Definition of dynamo in English:

dynamo

noun

British
  • 1A machine for converting mechanical energy into electrical energy; a generator.

    • ‘Arguably the autocar laid the foundations for many of today's trains - using a petrol engine to drive a dynamo to power electric motors.’
    • ‘The petrol engine turned a dynamo that produced electricity to drive the two electric motors.’
    • ‘This he established in 1836, using it to give details of his electromagnets and their application in motors and dynamos.’
    • ‘In calm weather, the gases would explosively recombine in combustion engines turning dynamos.’
    • ‘Thus he was able to convert mechanical energy into electrical energy and discover the first dynamo.’
    • ‘It worked under the same principle as a dynamo, where a moving wire in a magnetic field would create electricity.’
    • ‘Those are the brakes that act as dynamos, charging you up whenever you slow down.’
    • ‘Faraday fooled around with wires and magnets and batteries, making the first electric motors and dynamos.’
    • ‘A dynamo converts mechanical energy from a moving electrical conductor into electromagnetic energy and thus generates current.’
    • ‘His uncle had patents on dynamos and electrical meters.’
    • ‘Using a second-hand oil engine and a small dynamo, he lit up the family home with low-power bulbs.’
    • ‘The Englishman Michael Faraday built the first dynamo, capable of turning mechanical energy into electricity, only 173 years ago.’
    • ‘When he walks, the rotor of the dynamo rotates generating electricity and rechargeable batteries could be charged.’
    • ‘When the cars slow down, their energy is captured in dynamos that recharge the battery, rather than being wasted simply heating brake pads.’
    • ‘Hybrids work by using the braking power to spin a dynamo which charges a battery.’
    • ‘As well as a body made from dent-resistant plastic, it has regenerative brakes: pressing the pedal works like a dynamo, recharging the engine.’
    • ‘The seabed generators consist of an array of massive propellers that are spun around as the tidal flow rushes past and drive a dynamo that produces energy.’
    • ‘Despite several eminent scientists predicting that electric light bulbs in a circuit would never work, a lamp powered by current produced by dynamos was demonstrated on 21 October 1879.’
    • ‘In the case of a dynamo, cyclists have no lights when stationary but probably good lighting when moving.’
    • ‘That same polarity functions in an inorganic realm in the principle of the dynamo, where the relative motion of iron and copper generates electricity.’
    1. 1.1informal An extremely energetic person.
      ‘she was a dynamo in London politics’
      • ‘She was always a little dynamo, more than willing to jump in and lend a hand, always had a smile on her face.’
      • ‘She had both a heart and a lung transplanted, and she was an absolute dynamo.’
      • ‘His mother, nearly eighty years old but still a dynamo of energy and faith, has raised fourteen children.’
      • ‘A vivacious dynamo of energy and ambition, she would be the last person to seek the title of saviour of the film industry north of the Border.’
      • ‘Like most 6-year-olds, Mitchie is a dynamo of energy and motion.’
      • ‘He is a whirling dynamo when it comes to jumping, spinning kicks.’
      • ‘Brigid Fitzgerald who has been a dynamo of community development for many years acted as MC for the evening.’
      • ‘Sherman Spencer again proved to be a real dynamo in the forwards with his five goal haul.’
      • ‘I don't care what anyone says, that girl is a dynamo on stage.’
      • ‘The young dynamo came home in first place in Class 6 and finished 18th overall.’
      • ‘He's an extraordinary musician and just a dynamo to work with.’
      • ‘His experience has made him a dynamo within the company and throughout the industry.’
      • ‘The midfield dynamo with the energy and face of a terrier said this spring that the mood around the team was ‘miserable’.’
      • ‘The goalie in the second game was a little dynamo - dashing with great speed and grace.’
      • ‘Some of my gang got up to £120 a day,’ explains the fast-talking, self-styled dynamo.’
      • ‘The four organizers of Expozine are dynamos of productivity.’
      • ‘He's like this dynamo, full of energy and positivity.’
      • ‘Ben Vereen is nothing short of masterful, a dynamo of energy and enthusiasm that carries the show from beginning to end.’
      • ‘She is an intellectual dynamo and long-time friend.’
      • ‘The U.S. dynamo wins his fifth gold medal in the men's 100-meter butterfly.’

Origin

Late 19th century: abbreviation of dynamo-electric machine, from Greek dunamis ‘power’.

Pronunciation

dynamo

/ˈdīnəˌmō//ˈdaɪnəˌmoʊ/