Definition of dunam in English:

dunam

noun

  • A measure of land area used in parts of the former Turkish empire, including Israel (where it is equal to about 900 square meters)

    • ‘The 100-dunam village under construction near the Negev town of Ofakim will provide a home for 200 mentally and physically disabled adults.’
    • ‘True, they are not quantitatively symmetrical - a life of a mother or a child cannot be numerically equated with the construction of another housing unit or the expropriation of another dunam of land.’
    • ‘However, what immediately sparked the Land Day uprising was the Ministry of Finance decision of 29 February 1976 to confiscate 21,000 dunams of Palestinian land in Galilee.’
    • ‘I had four dunams.’
    • ‘On the other side of town, in Issawiya, an additional 25 dunams were expropriated to build a military base.’
    • ‘According to Lebanese law, every tobacco grower is allowed to hold only four dunams of tobacco-producing land to make his living.’
    • ‘‘I used to own 200 dunams [about 800 acres],’ he says between sips of tea.’
    • ‘The destination is Al-Bustan or ‘garden’: a Palestinian neighbourhood in the pit of the Silwan valley, covering 64 dunams, crested by a mosque, decked by conifer trees and home to 1,000 Palestinians.’
    • ‘Earlier - a few months after Israel's creation - he sold 2.4 million dunam (one dunam is equal to 1,000 square metres) to the Jewish National Fund.’
    • ‘Our parks, our forests and the hundreds of thousands of dunams it owns are used by all the people of Israel.’
    • ‘The largest landowner in town, will have to come up with $8,000 to pay back taxes on his 175 dunams, a sum he doesn't have.’
    • ‘‘Instead of taking 1,200 dunams, now they want to confiscate something like 200,’ says a human rights attorney representing him.’

Origin

From modern Hebrew dûnām or Arabic dūnum, from Turkish dönüm, from dönmek go around.

Pronunciation:

dunam

/ˈdo͝onəm/