisturbed, unworried, contented, relaxed, comfortable, secure, safe
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    1. 2.1(of a person) lacking anxiety or awkwardness; relaxed.
      ‘his easy and agreeable manner’
      ‘they didn't feel easy about what they were doing’
      • ‘There are kids riding horses and dogs chasing sticks yet we're all easy like Sunday morning.’
      • ‘He is so easy with it that like a general who has always won battles, he has won loud applause from the audience after each show.’
      • ‘I'm easy, either way, just so long as we don't have to go back and live in Wales again.’
      natural, casual, informal, unceremonious, unreserved, uninhibited, unconstrained, unforced, unaffected, free and easy, easy-going, familiar, amiable, affable, genial, congenial, agreeable, good-humoured
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archaic, informal
  • Without difficulty or effort.

    ‘we all scared real easy in those days’
    • ‘We were playing basketball just dribbling it easy along the graffiti lot.’
    • ‘It was the first time she ever gave me a real compliment, and I was surprised how easy it came to her lips.’
    • ‘He found the looking glass easy enough, though why it was intact he couldn't say.’


  • Be careful.

    ‘easy, girl—you'll knock me over!’


  • be easier said than done

    • Be more easily talked about than put into practice.

      • ‘This is often easier said than done because it takes practice and commitment.’
      • ‘Indeed, to cultivate altruism is easier said than done and to do away with time-honoured beliefs is almost hopeless.’
      • ‘At the other end the Westport forwards will have to step up to the plate in a big way but that's easier said than done against the Nallens and company.’
      • ‘Because inactivity weakens the back muscles, pain sufferers should stay active, but it is sometimes easier said than done.’
      • ‘Putting quality on to the nation's screens (and into the nation's radio speakers) is easier said than done.’
      • ‘The problem is that growing protein crystals is a lot easier said than done - at least on terra firma.’
      • ‘Though I know that is easier said than done, I can support that goal as an ideal.’
      • ‘The etiquette rule is to use the furthest outside one as the different courses are served, but that is easier said than done.’
      • ‘Forty years' experience has shown this is easier said than done, but surely it's possible.’
      • ‘I know, it's easier said than done, but it is something to aim for.’
  • (as) easy as pie

    • Very easy.

      • ‘His light, super-speedy footwork gave his dancing a distinctive snap, and he made it all look easy as pie.’
      • ‘It's as easy as Pie. Today I had my final lesson on what has to be one of THE most boring topics in mathematics.’
      • ‘It's easy as pie -- when you know how to do it.’
      • ‘It's as easy as pie. A quick trip down to home depot for the network crimper and some connectors and you're done.’
      • ‘It's as easy as pie to visualize the possibilities.’
  • easy come, easy go

    • Used to indicate that a relationship or possession acquired without effort may be abandoned or lost casually and without regret.

      • ‘For him, allegations are easy come, easy go.’
      • ‘A job, a relationship, my savings account: It was easy come, easy go.’
      • ‘They nick them too, but I think easy come, easy go.’
      • ‘They've won fame rather than worked for it, and they've treated it pretty much like Viv Nicholson handled her pools win - easy come, easy go.’
  • easy does it

    • Used especially in spoken English to advise someone to approach a task carefully and slowly.

      • ‘Carter shushed her, ‘Hey, easy does it there, Laura.’’
      • ‘So easy does it with the imagery from now on, I promise.’
      • ‘‘Whoa, easy does it,’ stated the man Jasper had so uncharacteristically bashed into.’
      • ‘Whether your sending out a quick ‘hello’ or ‘meet us here later’, it's easy does it all the way.’
      • ‘Easy, easy does it, not too much, just a little bit more.’
  • easy on the eye (or ear)

    • informal Pleasant to look at (or listen to)

      • ‘We wanted people who are easy on the eye, who are really good actors, who are still in their 20s and who were available.’
      • ‘The paintings are easy on the eye and very pleasant but we think that the artist is stopping short of something quite extraordinary.’
      • ‘Invested with 16 years of research, the trainers are not only easy on the eye but they're also alleged to help you exercise more efficiently.’
      • ‘Neighbours of two new futuristic ‘solar dwellings’ have been warned that the environmentally-friendly properties may not be so easy on the eye.’
      • ‘The teenage appeal doubtless springs from the fact that all of the boys are pretty easy on the eye, but that's as far as the similarities go.’
      • ‘Manicured lawns, weeded borders and pruned shrubs may be easy on the eye, but they're not necessarily great for encouraging wildlife.’
      • ‘Thankfully, there was a diving team on hand to make sure none of us drowned - and they were all pretty easy on the eye.’
      • ‘Both the cut scenes and in-game animation are quite smooth and generally pretty easy on the eye.’
      • ‘Clean lines punctuated with specimen plants are ideal not only because they are easy on the eye, but they also have the practical benefit of aiding security.’
      • ‘My two nearest neighbours are rather nice chaps who also happen to be exceptionally easy on the eye.’
      good-looking, attractive, nice-looking, handsome, lovely, beautiful, pretty, as pretty as a picture, stunning, striking, arresting, prepossessing, winning, fetching, captivating, bewitching, beguiling, engaging, charming, charismatic, enchanting, appealing, delightful, irresistible
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  • go (or be) easy on someone

    • informal Refrain from being harsh with or critical of someone.

      • ‘The students were polite and went easy on the coach who was sacked earlier this season.’
      • ‘For what it's worth, I don't think Jay has gone easy on Arnold in the monologues but he has certainly left himself wide open to the charge.’
      • ‘‘Don't you play games with me, now tell me and we'll go easy on you… well easier,’ Toby growled.’
      • ‘Jack was livid but went easy on him as Frank bursts into tears quite readily now after the rough handling he got on the culture review.’
      • ‘I was easy on him the week before the race and he was a good bit off full fitness.’
      • ‘Authorities will most likely resist any deal which may create a perception that they've gone easy on a person convicted for drug trafficking.’
      • ‘Good leadership isn't about pandering to your troops and going easy on them - it's about training them to standard so they come alive from combat.’
      • ‘She's still nice and went easy on all the amateur performers.’
      • ‘I don't know why I went easy on them in my previous posts, as I wanted to share all the things they do poorly when I posted recaps.’
      • ‘I think the press wants a good story, and they don't sit and think about who we're going to be easy on, who we're going to be hard on.’
  • go easy on something

    • informal Be sparing or cautious in one's use or consumption of something.

      ‘go easy on fatty foods’
      • ‘Counterintuitive though this may seem, many individuals get good control over cholesterol by going easy on their consumption of bread, potatoes, rice and pasta.’
      • ‘In fact, the traditional English favorite, Yorkshire Pudding, was the way that farmers wives filled the family up on a wad of bread so that they went easy on the expensive meat.’
      • ‘Also, go easy on how much protein you eat, since large amounts can block calcium absorption.’
      • ‘Snuggle if you can, and go easy on the drink - don't give him an excuse to say it was a mistake.’
      • ‘Club heroes watch what they eat, go easy on the drink and refrain from cigarettes.’
      • ‘Considering I was supposed to be going easy on the carbs this week, this is bad.’
  • have it easy

    • informal Be free from difficulties; be fortunate.

      • ‘They didn't have it easy because I am quite an impatient person when it comes to training, I just want to do as much as I can.’
      • ‘A sense of failure is a horrible feeling, especially to someone like me who's always had it easy, and never really failed a subject at school.’
      • ‘But for the life of me, I can't see how anybody in their right mind could possibly think she's had it easy.’
      • ‘There is no single country that is having it easy.’
      • ‘By comparison with my days of school report writing (all had to be written by hand, in permanent ink), teachers of today have it easy.’
      • ‘The Bay Area is a fortunate place with plentiful resources so we kind of have it easy.’
      • ‘Blige, who grew up in the projects, has never had it easy, and the tough times remain embedded in her lyrics.’
      • ‘Despite the expected traffic jams, potential electrical brown-outs and terrorist threats, modern Olympians and spectators have it easy, compared to their ancient counterparts.’
      • ‘My guess is that throughout the early to mid 1990s Labour had it easy.’
      • ‘The girls who walked the ramp on Monday had to answer questions about every thing from history, philosophy to music and clearly they did not have it easy.’
  • i'm easy

    • informal Said by someone when offered a choice to indicate that they have no particular preference.

      • ‘There are a lot of good ways to do so - I'm easy like that.’
      • ‘I enjoy producing things people like and can play in… I get a kick out of it and as long as I can break even, I'm easy.’
      • ‘If you don't want it to work, that's ok, I'm easy, I don't mind.’
  • of easy virtue

    • dated (of a woman) sexually promiscuous.

      • ‘Beautiful and well-bred, she suffered the hostile treatment of critics who believed that as a painter she must be a woman of easy virtue.’
      • ‘In this case a lady reputed to be of easy virtue and a girlfriend of one of the local policemen, had made statements intimidating the men for trial.’
      • ‘She speaks of a woman of easy virtue and outstanding beauty who, when painters went to her to take her portrait, ‘showed as much of her person as she could with propriety’.’
      • ‘There is a woman of easy virtue, also gleefully played by Jane Nash, who tries to entrap Bob and the usual subplot of the squire's nephew trying to anticipate his inheritance.’
      • ‘‘Most of the money was spent on booze and women of easy virtue - whores in other words,’ he told me in an interview.’
      • ‘He has been brought up by a lady of easy virtue in the bazaar.’
      • ‘Piercings were sometimes worn by women, but only those of easy virtue.’
      • ‘They looked gorgeous and portrayed, - and I hope they will not take this amiss - ladies of easy virtue decoratively and to the life.’
      • ‘In Shanghai Express, probably her finest film, she was a woman of easy virtue, mouthing the famous line.’
      • ‘He is promptly thrown into the seamy world of Montreal's nightlife - its clubs, its cabarets, its women of easy virtue.’
      promiscuous, sexually indiscriminate, free with one's favours, of easy virtue, unchaste, loose, wanton, abandoned, licentious, dissolute, dissipated, debauched
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  • rest (or sleep) easy

    • Be untroubled by (or go to sleep without) worries.

      ‘this insurance policy will let you rest easy’
      • ‘But on the basis of present evidence we can rest easy.’
      • ‘The Home Secretary can rest easy in his bed tonight.’
      • ‘They can sleep easy at night, burying thoughts that intruders may compromise their privacy.’
      • ‘That's not my fight, and I'll sleep easy tonight knowing that I've answered the call of duty with an extra topping of usefulness.’
      • ‘How this person can sleep easy at night is beyond me.’
      • ‘Regardless of what the polls might indicate, citizens are no longer resting easy in the belief that their government can be trusted to protect their interests.’
      • ‘If you were worried that the band had lost their touch, that they just weren't capable of making a good album, you can rest easy.’
      • ‘Can we sleep easy at nights knowing that people are being paid sweatshop wages for our benefit?’
      • ‘A Ladbrokes spokesman said: ‘It looks like all the bookies will be sleeping easy in their beds on Christmas morning.’’
      • ‘Now you can sleep easy, safe in the knowledge that someone in a position of power is promoting your agenda.’
  • take the easy way out

    • Extricate oneself from a difficult situation by choosing the simplest or most expedient course rather than the most honorable or ethical one.

      • ‘In most science exhibitions, there are student groups that take the easy way out and opt for a project that can be put together using easily available material.’
      • ‘As the economy plods along, many of us are choosing to take the easy way out.’
      • ‘I took the easy way out and did the very unsporting thing of hiding my assigned fabric inside the pockets as a lining.’
      • ‘We should ensure that the government does that work, rather than taking the easy way out and sacrificing justice to expediency.’
      • ‘It is just not true, as his critics assert, that he always took the easy way out.’
      • ‘As finance minister, Ng never took the easy way out.’
      • ‘He chose to take the easy way out and slam the council.’
      • ‘To take the easy way out, one might just chalk both up to blatant stupidity, but there are always other reasons as well.’
      • ‘Too often, the scripts choose to take the easy way out.’
      • ‘There is a sense of entitlement that I think has caused many to take the easy way out.’
  • take it easy

    • 1Proceed calmly and in a relaxed manner.

      • ‘‘Dude, take it easy, I was just messing around,’ Ryan wiped a little blood from his nose.’
      • ‘At one point in my career, I started to realise that I should take it easy, I should calm down.’
      • ‘Larry, I think everyone should just kind of relax, take it easy.’
      • ‘It forces me to calm down, take it easy, and take every shot at a time, and forget the bad ones, which of course there are many.’
      • ‘‘Hey wow, calm down, take it easy girl,’ I said holding my hands up in self-defence.’
      • ‘He said just, you know, be calm, take it easy.’
      • ‘The little question mark at the end was left in the air to imply that we are relaxed about this, so take it easy, take it easy.’
      • ‘You need to be comfortable and relaxed, so take it easy.’
      • ‘Well, in any case, you've got another few weeks around him, so I say take it easy.’
      • ‘How can I take it easy when Mark is off sneaking around with God knows who?’
      1. 1.1Make little effort; rest.
        • ‘I decided to just relax and I took it easy all weekend long.’
        • ‘The application of aspirin and bed rest pulled him through it by midday today and he took it easy for the rest of the day, getting better by the hour.’
        • ‘Since Christmas Day - just two days ago - I've been ‘chilling out’, relaxing and taking it easy.’
        • ‘Clearly both players preferred to take it easy and rest for their semi-finals.’
        • ‘Work was pretty busy this past week and then Thursday I got sick and have been mostly taking it easy around the house since then.’
        • ‘He was clearly still taking it easy and trying to relax.’
        • ‘I rose at 8:30 and am here loafing around taking it easy with my cup of tea and reading the newspaper.’
        • ‘I've been relaxing around Madrid, taking it easy, enjoying the lie-ins and the food, not to mention the one or two drinks at night.’
        • ‘Having done all the hard work, the time before kick-off on Saturday is a case of taking it easy, eating, resting and sleeping.’
        • ‘Basically, it's been a day and a half of taking it easy and ambling around in the heat.’


Middle English (also in the sense comfortable, quiet, tranquil): from Old French aisie, past participle of aisier put at ease, facilitate (see ease).