Definition of eastward in English:

eastward

adjective

  • In an easterly direction.

    ‘they followed an eastward course’
    • ‘Leaders of the former communist countries awaiting EU membership cheered Ireland's decision to endorse the EU's eastward expansion.’
    • ‘Over that time frame, the European Union's eastward expansion will place Berlin at the heart of the continent.’
    • ‘Thus Hellenism in its eastward course and Buddhisn in its westward march came in direct contact in Gandhara art and worked out artistic sculptures and other art forms.’
    • ‘Crews worked on a firebreak in a nearby canyon to try to cut off an eastward route for the fire.’
    • ‘The eastward side of the hurricane is causing significant flooding today across a big swathe of Georgia.’
    • ‘Distance impinged on it from the river, whose waters flowed from the eastward mountains ultimately, as the town always was more or less aware, to the sea, to the world.’
    • ‘The last four hours of paddling we held an eastward course from Orcas to the mainland.’
    • ‘By cutting patches in the path of the beetles' eastward spread, loggers hope to stall their expansion.’
    • ‘Along the storms' eastward track, avalanches killed two people on Saturday in Utah, authorities said.’
    • ‘This eastward road ends at a small peaceful bay, but from this village the road turns south across the Northern Mountain Range through a rainforest.’
    • ‘The winds associated with this broader wake spawn a narrow eastward countercurrent that draws warm water from west to east.’
    • ‘The developing El Nino continues its eastward trek in the Pacific Ocean.’
    • ‘For a few months each year the winds blow easterly, and in those months the ancient Polynesians made eastward voyages of exploration.’
    • ‘The sand forming these two shoals would ordinarily have been deposited on the East Beach during its eastward drift.’
    • ‘Voters in Hungary have agreed to be part of the historic eastward expansion of the European Union, strongly endorsing economic unification with their more developed neighbours to the west.’
    • ‘Ten minutes climbing connects you with our outward and eastward route on what a local thought was Roman road.’
    • ‘The stench drifts whenever a strong eastward wind is blowing.’
    • ‘Most structures can be explained by eastward retreat of the Pacific and Philippine slabs and southward retreat of the Sunda slab.’
    • ‘On the other side, in East Africa, the eastward pressure of the Mid-Atlantic ridge, combined with the opposite forces generated by the impact of India, created enormous stresses.’
    • ‘The Great Plains, occupied by the Dakotas, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas, are cut through by the eastward flows and have become a great prairie supporting cattle ranching and wheat cultivation.’

adverb

  • Toward the east.

    ‘the bus rattled its way eastward’
    • ‘The coastline turns sharply eastward just north of the city, however, making a direct hit on Long Island much more likely.’
    • ‘Another storm system is blowing eastward tonight.’
    • ‘The Gorband, a shallow stream, flows eastward past dozens of small villages with no electricity or running water.’
    • ‘The Antarctic Circumpolar Current, sometimes called the West Wind Drift, circles eastward around Antarctica.’
    • ‘The coastline is mostly flat, but inland and eastward the topography becomes hilly, with more forests and lakes.’
    • ‘She swam eastward a dozen strokes and stood shivering on the rocky bottom, waiting for Wolf to surface.’
    • ‘In the lower elevation of Pinto Basin, Joshua Tree's creosote flats sprawl eastward and forever toward Arizona.’
    • ‘So when El Niño shifts the clouds eastward, the pattern of crests and troughs in the atmosphere also shifts.’
    • ‘The road snakes eastward and upward and vanishes, as great cycling roads always do, into the trees.’
    • ‘However, the general circulation in the Santa Barbara Channel tends to be cyclonic, which often advects cool surface waters eastward along the northern coasts of the Channel Islands.’

noun

  • The direction or region toward the east.

    ‘a squall came from the eastward’
    • ‘What had happened ‘at the eastward,’ and what valence did those events retain in Salem?’
    • ‘To the eastward of the deep water berths, there is about half a mile of docks used by small oversea traffic, and the accommodation provides for vessels of 16 feet of water and 1,000 tons cargo.’
    • ‘Burroughs's specter also told Ann Jr. that he had bewitched a great many soldiers to death at the eastward, when Sir Edmon was there.’
    • ‘He was riding away to the eastward, as fast as he could make his horse go.’

Pronunciation:

eastward

/ˈēs(t)wərd/