Definition of Dutch door in English:

Dutch door


North American
  • A door divided into two parts horizontally, allowing one half to be shut and the other left open.

    • ‘The space is cozy too: It's equipped with big pillows and full-size chairs, plus windows that tilt open and a Dutch door to draw in cool afternoon breezes.’
    • ‘There is a side-yard where bands play in good weather under a big tree, but today that area is closed off behind the two-part Dutch door.’
    • ‘The front of the house is embellished with a peaked roof, window boxes, shutters, and a Dutch door.’
    • ‘She decked it out with family memorabilia-shutters from her parents' home, the brass letter A from their old retail store on the Dutch door, and the toy-size lantern that acts as a porch light, a remnant of her mother's childhood playhouse.’
    • ‘I followed James up the stairs and headed to the Dutch doors in the living room.’
    • ‘This was a little Dutch door, cut in half horizontally.’
    • ‘Farm touches like the Dutch door in the kitchen make this a cozy space.’
    • ‘‘Get out,’ I said once more, pointing to the Dutch door that exited into the side yard.’
    • ‘A Dutch door is a swinging door made in two parts.’
    • ‘Examples include Dutch doors, which can be open, closed, or half open, and interior windows that can be curtained.’
    • ‘I gave up and ran to the Dutch door that read Pretty Boy.’
    • ‘It can also still function as a garage thanks to a set of glass-paneled Dutch doors opening on the plywood-paneled office side.’
    • ‘Conceived as a Dutch door to nowhere, the work scissored out into the space it was intended to define, as though moving through a looking glass.’


Dutch door

/ˈdəCH ˈˌdô(ə)r/